Categories
Black Lives Matter Intelwars National Anthem Protest protest Soccer social justice Us women's soccer team Uswnt

US women’s soccer team wear ‘Black Lives Matter’ uniforms, protest national anthem in Europe

After not playing for nearly nine months, the United States women’s soccer team protested the national anthem and made a social justice statement with “Black Lives Matter” uniforms prior to a game on Friday.

Ahead of their game with the Netherlands’ national team, the American women walked out of the locker room wearing jackets emblazoned with “Black Lives Matter.” During the playing of the American national anthem, nearly every member of the team knelt, according to ESPN, a sign of protest against America.

“We wear Black Lives Matter to affirm human decency. This is not political, it’s a statement on human rights,” the USWNT Twitter account said, along with a video showing the Black Lives Matter uniform jacket.

In a statement, the team said they “love our country” and called it “a true honor to represent America,” but explained that supporting Black Lives Matter is an affirmation of “human decency.”

The statement said:

We love our country, and it is a true honor to represent America. It is also our duty to demand that the liberties and freedoms that our country was founded on extend to everyone.

Today, we wear Black Lives Matter to affirm human decency. We protest against racial injustice and police brutality against Black people. We protest against the racist infrastructures that do not provide equal opportunity for Black and brown people to fulfill their dreams, including playing on this team. As the United States Women’s National team players, we collectively work toward a society where the American ideals are upheld, and Black lives are no longer systematically targeted.

Black Lives Matter.

Friday’s game, the first in 261 days, was also the team’s first game since racial unrest gripped the U.S. in the early summer following George Floyd’s tragic death.

The U.S. men’s soccer team also wore social justice messages on their pregame jersey’s earlier this month, in their first outing since Floyd’s death. The team wore anthem jackets with the words “Be the Change” emblazoned on the front with differing messages on the back, including, “Black Lives Matter,” “Be Anti-Racist,” and “Unity,” according to ESPN.

The women’s soccer team won Friday’s game by a score of 2-0.

Share
Categories
Black Lives Matter Black Panthers BLM Colin Kaepernick Intelwars mumia abu jamal social justice

Colin Kaepernick calls for release of convicted cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal

Activist Colin Kaepernick called for the release of Mumia Abu-Jamal, a former Black Panther who was convicted of killing a 25-year-old Philadelphia police officer in 1981.

The former NFL quarterback recorded a video for the “Bring Mumia Home” campaign, where he said that Abu-Jamal “is a human being who deserves to be free.”

In the video that was released Monday, Kaepernick described Mumia as “a political prisoner who has since the age of 14 dedicated his life to fighting against racism [who] continues to be caged and lives his life on a slow death row.”

“We’re in the midst of a movement that says Black Lives Matter, and if that’s truly the case, then it means that Mumia’s life and legacy must matter,” Kaepernick said in the video. “And the causes that he sacrificed his life and freedom for must matter as well.”

The former San Francisco 49ers quarterback claimed Abu-Jamal was “framed” in the killing of Philadelphia police Officer Daniel Faulkner, and contends the former Black Panther member was not given a fair trial.

“Mumia has been in prison longer than I’ve been alive,” Kaepernick said in the video that was shown at an event that involved Black Lives Matter Philadelphia and the Black Philly Radical Collective. “Since 1981, Mumia has maintained his innocence. His story has not changed.”

Kaepernick believes that Abu-Jamal has had to endure “psychosocial torture” from being in prison for 38 years, which he says is “a second by second assault on the soul.”


Colin Kaepernick Speaks on Mumia’s Freedom

www.youtube.com

The Justice for Daniel Faulkner Facebook page disputed Kaepernick’s assertions.

“Another article including a video statement on Kaepernick calling for the ‘release of convicted cop killer Mumia Abu Jamal.’ Kaepernick repeatedly states in video that Mumia has been in jail for 38 years and deserves freedom,” the page stated. “Why on earth would he deserve freedom for committing a murder? The video shows Kaepernick truly has no knowledge on the true facts and evidence of his conviction. The ignorance of Kaepernick is a disgrace.”

Abu-Jamal was convicted of first-degree murder after being found guilty in the shooting death of Faulkner in 1982. Abu-Jamal was originally sentenced to death, but he was resentenced to life in 2012.

“Faulkner was shot and killed in a scuffle after pulling over Abu-Jamal’s brother in what was then ‘the red-light district’ as the bars closed,” the Philadelphia Tribune reported. “Abu-Jamal, who moonlighted as a cab driver, came upon the scene and was found shot and wounded in the aftermath nearby. The prosecution witnesses testified that Abu-Jamal, then known as Wesley Cook, ran toward the scene and shot the officer. His brother never testified and soon left town.”

“Just before 4 a.m. on Dec. 9, 1981, in a rough downtown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Police Officer Daniel Faulkner stopped a Volkswagen Beetle and arrested its driver, William Cook, for driving the wrong way down a one-way street,” the Baltimore Sun reported. “Expecting or experiencing trouble, Daniel Faulkner radioed for assistance.

“When fellow police officers arrived, they found him lying in the street, shot in the back and the face,” the news report stated. “A few feet away, slumped in his own pool of blood, was William Cook’s brother, a free-lance journalist and black activist named Mumia Abu-Jamal – born Wesley Cook.

“Mumia Abu-Jamal, who moonlighted as a cab driver, later said that he had been driving by and, seeing a police officer hitting his brother, stopped his cab and rushed to his defense,” the paper wrote in 1995. “His licensed .38 caliber pistol, which he had bought after having been robbed twice, was found at the scene.”

Kaepernick wants the Philadelphia district attorney’s office to release Mumia Abu-Jamal.

There is an ongoing legal battle because Faulkner’s widow, Maureen Faulkner, wants to remove Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner from handling Abu-Jamal’s appeals. The widow alleges there is a conflict of interest because the former law firm of Krasner’s wife had represented Abu-Jamal in the past.

In February, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court ordered a special master to investigate the conflict of interest allegations, KYW-TV reported. The court assumed jurisdiction over the case, and has halted all legal appeals for Abu-Jamal.

The 64-year-old Abu-Jamal is currently serving a life term at the Mahanoy State Correctional Institution in Frackville, Schuylkill County.

Share
Categories
Brett favre Intelwars Mlb ratings Nba ratings NFL ratings President Trump social justice Sports ratings Sports tv ratings

Brett Favre tells President Trump: ‘Fans clearly do not want political messaging mixed with their sports’

Brett Favre has an idea why sports leagues are experiencing historically low TV ratings — politics.

President Donald Trump participated in a presidential election town hall event for Sinclair Broadcasting this week. During Wednesday’s Q&A event that was hosted by political commentator Eric Bolling, Trump was greeted by his friend and golfing buddy Brett Favre.

The former Green Bay Packers star quarterback said it would be for the best to keep politics out of professional sports.

“The NBA and the NFL are struggling with lower ratings, as fans clearly do not want political messaging mixed with their sports,” Favre said during the town hall, then asked, “So how should the leagues support and promote an anti-racism position without becoming political and alienating fans?”

Trump agreed with the Hall of Fame NFL QB.

“People don’t want to see all of the politics,” Trump replied. “They’ve got enough politics, with me and with everybody else. And they don’t want to see it with football or sports, on Sunday or whenever they happen to be watching.”

“I think it’s had a huge impact on sports, a huge negative impact on sports,” the president said. “And I think that football ought to get back to football and basketball to basketball. And let politics remain separate.”

