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Atheist activist group wants Bible removed from POW-MIA table at naval facility: ‘Not every sailor is a white, straight Anglo-Saxon Christian male’

An atheist activist group is ordering a naval facility to remove a Bible from a POW-MIA table as its presence goes against the military’s core values and hurts unity, morale, and diversity, Stars and Stripes reported.

What are the details?

The Military Religious Freedom Foundation last week sent a letter to Capt. John Montagnet — commander of Naval Air Facility Atsugi in Japan — after receiving 15 complaints about the Bible from personnel at the installation, MRFF founder Michael Weinstein told the paper.

The MRFF also sent the letter to Army Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as well as acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Harker, Stars and Stripes said.

POW-MIA tables — which honor missing and captured service members — often are set up in military dining facilities, the paper said, adding that official instructions concerning such tables say they must be round and include a white tablecloth, an empty chair, a black napkin, a single red rose, a yellow candle and ribbon, lemon slices, salt, and an overturned wine glass.

Stars and Stripes added that the regulation also says the displays include a Bible to represent “faith in a higher power and the pledge to our country, founded as one nation under God.”

Weinstein, an Air Force veteran, told the paper “this is not a move against Christianity, but one toward inclusivity. Not every sailor is a white, straight Anglo-Saxon Christian male.”

Weinstein noted to Stars and Stripes that he hadn’t received a response from NAF Atsugi as of Monday.

What did the naval facility have to say?

Base spokesman Sam Samuelson told paper Monday he wasn’t aware of the letter.

“The POW-MIA table here is a significant legacy display intended to memorialize and honor American POWs and MIAs among a varied military demographic and is certainly greater than the sum of its parts,” Samuelson told Stars and Stripes. “We can absolutely balance the larger meaning of the table with appropriate policies and the interests of our diverse base culture.”

More from the paper:

Over the past five years, the MRFF’s petitions resulted in the removal of Bibles from POW-MIA tables at Wright Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio; four Veterans’ Administration offices in Pennsylvania, Texas and Ohio; and an allergy clinic at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.

In 2018, the MRFF filed an inspector general complaint against the Navy over a Bible that was included in a POW-MIA table display at U.S. Naval Hospital Okinawa.

In May of 2019, the MRFF backed a federal lawsuit filed against the Manchester Veterans Administration Medical Center in New Hampshire for including a Bible on its POW-MIA table following complaints relayed through the foundation.

Weinstein said the goal of the MRFF is not to eliminate Bibles, but to promote religious diversity.

‘Wrong on every possible level’

“The POW-MIA table is a somber and emotional display,” Weinstein told Stars and Stripes. “Including a Bible alienates service members of other cultural or religious groups and is wrong on every possible level. No religious text, not just the Bible, has a place in that display. If the table included a Quran, Book of Mormon, or a Satanist text, there would be blood in the streets.”

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‘Our Army Combat Fitness Test shouldn’t be the equivalent to an Instagram yoga a** model’: Steven Crowder

The United States Army considers changes to the Combat Fitness Test scoring for male and female soldiers. Steven Crowder offered his thoughts on the issue on Monday’s episode of Louder with Crowder.

In this clip, Crowder said he believes soldiers “should not enter the battlefield” if they are unable to do a pull-up. “Our Army Combat Fitness Test shouldn’t be the equivalent to an Instagram yoga a** model,” Crowder said with a smirk.

Watch the clip for details.

Can’t watch? Download the podcast here.

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To enjoy more of Steven’s uncensored late-night comedy that’s actually funny, join Mug Club — the only place for all of Crowder uncensored and on demand.

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culture Gender Intelwars Navy Navy SEALs political correctness US Military

Navy SEALs remove terms like ‘brotherhood’ from ethos to be more gender-neutral

The U.S. Navy SEALs and the Navy Special Warfare Combat-craft Crewman have removed so-called gendered terms like “brotherhood” from their ethos and creed statements in an effort to present the Navy as gender-neutral.

Another change made to the SEAL ethos was to alter the words “A common man with uncommon desire to succeed” to “Common citizens with uncommon desire to succeed.”

