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Breonna taylor Intelwars Leftist protesters Los Angeles Media Bias New York Post Newsweek Police watch

Newsweek headline says cop car ‘strikes’ protesters at LA march — but video in magazine’s own story appears to indicate otherwise

Newsweek ran a Sunday story with the following headline, “Police Cruiser Strikes Breonna Taylor Protesters During Los Angeles March.”

But one might be inclined to take issue with the conclusion Newsweek’s headline draws, based on Twitter video the magazine includes in its story to illustrate the apparently heinous act.

The second video below is the clip Newsweek uses; its caption from self-described “Gonzo anti-fascist/anti-racist reporter” Vishal P. Singh tells an even more sinister tale: “LAPD just ran over two protesters at the Hollywood Breonna Taylor march.”

Let’s roll the tape, shall we? (Content warning: Profanity):

If you were expecting a speeding cop car walloping innocent protesters doing nothing remotely problematic during Saturday’s festivities, you might be disappointed about now. Instead the video Newsweek uses shows a pair of protesters standing in front of a police cruiser that’s inching forward, trying to get through an intersection:


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

The camera turns away from the scene momentarily as the sound of one protester pounding the vehicle’s hood is heard, which is shown in other videos. The camera turns back and shows the cruiser’s front bumper beginning to touch one protester’s leg as the vehicle continues inching forward:


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

As the cruiser continues inching forward, the protesters pound the hood again and climb atop it:


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

The cruiser accelerates, and the protesters begin to feel some Newtonian effects:


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

One protester is dispatched from the hood and easily lands feet-first on the street and smartly gets out of the way:


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

Alas, the other protester stays atop the hood as the cruiser drives down the street — with other protesters furiously chasing the cruiser on foot as one individual hollers, “Holy s**t!” and “Did you see that? They just ran two people over!” It isn’t clear from the video what became of the second protester.


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

Newsweek describes the video as showing “the police cruiser speeding forward, knocking off two protesters who had climbed onto the car’s hood” — and the magazine does not use any form of the word “strike” in its story.

As the video in question turns to another intersection, an individual close the camera is heard repeating the mantra: “LAPD just ran over two protesters!” And as the camera is trained on a line of cops, the same voice by the camera is heard saying, “You guys just ran two people over.”


Image source: Twitter video screenshot via @VPS_Reports

Newsweek also quotes another tweet from Singh: “Ppl asking why the protesters who got hit by LAPD’s car jumped on the hood… uh… cuz when you’re getting hit by a car YOU DO NOT WANT TO BE UNDER IT.”

Here’s another Twitter video of the incident, this time from a “Notorious Lefty” who unsurprisingly parrots the same message:

The following clip offers perhaps the clearest vantage point that Newsweek’s choice to use “strikes” in its headline was perhaps far-fetched — as was the claim from the street that “LAPD just ran over two protesters!”


LAPD Takes Antifa For A Ride

youtu.be

‘The sheer dishonesty’

Some folks on Twitter pushed back against Newsweek’s headline:

  • “What gall, when there is a whole video. ‘Cruiser strikes protesters’ my ass,” one user wrote. “They hopped on the hood and started beating on the car after blocking its path. The sheer dishonesty.”
  • “Fake news,” another commenter said.

Others took issue with Singh’s initial tweet:

  • “No, LAPD did not run over two protestors, two protestors attacked a LAPD car, which for their own safety the occupants drove away,” one commenter said.
  • “Are you so blind that you can’t even see who is at fault in this clip? What these 2 are doing is called Obstruction, it’s against the law,” another user wrote. “And the officer clearly did not run over them, they ran over him by jumping on his car. WAKE UP!”
  • “‘Ran over’ is nonsense—they got in front of an accelerating car, then jumped on the hood and started beating on it,” another commenter observed. “What do you expect, for police to just sit there and let themselves be violently attacked? This is pure provocation, and has zero to do with ‘peaceful protest.'”

Anything else?

The New York Post also ran a story on the incident. And while its headline is accurate — “Protester clings to hood of LAPD car during clashes at Breonna Taylor rally” — the caption for the Post’s featured photo invokes that familiar word: “An LAPD cruiser strikes a protesters [sic] during a Breonna Taylor march in Los Angeles on Saturday night.”

Neither Newsweek nor the New York Post immediately responded Monday to TheBlaze’s requests for comment.

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Army ranger Cotton army ranger Intelwars Newsweek Salon tom cotton Tom Cotton

Newsweek edited an article from over 5 years ago just so it could bolster a smear against GOP Sen. Tom Cotton

In a strange move that perhaps serves as an example of just how far left-leaning media outlets will go to smear conservatives, editors at Newsweek decided to retroactively edit an article the outlet published more than five years ago to bolster an attack against Arkansas Republican Sen. Tom Cotton’s military record.