Trump noted that the NBA’s ratings are “down 70%, more than that.”

In September, Trump commented on the poor TV ratings that the NBA was experiencing.

“People are tired of watching the highly political @NBA,” Trump tweeted. “Basketball ratings are WAY down, and they won’t be coming back. I hope football and baseball are watching and learning because the same thing will be happening to them. Stand tall for our Country and our Flag!!!”

The NBA went hard in the paint with social justice messaging once the basketball league returned to after the suspended season because of the COVID-19 pandemic. During its bubble format regular season and playoffs at Disney World, “Black Lives Matter” was painted on the court, and players wore approved messages on their jerseys, such as “Power to the people,” “I Can’t Breathe,” and “Anti-Racist.”

The NBA Finals averaged only 7.45 million viewers during the six-game series this year, easily making it the least-watched Finals on record.

In the first week of the 2020 NBA playoffs, ESPN, ABC, and TNT averaged just 1.875 million viewers per game, TV ratings were down 20% compared to 2019.

Following the poorly-rated NBA Finals, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said that “Black Lives Matter” messages will likely not be displayed on the court or on players’ jerseys next season.

NFL ratings were down 10% through the first four weeks of this season.

Game 1 of the Rays-Dodgers World Series had the worst TV ratings of all-time.

Share
Categories
Coinbase Dick Costolo Dick costolo net worth Intelwars social justice Twitter

Former Twitter CEO fantasizes about capitalists who don’t embrace social justice being executed in the ‘revolution’

Dick Costolo, the former CEO of Twitter, painted a dark and violent future for business leaders who don’t embrace social justice in the workplace. In a shocking tweet, Costolo gleefully suggested that capitalists would be executed by a firing squad.

Coinbase announced in a blog post on Sunday that the cryptocurrency exchange would focus minimally on policy decisions, nonprofit work, broader societal issues, and political causes that are not “directly related to the mission” of the company.

“We don’t advocate for any particular causes or candidates internally that are unrelated to our mission, because it is a distraction from our mission,” the post said of political causes. “Even if we all agree something is a problem, we may not all agree on the solution.”

“I realized at some point this year that many employees were interpreting our mission in different ways,” Coinbase’s CEO Brian Armstrong wrote in the post. “Some people interpreted the mission more broadly, to include all forms of equality and justice. It makes sense if you believe that economic freedom is not possible without equality for all people. Others interpreted the mission more narrowly, believing that we were trying to create infrastructure for the cryptoeconomy, and that yes, this would create more equality of access for all people, but we weren’t trying to solve all forms of inequality in the world.”

Coinbase’s attempt to achieve an “apolitical culture” while focusing on the corporate mission and not on activism was applauded by some, such as internet entrepreneur and investor Jason Calacanis.

“Most folks want to work in an environment free from today’s vitriolic politics,” he wrote. “Sure, @coinbase will lose folks who are passionate about politics/social issues, but they will gain a massive influx of talent that wants work to be about work and work only.”

The apolitical work environment was also met by resistance by many who have warmly welcomed the recent surge in protests for social justice, including Costolo.

Costolo, who was named as one of the 10 most influential U.S. tech CEOs by Time magazine in 2013 before stepping down as Twitter’s CEO in 2015, posted his opinion on the matter on Twitter.

“This isn’t great leadership. It’s the abdication of leadership,” Costolo tweeted on Tuesday. “It’s the equivalent of telling your employees to ‘shut up and dribble.'”

“Tech companies used to welcome lively debate about ideas and society,” Costolo said. “It was part of the social contract inside the company, and it’s what differentiated tech culture from, say, Wells Fargo culture. Now it’s considered a distraction.”

“Abandoning the social contract with employees in favor of a purely economic contract in the guise of ‘championship team’ bs makes you a bank with a mission nobody really believes,’ he continued. “Good luck getting the best engineers in the world to work at a bank.”

“There’s a difference between building a massive company and being a great leader, right? But i’ll go re-read tours of duty because i generally think i need to re-think something if i disagree with you,” said Costolo, who ran Twitter before his successor Jack Dorsey.

Then in his last tweet in the discussion on Twitter, Costolo bizarrely fantasized about a “revolution” where business leaders who didn’t practice social justice would suffer a death via firing squad.

“Me-first capitalists who think you can separate society from business are going to be the first people lined up against the wall and shot in the revolution,” said Costolo who has a reported estimated net worth of $300 million. “I’ll happily provide video commentary.”

According to Twitter’s terms of service, “You may not threaten violence against an individual or a group of people. We also prohibit the glorification of violence.”

Share
Categories
California Diversity Gavin Newsom Intelwars Racial justice Racial quotas social justice State politics

California implements state-mandated racial quotas for corporate boards, creates task force to study slavery reparations

California now leads the nation in corporate affirmative action as Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom signed into law Wednesday a bill mandating racial and sexual identity quotas for corporate boards.

The new law requires publicly traded businesses with headquarters located in California to hire at least one diverse board member from an “underrepresented community” by 2021, Fox Business reports. To qualify as underrepresented, an individual must self-identify as black, Latino, Asian, Pacific Islander, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Alaska Native, or as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender.

Corporate boards with four to nine directors must hire at least two diverse individuals by the end of 2022. If a company has nine or more directors they must make three diverse hires. Punitive fines of $100,000 for the first violation and $300,000 for repeat violations will be levied against companies that do not comply with the state quotas.

The new law builds on a 2018 law that required boardrooms to hire at least one female director by 2019. Conservative groups have challenged the diversity statute in court, arguing the law is unconstitutional under the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment.

Newsom hailed the law as an important step toward ensuring racial representation in powerful corporations.

“When we talk about racial justice, we talk about power and needing to have seats at the table,” Newsom said at the online signing ceremony for the new law.

“The new law represents a big step forward for racial equity,” said Democratic state Assemblyman Chris Holden, one of the authors of the bill, in a statement. “While some corporations were already leading the way to combat implicit bias, now, all of California’s corporate boards will better reflect the diversity of our state.”

The new diversity quotas are part of a larger package of racial legislation signed into law on Wednesday. The package includes a law creating a task force to study and make recommendations on reparations to the black community for slavery. New laws also prohibit the use of peremptory challenges to remove potential jurors based on racial, ethnic, religious, or gender identity and allow judges to alter sentences that are believed to involve racial or ethnic discrimination.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive. Our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions,” said Gov. Newsom. “California’s rich diversity is our greatest asset, and we won’t turn away from this moment to make right the discrimination and disadvantages that Black Californians and people of color still face. While there is still so much work to do to unravel this legacy, these pieces of legislation are important steps in the right direction to building a more inclusive and equitable future for all.”

Share
Categories
Coinbase cryptocurrency Coinbase sjw rejection Coinbase vs sjw Intelwars Liberals angry at coinbase social justice Social justice corporations Social justice statements

Liberals are furious at cryptocurrency company for rejecting overt displays of social justice activism

A popular cryptocurrency company released a statement rejecting overt displays of social justice activism and liberals are outraged.

Brian Armstrong, the co-founder and CEO of Coinbase, released the statement on Sunday clarifying the company’s mission statement.

“I want Coinbase to be laser focused on achieving its mission, because I believe that this is the way that we can have the biggest impact on the world. We will do this by playing as a championship team, focus on building, and being transparent about what our mission is and isn’t,” Armstrong said in the statement.

Armstrong directly addressed social issues.

“We don’t engage here when issues are unrelated to our core mission, because we believe impact only comes with focus,” he said.