The changes were made to comply with changes in the law allowing women to serve in the SEALs and SWCC, a spokesman for Naval Special Warfare told American Military News.

“Naval Special Warfare continues to deliberately develop a culture of tactical and ethical excellence that reflects the nation we represent, and that draws upon the talents of the all-volunteer force who meet the standards of qualification as a SEAL or SWCC,” Lt. Cmdr. Matthew Stroup said.

“The previous versions of the SEAL Ethos and SWCC Creed were written prior to the law allowing women to serve as operators in Naval Special Warfare,” Stroup continued. “The changes do not in any way reflect lowering standards of entry, rather they ensure that all those who meet the requirements to train to become a SEAL or SWCC are represented in the ethos or creed they live out. This improves the posture of the NSW force by ensuring we draw from the greatest pool of talent available.”

“To date, no women completed the SEAL or SWCC qualification training pipelines,” he added.

The new SEAL ethos can be found on the official website for the Naval Special Warfare Command. American Military News provided a link to an archived version of the ethos containing the original language.

From the report:

Another alteration to the first paragraph changes the phrase “I am that man” to “I am that warrior.”

In the fourth paragraph, the sentence, “The ability to control my emotions and my actions, regardless of circumstance, sets me apart from other men” is changed to “The ability to control my emotions and my actions, regardless of circumstance, sets me apart from others” in the new version of the SEAL ethos.

In the final paragraph of the ethos statement, the prior sentence states, “Brave men have fought and died building the proud tradition and feared reputation that I am bound to uphold.” The sentence is now changed with the reference to “Brave men” changed to “Brave SEALs.”

The memo also calls for the SWCC creed to change the term “Brotherhood” in the first paragraph to “group of maritime warriors.” Additionally, the memo states the sentence “I challenge my brothers to perform, as I expect them to challenge me” is to be changed to “I challenge them to perform, as I expect them to challenge me.”

American Military News also provided links to the new version of the SWCC creed and compared it to a copy of the older version without the gender-neutral changes from the U.S. Special Operations Command website.

“The changes come despite the fact that there have been no women to successfully complete SEAL or SWCC training and enter the elite units,” American Military News reports.

Retired SEAL Eddie Gallagher, who was pardoned by President Trump of one war crime conviction and acquitted of other serious charges, blasted the changes to the SEALs creed in an Instagram post Friday.

“What a joke. Note the names that signed off at the bottom. Adm. Colin Green (part of the hierarchy that tried to use the system to put me away)~ let’s remove all male pronouns & BROTHERHOOD from the SEAL ethos,” Gallagher wrote.

“To be honest I thought the ethos was always BS,” Gallagher added. “Now I know it is. A creed or ethos is supposed to be written in stone, obviously ours is not and will sway to whatever political agenda is being put out.”

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Brett crozier Coronavirus Intelwars Navy Uss theodore roosevelt

Navy will not reinstate USS Roosevelt captain, who authored leaked email pleading for COVID-19 help

The U.S. Navy announced Friday that the former captain of the coronavirus-stricken aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt will not get his job back, despite an earlier investigation that recommended he be returned to the helm.

What are the details?

A press release from Naval Operations reported that Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Michael Gilday determined that ousted Capt. Brett Crozier “will not be re-instated” as commander officer of the ship, after reviewing “the results of the command investigation into the events surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak aboard USS Theodore Roosevelt.”

The media alert also announced a delay in the promotion of Crozier’s boss, saying consideration “of Rear Adm. Stuart Baker for a second star has been delayed pending further examination.”

MarketWatch reported the decision as “a stunning reversal” that serves as “confirmation of concerns expressed by top Pentagon officials who demanded a deeper investigation last month when the initial probe recommended Crozier’s reinstatement as the ship’s captain.”

Gilday himself had endorsed the reinstatement of Crozier a few months ago, but said Friday that if Crozier had not been let go earlier he would be relieved of duty today.

According to Military.com, Gilday said Friday, “Had I known then what I know today, I would have not made that recommendation.” He continued, “In reviewing both [Rear Adm. Stuart] Baker and Crozier’s actions, they did not do enough soon enough to fulfill their primary obligation.”

