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California Campaign 2020 Intelwars mail Mail-in ballots Santa Monica usps

California man finds dozens of mail-in ballots discarded in alley trash cans

A California man is sounding the alarm bell after he found dozens of mail-in ballots mysteriously stuffed inside two Santa Monica trash cans.

The shocking discovery comes as the 2020 presidential election is well under way in terms of absentee and mail-in ballots. Voting by mail took newfound prominence in the national dialogue over the summer as leaders looked for safe methods of conducting a national election amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many Americans, therefore, have chosen to cast their vote via mail-in ballot, which Republican critics say increases the possibility of voter fraud.

What are the details?

Osvaldo Jimenez told KABC-TV that he made the alarming discovery last Thursday. Stuffed inside a Santa Monica trash can, Jimenez discovered dozens of official ballots, along with other personal mail items, such as bank statements.

“I opened the trash can, and I see a lot of envelopes and ballots, especially ballot envelopes in the trash can, and I knew right away that was not normal,” Jimenez said. “I thought it was somebody playing a prank. Nobody’s going to throw ballot envelopes in the trash can.”

Jimenez’s wife posted pictures of the trashed ballots on social media, KCBS-TV reported.

According to KABC, Jimenez recovered the ballots and phoned police.

“If it was my ballot in there, I would want somebody to, you know, recover it,” Jimenez told KABC. “Every vote counts, whichever party it is.”

Shockingly, Jimenez later discovered even more mail-in ballots in a separate trash can, KABC reported.

How the ballots ended up in the trash cans is not clear. Law enforcement is investigating the incidents, as is the United States Postal Service.

Anything else?

As mail-in ballots play a greater role in the election than they ever have before, there have numerous stories of suspicious activities happening with mail.

For example, the U.S. Postal Service is investigating an incident that happened in Glendale, California, last month in which massive bags of mail were mysteriously dumped in a parking lot.

Then, just last week, a New Jersey mail carrier was arrested after police say he dumped thousands of mail pieces he was supposed to deliver. Among the pieces of discarded mail were 99 ballots.

Meanwhile, an investigation was launched in Virginia last week after six USPS collection boxes were broken into, sparking new fears that mail-in ballots could be compromised or stolen.

Election officials nationwide, however, say that despite mail-in ballots playing a significant role in this year’s election, the integrity of the election will not be compromised.

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ballots Dumping Intelwars mail Mailman New Jersey usps

New Jersey mailman arrested for allegedly dumping mail, including 99 election ballots

A United States Postal Service letter carrier from New Jersey was arrested on Wednesday for allegedly tossing more than 1,800 pieces of mail into dumpsters, including 99 election ballots.

What are the details?

Nicholas Beauchene, 26, of Kearny, stands accused by federal authorities of throwing away mail he was assigned to deliver on his route in recent days.

According to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of New Jersey:

Approximately 1,875 pieces of mail – including 627 pieces of first class, 873 pieces of standard class, two pieces of certified mail, 99 general election ballots destined for residents in West Orange, and 276 campaign flyers from local candidates for West Orange Town Council and Board of Education – were recovered from dumpsters in North Arlington and West Orange on Oct. 2, 2020, and Oct. 5, 2020. The mail had been scheduled to be delivered on Sept. 28, Oct. 1, and Oct. 2, 2020, to addresses on certain postal routes in Orange and West Orange. On the delivery dates for which mail was recovered, Beauchene was the only mail carrier assigned to deliver mail to the addresses on the recovered mail.

The USPS told WCBS-TV that the discarded mail has since been delivered.

Beauchene was charged with one count of delay, secretion, or detention of mail and one count of obstruction of mail. The first offense could land him in prison for up to 5 years with a $250,000 fine, and the second is punishable by up to 6 months in the slammer and $5,000 in fines.

The Daily Mail reported that Orange and West Orange are both in Essex County, New Jersey, which voted “overwhelmingly” for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in the 2016 general election. The outlet noted that Clinton garnered more than 240,000 votes in the county compared to then-candidate Donald Trump’s 630,000-or-so votes.

Anything else?

According to the New York Post, the New Jersey incident comes “amid fears over mail-in voting dysfunction in the 2020 presidential race.” The Post pointed to the chaos in New York City after as many as 140,000 residents were mailed absentee ballots with either wrong name and address — or another person’s ballot altogether.

An investigation was also launched in Virginia this week, where election officials warned that six USPS collection boxes were broken into in multiple counties, sparking fears that mail-in ballots could have been stolen.

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Blockchain Cybersecurity Intelwars mail Voting

US Postal Service Files Blockchain Voting Patent

The US Postal Service has filed a patent on a blockchain voting method:

Abstract: A voting system can use the security of blockchain and the mail to provide a reliable voting system. A registered voter receives a computer readable code in the mail and confirms identity and confirms correct ballot information in an election. The system separates voter identification and votes to ensure vote anonymity, and stores votes on a distributed ledger in a blockchain

I wasn’t going to bother blogging this, but I’ve received enough emails about it that I should comment.