He also rejected overt support of political causes or issues.

“We don’t advocate for any particular causes or candidates internally that are unrelated to our mission, because it is a distraction from our mission,” he explained. “Even if we all agree something is a problem, we may not all agree on the solution.”

Armstrong said his company would seek an alternative path to Silicon Valley companies who engage in social justice activism because it creates internal division and distraction.

“We’ve seen what internal strife at companies like Google and Facebook can do to productivity, and there are many smaller companies who have had their own challenges here. I believe most employees don’t want to work in these divisive environments. They want to work on a winning team that is united and making progress toward an important mission,” he continued.

‘Commitment to a white supremacist workplace’

Many on the left were outraged that Armstrong would reject social justice activism as an essential part of corporate practice, and they took to Twitter to express their anger.

“NEW: @coinbase announces new commitment to a white supremacist workplace,” said Nandini Jammi, a liberal activist.

“If you’ve ever wanted to embarrass your employees, take notes on this spineless corporate drivel from the CEO of Coinbase,” responded Ben Sandofsky.

“This is pretty appalling. @brian_armstrong is essentially saying, just sit down, shut up, and make money for me. Things like social justice are a distraction from making money for me, so do that on your own time,” said software engineer Allen Holub.

“Coinbase announced that it stands for nothing beyond profits and if you’ve got a problem with that you should go work somewhere else,” said Casey Newton.

Others claimed they would be dropping Coinbase over the statement.

Previously the company had offered cryptocurrency transactions, which can be pseudonymous, as a way to avoid discrimination in traditional banking.

Here’s more about social justice as corporate policy:


Why do companies keep caving to SJW’s?

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
Alejandro villanueva Antwon rose Intelwars Maurkice pouncey Minkah fitzpatrick NFL social justice Steelers helmet

Pittsburgh Steelers player says decision to honor Antwon Rose on helmet came from management, but team says otherwise

The decision by the Pittsburgh Steelers to honor a teen fatally shot by a police officer and allegedly involved in a drive-by shooting appears to have created disruption and controversy.

Two Steelers players have already declared that they will not pay tribute to the Antwon Rose Jr., and now another Pittsburgh player revealed that management decided who the players would honor on their helmet. Previously, the team said that players and coaches were united on the name that would be written on the back of helmets, but it seems that might not have been the case.

During a Zoom call with media on Thursday, Steelers safety Minkah Fitzpatrick was asked about the team’s decision to use helmets to deliver social justice signaling. Fitzpatrick said that the decision to honor Rose came from the Steelers’ front office and not players.

“It was made from people upstairs and everything else like that,” Fitzpatrick said in the interview. “Don’t know exactly who. Don’t know exactly how. But we did. We knew that we were going to have somebody on the back of our helmets, and it wasn’t exactly clear on what it was going to be. It was mostly made by everyone upstairs.”

This contradicts what the Steelers said earlier this week about the helmet gesture.

“This year the NFL is allowing players to wear helmet decals to honor victims of systemic racism,” the Steelers website stated on Monday. “Players could select the name of an individual to wear on their helmet and the Steelers players and coaches united as one to wear a single name on the back of their helmets and hats for the entire 2020 season — Antwon Rose Jr.”

When the Steelers played the New York Giants on Monday night, the players had the name “Antwon Rose Jr.” on the back of their helmets. All the Steelers had Rose’s name on their helmets except for Pittsburgh offensive lineman and West Point graduate Alejandro Villanueva. He decided to honor the late Alwyn Cashe, a soldier who saved fellow servicemen and was posthumously awarded the Silver Star Medal, the third-highest award for valor in combat.

On Thursday, Steelers center and co-captain Maurkice Pouncey announced that he would not be wearing Rose’s name on his helmet this season.

“I was given limited information on the situation regarding Antwon, and I was unaware of the whole story surrounding his death and what transpired during the trial following the tragedy,” Pouncey said. “I should have done more research to fully understand what occurred in its entirety.

“Moving forward, I will make my own decision about what to wear on the back of my helmet,” Pouncey added. “Make no mistake, I am against racism and I believe the best thing I can do is to continue helping repair relationships between the police and their communities. Systemic racism issues have occurred in our country for too long, and that needs to stop.”

Rose was reportedly involved in a drive-by shooting in 2018. Then-17-year-old Rose and his friend Zaijuan Hester were pulled over because they were in a vehicle that matched the description of a car that was used in a drive-by shooting that injured two people minutes earlier.

The two teens fled after they were pulled over by East Pittsburgh Police Officer Michael Rosfeld. The officer shot Rose three times. Rose died from the gunshot injuries.

Hester pleaded guilty to charges related to the drive-by shooting, and was sentenced to 6 to 22 years in prison. Rosfeld was acquitted by a jury and found not guilty of homicide charges in the death of Rose.

Share
Categories
Intelwars looting Nancy Pelosi Protests Riots social justice

Nancy Pelosi condemns rioting as public sentiment turns against unrest: ‘They should be prosecuted’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) spoke forcefully Thursday against the riots that have been occurring with regularity for nearly four months in cities all over the country, as polling continues to show public sentiment souring on the unrest.

Pelosi and other Democrats have spent much of the last few months criticizing President Donald Trump’s use of federal law enforcement to stop violence in places like Chicago and Portland, Oregon.

“We support peaceful demonstrations, we participate in them, they are part of the essence of our democracy,” Pelosi said. “That does not include looting, starting fires, or rioting. They should be prosecuted. That is lawlessness. I’m very proud that Joe Biden has presented the clarity that, making a distinction that I don’t think our colleagues quite understand but the American people do and a poll released today said that the American people support congressional Democrats over President Trump in terms of dealing with the issue of crime in our country for all of their misrepresentations.”

Pelosi also claimed that voters support congressional Democrats to handle crime more than they trust President Trump.

Protests began in late May after George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis Police Department officers while resisting them after they attempted to arrest him for allegedly using counterfeit money at a local store.

Anti-police protests sprung up all over the country, often devolving into dangerous riots at night time. Protesters in Seattle took over blocks of the city and occupied a police precinct. Further police violence incidents, such as the shooting of Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta and the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, sparked renewed protests and violence.

Portland, which has long dealt with general unrest often inflamed by Antifa, has seen some form of protests in the streets for more than 100 days in a row. Former GOP congressman Trey Gowdy criticized Pelosi for her late condemnation of the ongoing violence.

“You can be 100% behind law and order and law enforcement, or you can be, in her case, 100 days behind them,” Gowdy said on Fox News. “It’s been about 100 days. In that time, she had time to compare cops to stormtroopers. She had time to call [House Minority Leadaer] Kevin McCarthy the ‘enemy of the state.’ She had time to get her hair done … but she had no time to defend law enforcement until the polls started tightening.”

Share
Categories
Football Helmet names Intelwars Maurkice pouncey NFL Nfl helmets Pittsburgh steelers social justice

Pittsburgh Steelers co-captain goes against NFL, will decide who he honors on his helmet

Pittsburgh Steelers center and co-captain Maurkice Pouncey announced that he would decide whose name is on the back of his helmet, not who the Steelers or the NFL tell him to honor. Pouncey is going against the league, which is honoring a victim of a police shooting, who was also reportedly involved in a drive-by shooting.

On Monday, the Steelers announced that every player would wear a helmet decal honoring Antwon Rose Jr.

“This year the NFL is allowing players to wear helmet decals to honor victims of systemic racism,” the Steelers website stated. “Players could select the name of an individual to wear on their helmet and the Steelers players and coaches united as one to wear a single name on the back of their helmets and hats for the entire 2020 season – Antwon Rose Jr.”