Fox News reported that “the Navy stressed Crozier was not released from duty for the email or for firing the red flare about the outbreak on his ship. However, the Navy concluded that Crozier had multiple opportunities to alert his chain of command to his concerns before writing the leaked email. Also on the email he only addressed fellow aviators, leaving off a key submariner who is in his chain of command.”

Capt. Crozier was removed from his command of the USS Roosevelt in early April after the media obtained an email he wrote to senior military officials, begging for help for his sailors amid a spreading COVID-19 outbreak on the aircraft carrier.

Then-acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly, who fired Crozier, flew to Guam—where the ship was docked—shortly thereafter and delivered a speech to the crew wherein he said Crozier was either “naive” or “stupid” if he thought his email would not go public. Modly resigned the day after his speech.

In Gilday’s endorsement accompanying the investigation on Friday, he wrote, “I make this decision fully recognizing that his email, which was leaked to the media and is the genesis of this investigation, was sent with the well-being of the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt as his top concern. Also I am mindful that the actions of those involved must be considered with the understanding of the unprecedented nature of the challenge, the fast-pace of the crisis, and the difficulties involved with evolving guidance.”

However, Gilday added, “It is clear to me following this investigation, Capt. Crozier did not act according to the standards I expect of our commanding officers — to adapt in the face of adversity, exercise ingenuity and creativity in crisis, demonstrate resilience, communicate effectively up the chain of command, and to take bold and appropriate action early and often.”

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One of Trump’s personal valets has tested positive for COVID-19

A member of the United States Navy that serves as a personal valet for President Trump has tested positive for the coronavirus, CNN reported Thursday.

Shortly after the report broke, the White House confirmed the news, raising concerns over the possibility that the president has been exposed to the virus.

“We were recently notified by the White House Medical Unit that a member of the United States Military, who works on the White House campus, has tested positive for Coronavirus,” said Hogan Gidley, the deputy White House press secretary, in a statement. “The President and the Vice President have since tested negative for the virus and they remain in great health.”

A White House source reportedly told CNN that news of the individual’s diagnosis was “hitting the fan” in the West Wing Wednesday morning after he began exhibiting “symptoms.”

The New York Times reported last week that Trump and Vice President Mike Pence are frequently tested for the virus, while others in the administration are tested weekly. Administration officials are “given the a rapid-testing kit developed by Abbott, which yields results in about five minutes.”

This is developing story. Refresh for updates.

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Asymptomatic spread Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars Navy Uss theodore roosevelt

60% of coronavirus-infected sailors from the USS Theodore Roosevelt showed no symptoms

Most of the nearly 5,000 members of the USS Theodore Roosevelt crew has been tested for COVID-19, and a majority of those who tested positive had no symptoms at all, according to Reuters.

More than 600 sailors have tested positive for the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, and 60% of those sailors were asymptomatic.

“With regard to COVID-19, we’re learning that stealth in the form of asymptomatic transmission is this adversary’s secret power,” said Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, surgeon general of the Navy, Reuters reported.

The situation aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt gained national attention when the ship’s former captain, Brett Crozier, sent a letter to military leaders asking for help to deal with a small but growing coronavirus outbreak on the ship.

Crozier was fired by former Navy Secretary Thomas Modly for sending the message through unclassified channels to multiple recipients. Shortly after that, Modly resigned due to backlash from comments he made to the ship’s crew about Crozier.

The percentage of sailors with the virus but no symptoms is cause for concern for the Navy, as sailors around the world are in tight quarters on ships where the virus could spread without anyone even knowing that it’s present. One sailor from the USS Theodore Roosevelt has died, and five others are hospitalized.

Asymptomatic spread is also a concern for President Donald Trump, state governors, and the public health officials tasked with deciding when to reopen businesses and allow public gatherings. The United States is still mostly testing patients who display significant COVID-19 symptoms, meaning there is no way to know or even accurately estimate how many asymptomatic cases exist.