What’s the background?

Last week, liberal magazine Salon published a bizarre hit piece against Cotton, alleging that he misrepresented his military record during congressional campaigns by falsely claiming to be an Army Ranger.

Cotton, a decorated combat veteran who earned a Bronze Star for his service in the Army in both Afghanistan and Iraq, had completed Army Ranger school and been awarded the Ranger tab, which qualifies him to serve in the elite unit.

But in the article, Salon was quick to point out that though “soldiers who complete the course earn the right to wear the Ranger tab … in the eyes of the military, that does not make them an actual Army Ranger.”

Salon even went so far as to belittle Ranger school, characterizing the grueling two-month course as something “that literally anyone in the military is eligible to attend.”

In an article responding to the Salon smear, conservative outlet National Review noted that “there are many veterans, Democrats in Congress, and media outlets that do, in fact, call Ranger school graduates Army Rangers — even if they don’t serve in the 75th Ranger Regiment.”

Then what happened?

One of the many media outlets cited in the National Review article was Newsweek, which ran a story in 2015 about how for “the first time in the Army Ranger School’s 64-year history, two women have completed the intense training program and will become Rangers.”

Newsweek even decided hop on the smear campaign and run its own story about Cotton’s supposed lies, after which the media outlet was summarily called out by Cotton’s office. Only rather than retract the story, Newsweek doubled down by editing its old article. Here’s what happened, courtesy of National Review:

Cotton’s communications director Caroline Tabler tells National Review that Cotton’s office contacted Newsweek this weekend to point out that Newsweek had identified the female Ranger school graduates as Army Rangers in 2015. Newsweek responded by editing its 2015 story to conform to Salon‘s new smear of Cotton. The 2015 Newsweek story no longer says the two women “will become rangers” — the edited version says they “will be allowed to wear the coveted Ranger tab on their uniforms.” (The original Newsweek story can be viewed here.)

The new article includes an editor’s note reading: “Correction: This article has been changed to note that completion of the course allows one to wear the Ranger tab, but does not make one a Ranger.”

Anything else?

National Review writer John McCormack responded to the move by putting Newsweek on blast, calling the outlet out for “stolen valor.”

Hot Air, reporting on the news, rightly noted that “in the end, this is less a story about Senator Cotton’s service designation than it is about how the liberal media will stop at virtually nothing in their efforts to cancel conservatives.”

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Amen coney barrett Catholic Intelwars Newsweek SCOTUS supreme court nominee

Newsweek attacks potential Trump SCOTUS nominee for her Christian faith, has to issue a major correction

President Donald Trump will announce his Supreme Court nomination this weekend, and Judge Amy Coney Barrett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit is believed to be a top candidate.

So media outlets have begun digging into her background, many of them with the intent of finding unfavorable information about the woman who could become President Donald Trump’s third Supreme Court appointment of his first term. Barrett’s Catholic faith has been a primary focus.

Newsweek published an article that claimed in the headline that a Catholic group Barrett is a member of was the inspiration for “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a novel by Margaret Atwood that was recently made into a television show. This is not true, and Newsweek had to issue a correction.

“Correction: This article’s headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. The book’s author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work,” the correction read. “A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error.”

“The Handmaid’s Tale” is described on IMDb as follows: “A religion based autocracy has taken over most of the United States, renaming the country Gilead. In this country women are second-class citizens. Anyone trying to escape is punished.”

The article described some of the aspects of People of Praise, such as opposition to premarital or extramarital sex, opposition to abortion, and opposition to homosexuality and quoted a professor who questioned whether Barrett would be able to make individual decisions as a member of such a group.

Nevertheless, concerns have been raised that Barrett’s ties to the group as would influence her decisions on the Supreme Court.

“These groups can become so absorbing that it’s difficult for a person to retain individual judgment,” Sarah Barringer Gordon, a professor of constitutional law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, previously told The Times.

And while the People of Praise group was never brought up in Barrett’s 2017 confirmation hearing for her current post, Senator Dianne Feinstein told Barrett: “The dogma lives loudly within you.” Barrett told the senators that her faith would not affect her decisions as a judge.

President Donald Trump has said he will announce his nominee on Saturday, after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s funeral. In addition to Barrett, the shortlist reportedly includes Judge Barbara Lagoa of the Eleventh Circuit and Judge Allison Jones Rushing of the Fourth Circuit.