“On the night of June 19, 2018, the car Antwon Rose Jr., who is black, was a passenger in was pulled over by the East Pittsburgh Police,” the website reads. “While the driver was being handcuffed on suspicion of being involved in an incident that happened earlier that evening, a frightened Rose fled from the car. The cell phone video a bystander captured showed Rose running, and then you could hear gunshots and see as he was fatally shot in the back three times by a white East Pittsburgh Police Officer.”

The Steelers played the New York Giants on Monday night. The Pittsburgh players, including Pouncey, had the name “Antwon Rose Jr.” on the back of their helmets. On Thursday, Pouncey announced that he regretted wearing the tribute and would not wear Antwon Rose’s name on the back of his helmet for the rest of the season.

“I was given limited information on the situation regarding Antwon, and I was unaware of the whole story surrounding his death and what transpired during the trial following the tragedy,” said Pouncey, who was named the Steelers’ 2019 nominee as the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year award for “exceptional character and work off the football field.” “I should have done more research to fully understand what occurred in its entirety.”

“My work with the police, both in Pittsburgh and back home in Florida, is well documented,” the Pittsburgh lineman said. “I don’t always feel the need to highlight what I do with the police departments, but I also want to make sure they understand I inadvertently supported a cause of which I did not fully comprehend the entire background of the case. I take responsibility for not doing more investigating into something that is sensitive to the community and his family, but it is a lesson learned as it relates to political issues that occur every day in our society.

“Moving forward, I will make my own decision about what to wear on the back of my helmet,” Pouncey continued. “Make no mistake, I am against racism and I believe the best thing I can do is to continue helping repair relationships between the police and their communities. Systemic racism issues have occurred in our country for too long, and that needs to stop.”

“My focus will continue to be on helping the police in our communities, and I will support making any necessary changes to help those efforts,” the statement concluded.

The “whole story” that Pouncey is alluding to is that the Steelers did not mention that Rose was reportedly in a vehicle matching the description of a car that had been involved in a drive-by shooting that happened about 10 minutes before Rose was shot. Rose’s friend, Zaijuan Hester, allegedly fired a gun from the rear passenger side of a gold Chevy Cruz, shooting Thomas Cole Jr. in the abdomen, and hitting William Ross in the leg with shrapnel, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Officer Michael Rosfeld pulled over the vehicle on suspicion of carrying out the drive-by shooting. A witness video of the incident shows Hester and Rose run away from the officer. Rosfeld fired three shots, all of them hit Rose; striking him in the face, elbow, and the back, according to Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen Zappala Jr.

Rose was unarmed at the time of the shooting, according to police. Daniel Wolfe, a scientist with the Allegheny County Medical Examiner’s Office, said gunshot residue was found on Rose’s hand. But it could have come from Rosfeld’s weapon.

There were two guns on the floor of the car. There was a 9 mm Glock 26 handgun with 16 rounds in the magazine that holds 17 rounds. The other gun was a .40-caliber Glock 22 with a live round in the chamber and an extended magazine with 18 rounds.

Rose had an empty 9 mm ammunition magazine in his pocket, which matched the 9 mm pistol in the car. Shell casings found at the scene of the drive-by shooting matched the .40-caliber Glock 22 pistol, according to police.

Hester, who was 17 at the time of the crime, pleaded guilty on March 15, 2019, to charges related to the drive-by shooting, including three counts of aggravated assault and four firearms charges. In exchange for the plea, prosecutors dropped a charge of attempted homicide. Hester was sentenced to 6 to 22 years in prison.

Rosfeld testified that he thought one of the teens had turned and pointed a gun at him. On March 22, Rosfeld was acquitted by a jury and found not guilty of homicide charges in the death of Antwon Rose.

For the past three seasons, Pouncey donated Steelers tickets to the Pittsburgh police so they could take young people from city neighborhoods to football games and enjoy a pregame tailgate party. Pouncey hopes the experience can build trust between young people and police officers.

“I think sometimes the message gets blurred some with some of the incidents,” Pouncey said. “The things we do in the community, and how Pittsburgh is, how involved they are in bringing up the youth and making sure everyone knows they do a lot of great things. To bring up the kids that way is awesome.”

“This gives the kids a chance to see the police beyond the uniform,” Pouncey added. “They are human. They are great people. They have kids and family members too. Just because they wear a badge you shouldn’t look at them a certain way. They are a lot of great people that help with a lot of great causes.”

Pouncey wasn’t the only Pittsburgh player to object to honoring Antwon Rose Jr. on their helmet. Fellow Steelers offensive lineman Alejandro Villanueva paid tribute to Alwyn Cashe, a U.S. Army sergeant who died while serving in Iraq in 2005.

Cashe was in a Bradley Fighting Vehicle that hit an improvised explosive device during a patrol in Samarra, Iraq. He exited the vehicle with minor injuries, but when he saw there were injured soldiers in the burning vehicle, he went back to save them.

Cashe helped to rescue all six soldiers from the fiery vehicle and extracted the body of an interpreter killed by the IED. He was able to save the soldiers while under small arms fire. Cashe suffered severe burns on 72% of his body. He succumbed to his injuries and died on Nov. 8, 2005, at the San Antonio Military Medical Center in Texas. Cashe was posthumously awarded the Silver Star.

The NFL has said that only pre-approved names could appear on helmets and would be reserved for victims of racial injustice. Cashe was not on the NFL’s pre-approved list.

The mother of Antwon Rose, Michelle Kenney, criticized Villanueva for not wearing her son’s name on his helmet.

“The Pittsburgh Steelers took a team vote. Obviously one person didn’t like the results so they chose to do something different,” Kenney wrote on Facebook. “I have nothing against vets and absolutely appreciate everything that they have done and continue to do for us. But this one person showed us exactly who he is and obviously he didn’t approve of how the vote turned out.”

In July, Pittsburgh Steelers defensive end Stephon Tuitt said that he would not be kneeling during the national anthem. “I’m not kneeling for the flag and screw anybody who have [sic] a problem with that,” he said.

Share
Categories
army veteran Football Intelwars IRAQ NFL police shooting social justice

NFL player covers name of police shooting victim on helmet in favor of Army vet killed in Iraq — and shooting victim’s mother is irate

Pittsburgh Steelers offensive lineman Alejandro Villanueva is no stranger to controversy.

You might recall almost exactly three years ago when Villanueva — a former Army Ranger who served three tours in Afghanistan — stood alone on the field for the national anthem while the rest of the team stayed in the locker room.

It was the fall of 2017, and President Donald Trump — barely a year into his first term — was angry at players taking a knee in protest of police brutality against minorities, a movement that began the previous season with then-San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick.

Prior to Villanueva standing on the field for the national anthem, Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin said his entire team would stay in the locker room to help them avoid politics. The next day Villanueva said he regretted his gesture because it made the rest of his team look bad.

Now what?

It’s now the fall of 2020, and football players taking a knee for the national anthem seems decidedly mild compared to the strident social justice stances professional athletes, teams, and leagues are taking in the wake of recent minority deaths at the hands of police and the wave of protests that have gripped the country.

In that vein, the NFL has allowed players to wear helmet decals honoring victims of “systemic racism,” CBS Sports reported, adding that the Steelers decided as a team to honor for an entire season police shooting victim Antwon Rose Jr. — a black teenager shot in the back by a white police officer in Pittsburgh in 2018 after he ran from a pulled-over vehicle. The network said the now-former officer was charged with murder, but a jury found him not guilty in March 2019.