The data from the USS Theodore Roosevelt tests give some insight into the potential that many young, otherwise healthy people in the general population could be infected and may be spreading COVID-19 without their knowledge. It could also mean that the virus’ actual mortality rate is much lower than currently believed.

“The findings are of enormous interest because the proportion of people who are asymptomatic is just simply not known,” said William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, to Reuters.

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60% of coronavirus-infected sailors from the USS Theodore Roosevelt showed no symptoms

Most of the nearly 5,000 members of the USS Theodore Roosevelt crew has been tested for COVID-19, and a majority of those who tested positive had no symptoms at all, according to Reuters.

More than 600 sailors have tested positive for the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, and 60% of those sailors were asymptomatic.

“With regard to COVID-19, we’re learning that stealth in the form of asymptomatic transmission is this adversary’s secret power,” said Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, surgeon general of the Navy, Reuters reported.

The situation aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt gained national attention when the ship’s former captain, Brett Crozier, sent a letter to military leaders asking for help to deal with a small but growing coronavirus outbreak on the ship.

Crozier was fired by former Navy Secretary Thomas Modly for sending the message through unclassified channels to multiple recipients. Shortly after that, Modly resigned due to backlash from comments he made to the ship’s crew about Crozier.

The percentage of sailors with the virus but no symptoms is cause for concern for the Navy, as sailors around the world are in tight quarters on ships where the virus could spread without anyone even knowing that it’s present. One sailor from the USS Theodore Roosevelt has died, and five others are hospitalized.

Asymptomatic spread is also a concern for President Donald Trump, state governors, and the public health officials tasked with deciding when to reopen businesses and allow public gatherings. The United States is still mostly testing patients who display significant COVID-19 symptoms, meaning there is no way to know or even accurately estimate how many asymptomatic cases exist.

The data from the USS Theodore Roosevelt tests give some insight into the potential that many young, otherwise healthy people in the general population could be infected and may be spreading COVID-19 without their knowledge. It could also mean that the virus’ actual mortality rate is much lower than currently believed.

“The findings are of enormous interest because the proportion of people who are asymptomatic is just simply not known,” said William Schaffner, an infectious disease specialist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, to Reuters.

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Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars Navy Uss theodore roosevelt

Sailor dies of coronavirus, hundreds infected, thousands evacuated on USS Theodore Roosevelt days after ship’s captain was dismissed for warning letter

A sailor aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt has died from COVID-19 just over a week after the former captain of the ship issued an urgent memo to military leaders about the growing outbreak, CNN reported.

The former captain, Brett Crozier, was dismissed for his warning memo, which called for more help from military leaders and the evacuation of the ship. At that time, there were 100 known COVID-19 cases — now there are 600 on the ship.

The USS Theodore Roosevelt typically carries about 5,000 sailors on board. So far, about 4,000 of them have been evacuated, with 1,000 staying on to perform the essential duties necessary to the operation of an aircraft carrier with nuclear capability.

The sailor who died tested positive for the coronavirus on March 30. He was found unresponsive on the ship on April 10, and transferred to the intensive care unit.

“The entire Department is deeply saddened by the loss of our first active duty member to Covid-19. Our thoughts are with the family of the USS Theodore Roosevelt sailor who lost his battle with the virus today. We remain committed to protecting our personnel and their families while continuing to assist in defeating this outbreak,” Defense Secretary Mark Esper said, CNN reported.

News of Crozier’s letter to military leaders broke in the San Francisco Chronicle on March 31. Crozier warned that the crowded conditions of the ship, which is docked in Guam, set up prime conditions for rapid spread of the virus because social distancing was almost impossible.

“This will require a political solution but it is the right thing to do,” Crozier wrote in the letter. “We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset—our sailors.”

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly dismissed Crozier over the memo, but then was pressured into resigning for a vulgar tirade on the USS Theodore Roosevelt defending his decision to dismiss Crozier.

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Either ‘naive’ or ‘stupid’: Acting Navy Secretary slams ousted captain in speech to crew of USS Theodore Roosevelt

Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas Modly used bold language in rebuking the former captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt during a speech to the ship’s crew on Monday, after making a special trip to Guam to deliver the message.