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Amen coney barrett Catholic Intelwars Newsweek SCOTUS supreme court nominee

Newsweek attacks potential Trump SCOTUS nominee for her Christian faith, has to issue a major correction

President Donald Trump will announce his Supreme Court nomination this weekend, and Judge Amy Coney Barrett of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit is believed to be a top candidate.

So media outlets have begun digging into her background, many of them with the intent of finding unfavorable information about the woman who could become President Donald Trump’s third Supreme Court appointment of his first term. Barrett’s Catholic faith has been a primary focus.

Newsweek published an article that claimed in the headline that a Catholic group Barrett is a member of was the inspiration for “The Handmaid’s Tale,” a novel by Margaret Atwood that was recently made into a television show. This is not true, and Newsweek had to issue a correction.

“Correction: This article’s headline originally stated that People of Praise inspired ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’. The book’s author, Margaret Atwood, has never specifically mentioned the group as being the inspiration for her work,” the correction read. “A New Yorker profile of the author from 2017 mentions a newspaper clipping as part of her research for the book of a different charismatic Catholic group, People of Hope. Newsweek regrets the error.”

“The Handmaid’s Tale” is described on IMDb as follows: “A religion based autocracy has taken over most of the United States, renaming the country Gilead. In this country women are second-class citizens. Anyone trying to escape is punished.”

The article described some of the aspects of People of Praise, such as opposition to premarital or extramarital sex, opposition to abortion, and opposition to homosexuality and quoted a professor who questioned whether Barrett would be able to make individual decisions as a member of such a group.

Nevertheless, concerns have been raised that Barrett’s ties to the group as would influence her decisions on the Supreme Court.

“These groups can become so absorbing that it’s difficult for a person to retain individual judgment,” Sarah Barringer Gordon, a professor of constitutional law and history at the University of Pennsylvania, previously told The Times.

And while the People of Praise group was never brought up in Barrett’s 2017 confirmation hearing for her current post, Senator Dianne Feinstein told Barrett: “The dogma lives loudly within you.” Barrett told the senators that her faith would not affect her decisions as a judge.

President Donald Trump has said he will announce his nominee on Saturday, after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s funeral. In addition to Barrett, the shortlist reportedly includes Judge Barbara Lagoa of the Eleventh Circuit and Judge Allison Jones Rushing of the Fourth Circuit.

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Anti-christian Anti-conservative Cross Erick Erickson Intelwars Left-wing media Newsweek Racism accusation

Left-wing Newsweek calls out conservative radio host Erick Erickson for ‘burning cross’ in his yard. They’re Christmas lights.

Newsweek magazine on Sunday ran a story with the breathless headline: “Conservative radio host Erick Erickson criticized for placing ‘burning cross’ in his front yard.”

Sounds pretty bad, right? A real gotcha moment?

Well, here’s a photo of the “burning cross” in question:

A commenter on a story Erickson wrote about the accusation against him actually said, “Seriously, the first association that came to mind when I saw your lawn snapshot was the KKK and burning crosses” and that “you’d have to be blind not to realize that’s exactly what it looks like.”

You mean like this?

Photo by William Campbell/Sygma via Getty Images

Seriously, can’t you see flames flying off the cross on Erickson’s lawn? And of course the billowing smoke all around it.

No?

What’s the truth?

Well, anyway, Erickson explained in his account that two local boys are selling crosses for $20 a pop as part of a “faith over fear” campaign and using the money to buy snacks for hospital break rooms. He added that since people can’t go to church right now, a number of folks have been putting up the crosses and and adding lights on them or shining spotlights on them.

For Erickson’s part, he said he pulled out his Christmas lights, wrapped up the cross “like several of my neighbors had done,” and posted the photo on Instagram.

“Welp. It has become a thing,” he wrote. “Trolls on the Internet accused me of burning a cross in my own yard.” And then, of course, the Newsweek story.

Speaking of which, check out the lil’ wording switch the magazine pulled off in the aftermath:

Image source: Twitter

The headline was changed to read, “Conservative radio host Erick Erickson accused of racial insensitivity for putting lights on cross in his yard.”

Kinda lacks the same umph, eh?

And National Review’s Dan McLaughlin, who tweeted the image of the new headline, added that Newsweek knew its “clickbait headline was false” and had to be changed — yet the story’s original URL was left intact.

How is Erickson responding?

“On the Internet, pagans are mad because someone prominent has wrapped Christmas lights around an Easter cross to remind people of the light shining in the darkness,” Erickson wrote in his reflection piece. “They’ll try to shame me because of who I am and they will use that to try to silence others. Me? I’m going to buy extra lights to make the cross shine brighter.

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