But Villanueva had something different in mind.

For the Steelers’ game against the New York Giants on Monday, he covered Rose’s name on the back of his helmet in favor of the name Alwyn Cashe, an Army sergeant who died after trying to rescue soldiers from a burning vehicle in Iraq in 2005, CBS Sports said.

Tomlin said Tuesday he gave Villanueva permission to break ranks with his teammates and that it was “in line with everything we’ve said about participating in social justice this offseason,” TribLive reported.

“As an organization, and myself as the head coach of the organization, we’re going to support our players however they chose to participate and express themselves, or to not participate or not express themselves, as long as they do so thoughtfully and with class,” Tomlin also said, according to CBS Sports, adding that Villanueva’s choice didn’t warrant an explanation.

Shooting victim’s mom is angry

It appears, however, that Rose’s mother wants an explanation — because she isn’t happy with what Villanueva did.

“The Pittsburgh Steelers took a team vote,” Michelle Kenney wrote on Facebook, according to TribLive. “Obviously, one person didn’t like the results, so they chose to do something different.”

Kenney had praised the team for choosing to place her son’s name on their helmets, saying it “means more to me than anything,” but that feeling appears to be gone.

“I have nothing against vets and absolutely appreciate everything that they have done and continue to do for us,” Kenney also wrote, TribLive said. “But this one person showed us exactly who he is, and obviously he didn’t approve of how the vote turned out.”

Rose’s mother also wrote that she will use what she deemed as “negative press” as motivation to “hold the Pittsburgh Steelers even more accountable,” the outlet reported.

“Yes, I believe in second chances, but as we all know I believe in putting in the work and that’s how I base my collaborations,” Kenney wrote, according to TribLive. “They came to me as a team/organization and I don’t care how good of an individual you are, if you are not a TEAM player, then maybe you are playing for the wrong team.”

Share
Categories
Colin Kaepernick Eric reid Intelwars National anthem kneeling NFL social justice

Colin Kaepernick is not a fan of the NFL’s social justice pandering, calls it ‘propaganda’

Former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who is now a full-time activist, does not approve of the NFL’s social justice presentations, even though they are a progression of the national anthem kneeling protest he started in 2016.

Kaepernick questioned the league’s sincerity and motives in purporting to care for black lives and racial justice, while Eric Reid, Kaepernick’s former teammate, is not on a team roster.

“While the NFL runs propaganda about how they care about Black Life, they are still actively blackballing Eric Reid for fighting for the Black community,” Kaepernick wrote on Twitter on Sunday. “Eric set 2 franchise records last year, and is one of the best defensive players in the league.”

Reid was one of the first players to kneel with Kaepernick during the national anthem when they were teammates on the San Francisco 49ers in 2016. Reid played for the Carolina Panthers in 2019, recording 130 total tackles, 97 solo tackles, and four sacks, playing and starting in all 16 games.

Reid signed a three-year contract extension with the Panthers in February 2019, but was cut in March 2020. Reporting on Reid’s departure indicated that Reid was cut due to the size of his contract. The team also traded quarterback Cam Newton and parted ways with star tight end Greg Olsen.

At the time of his release, Reid did not indicate a belief that there was anything nefarious about the transaction.

“It’s been a pleasure Carolina!” Reid posted the day he was cut. “I enjoyed my time and the support I received from the fans, media, teammates, and staff there will be remembered. Looking forward to furthering my career in another city!”

In his tweet, Kaepernick cites a Deadspin article that claims, without evidence, that Reid is being actively blackballed by owners and the league, who are colluding to keep him unsigned.

Reid was a part of a collusion grievance against the NFL that was launched in 2017 by Kaepernick. The two players settled that grievance for a total of less than $10 million. Due to confidentiality agreements associated with that settlement, we may never know more detail about the situation, and Reid himself may be legally prevented from speaking on it.

Kaepernick has claimed an interest in returning to the NFL, and Nike, which sponsors Kaepernick, has run a #BringBackKap campaign online. However, Kaepernick has not played since 2016, and there is no indication that teams have interest in him, especially after the debacle surrounding his league-arranged tryout last year.

Share
Categories
Gender Gender is a social construct Gender reveal parties Intelwars leftism social justice Social Media Trevor Noah Videos

Trevor Noah says gender reveal parties are dangerous, should only happen when kids are old enough to choose gender. Ted Cruz hits back with savage burn.

“The Daily Show” host and comedian Trevor Noah says gender reveal parties should be obsolete, as children clearly aren’t able to choose their genders as babies.

What are the details?

In a Tuesday monologue, Noah pointed to the California fire sparked by pyrotechnics at a gender reveal party. The fire, dubbed the El Dorado Fire, has burned more than 13,000 acres at the time of this writing.

“At this point, ‘gender reveal party’ is now one of the most dangerous terrorist organizations,” Noah joked during the monologue. “It’s ISIS, al-Qaeda, Taylor Swift fans, and gender reveals parties.”

The Comedy Central host added, “Aside from all the damage it can cause, celebrating a baby’s genitalia is starting to feel very outdated. Given everything we’re learning about gender, gender reveal parties should only happen when the child is old enough to know their actual gender — and to pitch in some cash for the fire damage.”

He also suggested that parents “do something that helps the situation” following the fire, suggesting that expectant parents attempt to douse the El Dorado fire with pink-colored water if the child is a girl, or blue-tinted water if the child is a boy.

In response, Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) said that many liberal men simply “never grow balls.”

In a Friday tweet, Cruz on Twitter linked a tweet from The Daily Wire, which reported that Noah was apparently “offended” by gender reveal parties.

He wrote, “A fair point. Many liberal males never grow balls[.]”

‘Nothing less than child abuse’

Cruz has been outspoken about his stance on biological gender, children, and parenting, and in 2019, said that parents allowing children to transition genders was a “horrifying & tragic” notion to behold.

In a tweet, the Texas Republican wrote, “This is horrifying & tragic. For a parent to subject such a young child to life-altering hormone blockers to medically transition their sex is nothing less than child abuse.”

Share
Categories
Houston Texans Intelwars Kansas city chiefs National Anthem NFL NFL ratings Nfl week 1 social justice

NFL sees double-digit ratings drop for season opener loaded with social justice activism

The NFL’s season-opening game between the Super Bowl champion Kansas City Chiefs and the Houston Texans drew disappointing TV ratings fueling continued questions about whether increased political activism in sports is driving fans away.

Preliminary Nielsen ratings show that 16.4 million people tuned in to the Thursday night primetime game, which is a 16% decrease from the number of people who watched last season’s opener between the Green Bay Packers and the Chicago Bears.

Ratings in professional sports have been down since returning from their coronavirus-related hiatus, despite people being more likely to be stuck at home and having been deprived of sports on TV for months. Some fans have expressed a dislike of overt social justice demonstrations that have taken over in football and basketball.

The NFL featured social justice messages in the end zones, a playing of the black national anthem before the game, and players locking arms before the game as social justice messages were broadcast on the scoreboard. And even those efforts were further politicized by the Texans, who stayed in the locker room while the national anthems were played as a protest against “empty gestures.”

There weren’t many fans at the game due to social distancing for COVID-19, but some of the fans in attendance booed players during a moment of silence before the game, apparently displeased with the social justice presentation.