The subject of Modly’s criticism was Capt. Brett Crozier, who was relieved of his command from the aircraft carrier last week after the media obtained a letter he wrote begging for officials to help his sailors as COVID-19 spread throughout the ship.

What are the details?

The Daily Caller first broke the story of the speech and released the transcript, showing that Modly told the crew that if Crozier “didn’t think, in my opinion, that this information wasn’t going to get out into the public, in this day and information age that we live in, then he was either A, too naive, or too stupid to be a commanding officer of a ship like this. The alternative is that he did this on purpose.”

Sec. Modly’s speech was quickly leaked to the press in both text and audio formats.

According to audio of the speech obtained by Task & Purpose, the speech did not go over well — at least with some of crew. One person can be heard responding, “What the f***.”

Capt. Crozier’s letter made headlines, his firing made headlines, his crew cheering him as he left the ship made headlines, news that he subsequently tested positive for COVID-19 made headlines, and the reaction from President Donald Trump made headlines.

President Trump told the press in reaction to Crozier’s dismissal, “He shouldn’t be talking that way in a letter. I thought it was terrible what he did,” Fox News reported.

Capt. Crozier had said in his letter to senior military officials, “We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset — our Sailors.”

In response to that, Sec. Modly explained in his speech, “One of the things about his email that bothered me the most was saying that we are not at war, that we aren’t technically at war. But let me tell ya something, the only reason we are dealing with this right now is a big authoritative regime called China was not forthcoming about what was happening with this virus and they put the world at risk to protect themselves and to protect their reputations.”

“We don’t do that in the Navy,” he continued. “We are transparent with each other, using the proper channels and with each other.”

Sec. Modly also disclosed to the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt that it was their shipmates “on the shore right now who told me when Captain Crozier’s email made it to the San Francisco Chronicle after working 15 hour days—they were demoralized because they knew what they had been doing for you guys since the 25th of March to get you guys what you needed.”

Yet, Modly acknowledged to the crew, “I understand you may be angry with me for the rest of your lives,” but promised his word, “We will get you the help that you need.”

After the speech was leaked to the press, Modly stood by his comments, releasing a statement saying, “I have not listened to a recording of my remarks since speaking to the crew so I cannot verify if the transcript is accurate. The spoken words were from the heart, and meant for them. I stand by every word I said, even, regrettably any profanity that may have been used for emphasis. Anyone who has served on a Navy ship would understand. I ask, but don’t expect, that people read them in their entirety.”

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Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars Navy U.s.s. theodore roosevelt

US Navy captain seeks help as coronavirus outbreak spreads on 4,000-person ship: ‘Sailors do not need to die’

The captain of the USS Theodore Roosevelt is asking for more help to deal with a spreading coronavirus outbreak on the ship, which is carrying 4,000 crew members, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

At least 100 crew members have tested positive for COVID-19, and the close quarters of the ship create an environment in which proper isolation methods are difficult or impossible.

“Removing the majority of personnel from a deployed U.S. nuclear aircraft carrier and isolating them for two weeks may seem like an extraordinary measure. … This is a necessary risk,” Capt. Brett Crozier wrote to senior military officials. “Keeping over 4,000 young men and women on board the TR is an unnecessary risk and breaks faith with those Sailors entrusted to our care.”

The ship has been docked in Guam since the infections were discovered last week. Crozier is concerned that without a coordinated effort, sailors could needlessly die.

“This will require a political solution but it is the right thing to do,” Crozier wrote in the letter. “We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset — our Sailors.”

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly addressed Crozier’s concerns on CNN and explained some of the difficulties of coming up with a good solution.

“I heard about the letter from Capt. Crozier (Tuesday) morning, I know that our command organization has been aware of this for about 24 hours and we have been working actually the last seven days to move those sailors off the ship and get them into accommodations in Guam,” Modly said. “The problem is that Guam doesn’t have enough beds right now and we’re having to talk to the government there to see if we can get some hotel space, create tent-type facilities.”

None of the infected sailors are yet suffering from serious symptoms, but the number of cases has multiplied steadily since the first three were discovered on March 24.

(H/T: New York Times)

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