As is pretty much always the case, blockchain adds nothing. The security of this system has nothing to do with blockchain, and would be better off without it. For voting in particular, blockchain adds to the insecurity. Matt Blaze is most succinct on that point:

Why is blockchain voting a dumb idea?

Glad you asked.

For starters:

  • It doesn’t solve any problems civil elections actually have.
  • It’s basically incompatible with “software independence”, considered an essential property.
  • It can make ballot secrecy difficult or impossible.

Both Ben Adida and Matthew Green have written longer pieces on blockchain and voting.

News articles.

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Blockchain Cybersecurity Intelwars mail Voting

US Postal Service Files Blockchain Voting Patent

The US Postal Service has filed a patent on a blockchain voting method:

Abstract: A voting system can use the security of blockchain and the mail to provide a reliable voting system. A registered voter receives a computer readable code in the mail and confirms identity and confirms correct ballot information in an election. The system separates voter identification and votes to ensure vote anonymity, and stores votes on a distributed ledger in a blockchain

I wasn’t going to bother blogging this, but I’ve received enough emails about it that I should comment.

As is pretty much always the case, blockchain adds nothing. The security of this system has nothing to do with blockchain, and would be better off without it. For voting in particular, blockchain adds to the insecurity. Matt Blaze is most succinct on that point:

Why is blockchain voting a dumb idea?

Glad you asked.

For starters:

  • It doesn’t solve any problems civil elections actually have.
  • It’s basically incompatible with “software independence”, considered an essential property.
  • It can make ballot secrecy difficult or impossible.

Both Ben Adida and Matthew Green have written longer pieces on blockchain and voting.

News articles.

Share
Categories
Blockchain Cybersecurity Intelwars mail Voting

US Postal Service Files Blockchain Voting Patent

The US Postal Service has filed a patent on a blockchain voting method:

Abstract: A voting system can use the security of blockchain and the mail to provide a reliable voting system. A registered voter receives a computer readable code in the mail and confirms identity and confirms correct ballot information in an election. The system separates voter identification and votes to ensure vote anonymity, and stores votes on a distributed ledger in a blockchain

I wasn’t going to bother blogging this, but I’ve received enough emails about it that I should comment.

As is pretty much always the case, blockchain adds nothing. The security of this system has nothing to do with blockchain, and would be better off without it. For voting in particular, blockchain adds to the insecurity. Matt Blaze is most succinct on that point:

Why is blockchain voting a dumb idea?

Glad you asked.

For starters:

  • It doesn’t solve any problems civil elections actually have.
  • It’s basically incompatible with “software independence”, considered an essential property.
  • It can make ballot secrecy difficult or impossible.

Both Ben Adida and Matthew Green have written longer pieces on blockchain and voting.

News articles.

Share
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Fraud Intelwars mail Voter

Mail carrier charged with attempted election fraud for allegedly altering mail-in ballots

A West Virginia mail carrier has been charged with attempted election fraud, after allegedly altering several mail-in ballots on his contracted route.

The same day the Department of Justice announced the accusations of alleged tampering, President Donald Trump was censored by Twitter after warning that mail-in ballots are “substantially fraudulent.”

What are the details?

The DOJ said in a press release that mail carrier Thomas Cooper was charged with attempt to defraud the residents of West Virginia of a fair election after an investigation found that the 47-year-old allegedly made changes to a number of mail-in ballots sent to individuals on his contracted route with the United States Postal Service.

The bulletin notes:

The investigation found five ballot requests that had been altered from ‘Democrat’ to ‘Republican.’ On three other requests the party wasn’t changed, but the request had been altered.

Cooper was responsible for the mail delivery of the three towns from which the tampered requests were mailed: Onego, Riverton, and Franklin, West Virginia. According to the affidavit, Cooper admitted to altering some of the requests, saying it was a joke.

The Daily Wire pointed out that “the news comes as Twitter started attaching warning labels to President Donald Trump’s tweets on Tuesday that led to a series of articles from left-wing media organizations that claimed that Trump’s warnings about fraud coming from mail-in voting were ‘unsubstantiated.'”

Earlier in the day, President Trump tweeted, “There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged and even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed.”

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany also shared a report on Tuesday from the Las Vegas Review-Journal, indicating instances of ballots discovered lying around unclaimed in public spaces for the taking.

The outlet reported further that “Jenny Trobiani, a 36-year veteran carrier with the U.S. Postal Service, said she had never seen anything like the influx of absentee ballots that were ‘no good.'” She said, “(The recipients) had all moved or died.”

Trobiani, The Review-Journal reported, “Kept 65 of these ballots with her on her first delivery say after they began to flood in from the county, and more than 100 on the second. In all, she said, there were thousands sitting in crates with no additional safeguards and marked to be sent back to the county.”

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