The NBA playoff ratings during the first round were alarmingly low, down 27% from 2019 and 40% from 2018. The NBA’s social justice displays have been even more ubiquitous than the NFL’s. “Black Lives Matter” is painted on the court in large letters for every game, and players display social justice messages on the back of their jerseys while coaches sport “Racial Justice” badges on their shirts.

A recent Harris Poll found that politics has been a top reason people are turning away from the NBA:

A new Harris Poll backs Trump’s critique of the NBA, with 39% of sports fans saying they are watching fewer games. And the chief reason why? Politics. The longtime polling agency surveyed nearly 2,000 people over the weekend and gave people ten options to choose from on why they are watching less basketball.

“The league has become too political” was the clear choice for the decline, with 38% of respondents. “Boring without fans” captured 28% of the vote while the NBA’s association with China caused 19% of sports fans to turn the dial, another nod to a league Trump labeled a “political organization” last week after players boycotted games in response to a police officer shooting Jacob Blake seven times in the back in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

The poll found that Republicans were more likely to be turned off by the league’s politics that Democrats.

Share
Categories
Intelwars NFL NFL ratings Roger Goodell social justice

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell ducks question about national anthem, isn’t concerned about social justice hurting ratings

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell isn’t worried that the league’s heavy social justice emphasis for the upcoming season will hurt television ratings, despite evidence that some fans have been turned off by the NBA’s demonstrations and protests, Goodell told CNBC.

The NFL has long dominated professional sports television ratings in the United States, but there was some belief in past years, particularly in 2017, that national anthem kneeling protests and the controversy surrounding them hurt the league’s ratings. Now that the NFL is embracing, instead of opposing, overt social justice displays, Goodell isn’t concerned.

“Our ratings have really been the envy of every entertainment and sports property,” Goodell told CNBC. “We have the broadest audience, we have the best partners in all of television and media. We feel that ratings always go up and down for a variety of reasons.”

When asked about the issue of national anthem protests, which upset many football fans who believe those demonstrations are disrespectful to the country, Goodell deflected.

“I wonder if you would agree that your own stance as it pertains to social justice has evolved since Kaepernick first took that knee. Certainly your recent interviews suggest that,” CNBC host Carl Quintanilla said to Goodell. “I think some of our viewers want to know whether players will be on the field for the anthem, and whether you as a league and the ownership are willing to withstand any pushback if in fact we do see players take knees.”

“I would tell you that all of us, hopefully, are evolving and learning—we should be—and we all should realize that we have to do more,” Goodell responded. “I’m proud of what our league has done. I said it several months ago that we should’ve listened to our players earlier and been able to understand the things that were going on in our communities. We’re seeing that play out on television sets across the country. They have been happening in our communities for years—decades—and we have to end it.”

Goodell has fully embraced social justice activism by players in recent months, especially since the death of George Floyd in May. He said he was wrong for not listening to and understanding what players were protesting in previous years, and now the league is actively participating in social justice activism. From ESPN:

The NFL is planning extensive content around social injustice for Week 1 of the regular season, sources told ESPN.

Among options discussed by the league and players union, according to a source involved: Players reading personalized poems and delivering first-person vignettes based on experience with social injustice. These stories could be incorporated into game-day broadcasts.

This is in addition to recognizing victims of police brutality on the backs of helmets and playing or performing what’s known as the Black national anthem, “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” before the season-opening games, as ESPN senior NFL writer Jason Reid reported in July.

(H/T The Daily Wire)

Share
Categories
Helmet padding Intelwars national-football-league NFL police brutality social justice Systemic racism

NFL helmets will feature names of victims of police violence and systemic racism this season

The NFL, once openly opposed to overt social justice or political demonstrations, will reportedly allow players to put the name of a victim of police brutality or systemic racism on the back of their helmets this season, according to Pro Football Talk.

Mike Florio writes:

It’s a fairly thick white strip, where multiple organizations currently print the names of their teams. The names of specific persons will be easy to see when TV cameras capture close-up images of players on the field.

The names will come from an approved list, with names like George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbery among the possibilities.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has softened his stance toward social justice issues in recent months, notably lamenting the fact that he didn’t listen more to former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick about the issues he was protesting by kneeling during the national anthem.

ESPN reported over the weekend that the NFL was planning “extensive content” around social justice for the season’s opening week of games.

The black national anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing” will be performed before games, and the end zones will feature messages of “End Racism” and “It Takes All of Us.”

Game day broadcasts may include players reading personal poems or telling person stories of their experiences with social injustice or racism.

At least one team, the Arizona Cardinals, has considered a Week 1 boycott of games in protest of the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, ESPN reported.

The NBA has put forward the most overt social justice demonstrations of all the major American professional sports leagues, with players sporting league-approved social justice messages on the back of their jerseys, ranging from “Black Lives Matter,” to “Group Economics.” The words “Black Lives Matter” are featured on the courts during games.

That focus on political activism may be turning some viewers off from the league, however. Despite a presumably strong appetite for sports after the hiatus caused by COVID-19, the NBA’s ratings have been disappointing during its playoff season.

“People are angry about it … they don’t want — they have enough politics with guys like me, they don’t need more,” President Donald Trump said of the league’s struggling ratings, according to the Washington Times. “The NBA is in trouble. I think it’s in big trouble, bigger trouble than they understand.”

Share
Categories
CNN Intelwars Protests Republican National Convention Riots Rob davidson social distancing social justice

CNN guest says COVID-19 isn’t as big a concern for social justice protests because racism is a ‘public health crisis’

While discussing social distancing on CNN, Dr. Rob Davidson said that the lack of COVID-19 precautions at social justice protests aren’t as concerning as the crowd at the White House for President Donald Trump’s Republican National Convention speech, because racism is a public health issue.

Members of the media heavily criticized President Trump for allowing 1,500 people to sit in close quarters outside the White House for his Thursday night speech, citing the risk of COVID-19 spread since attendees weren’t required to be tested for the virus, and very few people wore masks.

On Friday, however, thousands of people marched in Washington, D.C., in protest of police brutality against minorities. The protest was labeled as a “March on Washington” with the official title, “Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks,” a reference to the Minneapolis Police Department killing of George Floyd.

Here’s what Dr. Davidson had to say about the RNC gathering:

“I was very concerned about the White House event last night, 1,500 people packed shoulder-to-shoulder, the head of the White House coronavirus task force in attendance without a mask, with his family and his elderly mother without a mask, and it’s concerning. We know people weren’t tested, only people in direct contact with President Trump had tests done. So I think we are going to see cases come out of that, and it’s just modeling bad behavior.”

And here’s what he had to say about the protest:

“Now when you juxtapose that with what’s going on in Washington, D.C. right now, people mostly wearing masks. Now true there is social distancing issues, however this is a public health crisis they are marching against. Systemic racism has taken so many lives in this country throughout our history. … I just think that when you’re marching against a public health emergency, you do every risk mitigation procedure you can, but we understand that you have to do the risk-benefit analysis, and the folks there are doing something very important today.”

Davidson draws the distinction that many protesters are wearing masks. However, one of the greatest concerns public health experts have consistently raised about mask use is that they fear people who wear masks will then neglect social distancing, leading to more spread of the virus.

Share
Categories
Anti-racism Intelwars NFL Ryan tannehill social justice Tennessee titans

NFL team cancels practice, tells media ‘This country is founded upon racist ideas’

The NFL’s Tennessee Titans canceled practice Thursday and instead held a virtual news conference during which quarterback Ryan Tannehill said the United States is “founded upon racist ideas,” according to the Tennessean.

With the entire team standing behind them, Tannehill and safety Kevin Byard explained why they decided not to practice, and spoke about the changes they want to see.

“We feel that with all the recent events that’s happened in our country, not only just this year, not only the past year, but the past hundreds of years, we decided that it’s time to take a stand today,” Byard said. We feel that with this moment right here, and today, with my brother Ryan [Tannehill] standing next to me and all my brothers standing behind me, we wanted to show solidarity and be unified, and say that we’re tired.”

Byard referenced police brutality against black people, and expressed concern about the environment his young children would grow up in.

“We’re sick and tired of seeing the things that’s been going on, on social media for the entertainment,” Byard continued. “Seeing our black brothers and sisters be murdered by police like it’s nothing, it’s time for a change. … I just had a son, just Sunday. I have a 1-year-old daughter, and I have no clue what I’m going to tell them or what kind of world that they’re going to grow up in, in this country.”

Tannehill spoke after Byard, and called for an end to centuries of systemic oppression in the U.S.

“This country is founded upon racist ideas with slaves being brought here from the day of foundation, and those ideas have persisted throughout the last hundreds of years, and it’s going to take time until we can get those all out,” Tannehill said. “But we’re tired of it. We’re tired of dealing with the systematic oppression. We’re tired of dealing with excessive force. We’re tired of seeing black men and women die in situations where they should be walking home and spending the night with their families. It’s sickening.”

Athletes in the NBA, MLB, and MLS refused to play scheduled games this week after the police shooting of Jacob Blake on Sunday in Kenosha, Wisconsin. The NBA considered cancelling its entire postseason in protest, although it eventually opted to resume play.

Blake was shot seven times in the back during an altercation with police, who had been called by his girlfriend. The girlfriend accused Blake of stealing her keys and refusing to leave. Police shot Blake as he reached into his car, where they say they found a knife on the floor.

Share
Categories
Anthem kneelers Colin Kaepernick Intelwars National Anthem Protest NFL Roger Goodell social justice

Roger Goodell regrets not listening to Kaepernick more, says anthem kneelers are not unpatriotic

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said he regrets not having more dialogue with former quarterback Colin Kaepernick about social justice issues and said he now understands that players who kneel during the national anthem aren’t being unpatriotic, ESPN reported.

What did he say?

“These are not people who are unpatriotic,” Goodell told ESPN’s Emmanuel Acho on the video series “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man.” “They’re not disloyal. They’re not against our military. In fact, many of those guys were in the military, and they’re a military family. And what they were trying to do is exercise their right to bring attention to something that needs to get fixed. And that misrepresentation of who they were and what they were doing was the thing that really gnawed at me.”

Acho asked Goodell what he might say in a public apology to Kaepernick, and Goodell cited regret that he was not able to have more conversations with the player who started the social justice protest of kneeling during the national anthem. Goodell said the league should have listened more and really understood what Kaepernick and other players were protesting.

“That’s where we should have listened sooner,” Goodell said. “And that’s where we should have been in there with them, understanding and figuring out what we can do as the NFL.”

What is Kaepernick up to?

Kaepernick has spent the last several years as a high-profile social justice activist. His experience, which many characterize as having been blackballed from the NFL for his protests, has led to a lucrative book deal and several television and documentary opportunities.

The former quarterback stands as an influential voice and symbol in social justice circles, and his statement in the days following the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, has proven to be fitting for the unrest that has occurred since.

“When civility leads to death, revolting is the only logical reaction,” Kaepernick wrote in a May 28 tweet that is pinned to the top of his profile. “The cries for peace will rain down, and when they do, they will land on deaf ears, because your violence has brought this resistance. We have the right to fight back!”

There have been protests and riots across the United States almost every night for the past three months, and the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, on Sunday has sparked new riots in that city the past two nights.

Share
Categories
Black Lives Matter BLM Intelwars Say her name Sen. kelly loeffler social justice Video Wnba

GOP Sen. Kelly Loeffler rips WNBA — including players on the team she owns — for showing up to games in shirts backing her opponent

Georgia Republican Sen. Kelly Loeffler is not a fan of the WNBA’s decision to have players sport “Black Lives Matter” and “Say Her Name” on their jerseys, and she let the league commissioner know it.

The fact that a U.S. senator is publicly calling out the WNBA is interesting enough. What makes Loeffler’s complaint carry more weight is she’s a co-owner of the WNBA’s Atlanta Dream.

The senator’s statements set off WNBA players, including members of her own team, who have now taken to wearing T-shirts supporting Loeffler’s Democratic challenger to their games and demanding that the league strip her of her ownership.

And now Loeffler is blasting her players for their latest antics.

What’s going on?

Earlier this summer, Loeffler wrote a letter to WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert asking that the league reverse its decision to emblazon team jerseys with “Black Lives Matter” and “Say Her Name” and replace the statements with American flags, the New York Post noted.

Following the senator’s request that the league change its plans to spread the Black Lives Matter messaging, the WNBA players union
tweeted, “E-N-O-U-G-H! O-U-T!” and insisted that the league remove Loeffler as co-owner of the Dream.

Now WNBA players — including members of Loeffler’s team — are wearing “Vote Warnock” shirts to promote the candidacy of the GOP senator’s Democratic opponent, the Rev. Raphael Warnock.

According to
ESPN, the pro-Warnock shirts are more than just a few upset players making a statement. Rather they are part of a plan by the WNBA’s executive committee to respond to Loeffler’s statements because, as Dream center Elizabeth Williams, who tweeted a photo of herself donning a “Vote Warnock” shirt, told the outlet, “for effective change to happen, there has to be policy changes. And so if we’re going to sit here and talk about wanting justice reform, part of that is making sure that we have officials in office that understand that.”

Loeffler responded to the T-shirt campaign in a
statement on her campaign website Wednesday morning, blasting the WNBA and the country’s “out of control cancel culture” that tries to silence and shame anyone who might disagree with them:

This is just more proof that the out of control cancel culture wants to shut out anyone who disagrees with them. It’s clear that the league is more concerned with playing politics than basketball, and I stand by what I wrote in June:

We come together around sports, but promoting a political agenda divides us rather than unites us. The lives of every African American matter, and there’s no place for racism in our country. But I oppose the BLM political organization due to its radical ideas and Marxist foundations, which include defunding the police and eroding the nuclear family. On the other hand, our flag represents our values of freedom and equality for all. If we can’t unite behind our flag, much less the national anthem during this struggle, then what keeps us together? It’s sad to see that there’s more interest in tearing our country apart than in solutions that bring us together. I’ll continue to defend American values and our flag, because this is not a game – it’s the future of our country.

Who’s idea was it to make shirts?

Williams said Seattle Storm guard Sue Bird was the first to come up with the idea of campaigning for Loeffler’s opponent.

Asked by
ESPN about the move, Bird said:

This was a situation where given what was said in regards to the owner of Atlanta and how, basically, she came out against a lot of what the women in our league stand for, I think was emotionally tough for a lot of the women in our league to hear that. But very quickly we started to realize that this was only happening for her political gain. This was something that she wanted. And the more noise we made, whether it was a tweet saying to get her out, that was just playing into her hands.

I’m not some political strategist, but what I do know is that voting is important. And I think our league has always encouraged people to use their voices and to get out and vote.

More from Bird via ESPN:

Share
Categories
Alex villanueva Defund the police Intelwars Los Angeles Police social justice

LA County could redistribute nearly $1B from law enforcement to ‘social programs’

Los Angeles County residents will vote this November on whether to redistribute nearly $1 billion in funding from county law enforcement to “social programs.”

According to KTTV-TV reporter Bill Melugin, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to include the charter amendment on November’s ballot.

“It would strip $880 million away from Sheriff’s Department, court system, DA’s office, and redistribute it to low income areas/social programs,” Melugin reported. “Supervisor Kathryn Barger was the lone ‘no’ vote, saying this proposal was rushed, wasn’t transparent, had no feedback from stakeholders, and could result in job cuts to county employees as well as budget issues down the road. Other Supervisors say let the voters decide.”

The proposal, which has been dubbed “Reimagining L.A. County,” mandates that at least 10% of the county’s net cost be earmarked for “social programs,” according to Melugin.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said the program is not about defunding the police, but rather expanding the so-called social safety net, KTTV reported.

“It’s time to bring our budget into alignment with our actions, intentions and vision. The supervisors have said we want to move people from custody to care, and our constituents are pleading with us to expand housing and treatment options and stop relying on punitive, outdated law enforcement tactics,” she said.

If approved by voters, the program, whose goal is “to address the disproportionate impact of racial injustice,” would be fully implemented by June 2024.

More from KTTV:

If passed by voters, the charter amendment would allocate funds to be spent in a number of broad categories, including youth development programs, job training for low-income communities, access to capital for minority-owned businesses, rent assistance and affordable housing, community-based health services and jail diversion programs.

It would prohibit such funds being used for or redistributed through law enforcement or correctional agencies, including the District Attorney’s Office, but would not prohibit its use to cover costs related to trial courts. The ordinance cites only a percentage of “the county’s locally generated unrestricted revenues in the general fund,” not an absolute number.

Not surprisingly, the program would adversely impact public safety, L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva warned last week, explaining he would be forced to close several patrol stations in the county.

Share
Categories
Alex villanueva Defund the police Intelwars Los Angeles Police social justice

LA County could redistribute nearly $1B from law enforcement to ‘social programs’

Los Angeles County residents will vote this November on whether to redistribute nearly $1 billion in funding from county law enforcement to “social programs.”

According to KTTV-TV reporter Bill Melugin, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to include the charter amendment on November’s ballot.

“It would strip $880 million away from Sheriff’s Department, court system, DA’s office, and redistribute it to low income areas/social programs,” Melugin reported. “Supervisor Kathryn Barger was the lone ‘no’ vote, saying this proposal was rushed, wasn’t transparent, had no feedback from stakeholders, and could result in job cuts to county employees as well as budget issues down the road. Other Supervisors say let the voters decide.”

The proposal, which has been dubbed “Reimagining L.A. County,” mandates that at least 10% of the county’s net cost be earmarked for “social programs,” according to Melugin.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said the program is not about defunding the police, but rather expanding the so-called social safety net, KTTV reported.

“It’s time to bring our budget into alignment with our actions, intentions and vision. The supervisors have said we want to move people from custody to care, and our constituents are pleading with us to expand housing and treatment options and stop relying on punitive, outdated law enforcement tactics,” she said.

If approved by voters, the program, whose goal is “to address the disproportionate impact of racial injustice,” would be fully implemented by June 2024.

More from KTTV:

If passed by voters, the charter amendment would allocate funds to be spent in a number of broad categories, including youth development programs, job training for low-income communities, access to capital for minority-owned businesses, rent assistance and affordable housing, community-based health services and jail diversion programs.

It would prohibit such funds being used for or redistributed through law enforcement or correctional agencies, including the District Attorney’s Office, but would not prohibit its use to cover costs related to trial courts. The ordinance cites only a percentage of “the county’s locally generated unrestricted revenues in the general fund,” not an absolute number.

Not surprisingly, the program would adversely impact public safety, L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva warned last week, explaining he would be forced to close several patrol stations in the county.

Share
Categories
Anthem kneeling Black Lives Matter Intelwars National anthem protests NBA social justice

Commentary: Let’s end the absurdity surrounding anthem kneeling

You can kneel during the national anthem and still love America and support police officers. You can stand during the national anthem and still believe black lives matter and police brutality is wrong.

The primary narrative surrounding a peaceful protest should be the issue being protested, not an obsessive accounting of which individuals choose to participate and which ones don’t.

Everyone who kneels during the national anthem is not saying the same thing. Some of them are publicly expressing their opposition to police brutality. Some of them are protesting racial injustice in broader terms. Some are supporting Black Lives Matter. Maybe some of them actually do hate America. I imagine many, if not most of them, don’t really care and are just doing whatever it takes to not get criticized.

Everyone who stands during the national anthem isn’t saying the same thing. Most people stand during the national anthem because it’s just what you do during the national anthem. Some people are standing because they don’t want to get lumped in with Black Lives Matter, the organization. Most people who stand are probably not making a statement of protest against black people; they are just doing a normal thing.

It doesn’t take any particular courage to stand for the national anthem, or to kneel for the national anthem. There aren’t any real consequences for either choice. Let’s stop with the hero worship of people who make the choice we prefer.

It’s ridiculous to approach a black American who chooses to stand for the national anthem and ask him whether he believes in black lives matter. It’s actually a stupid question.

A movement seeking justice for black people is destined to fail when we start turning on each other. When a movement called “Black Lives Matter” begins attacking black people who don’t act a certain way, it has lost its way. To say “black lives matter” is a lie if it excludes black people who express themselves differently than the mainstream.

Sometimes basketball players just want to be basketball players, and they should be allowed to do that. The issue of race in America is complicated, and many professional athletes simply aren’t informed enough to have helpful thoughts on it. We should encourage them to learn, but not force them to be activists.

Sometimes basketball players want to be activists, and they should be allowed to do that. If they choose to take on that role, they should take care to be informed and wise in how they express themselves, because they will be held to account for their activism. It’s fair game if that’s a path they choose.

If you really like sports, but you can’t stand to watch games because some people don’t stand for the national anthem before the game starts, that’s a bit silly, but it’s your right to turn away. It’s worth asking, though, whether you hold other organizations to that same standard for them to earn your business, and if not, why that might be.

Our society is really going insane. It’s like we’re incapable of reasonableness and moderation and compromise. Everything is a battleground.

We need to get rid of a lot of bad police officers. We need to create more accountability at a lot of police departments. We need to get some incompetent political leaders out of office in the process. We need to support the police officers who are willing to put their lives on the line for the members of their communities every day. None of that has to be a contradiction.

We need to fight racial injustice. We need to correct any system, big or small, that reinforces racial inequality. We need to be angry when a black person is unnecessarily and unjustly killed by police. We need to be angry when a person of any race is unnecessarily and unjustly killed by police. We shouldn’t try to make every white person feel guilty for all the racism of history. None of that has to be a contradiction.

We have a pandemic that has killed more than 150,000 people in this country, and put tens of millions of others out of work. We have literal riots in the streets almost every night in some cities in this country. We’re heading for an election where no matter who wins, the losing side is almost surely going to claim the results are fraudulent. Whether someone stands or kneels during the national anthem before a basketball game shouldn’t be anywhere near the top of our list of concerns right now.

If our nation fails some day, historians may note that our demise was largely due to the fact that we spent so much of our time fighting about things that don’t matter, while failing to address the things that do. This doesn’t have to be our story, but we’ve got to find some common sense.

Share
Categories
Black Lives Matter Black lives matter mafia Fernando martinez Intelwars La bodeguita de mima Louisville Nulu social justice

Cuban immigrant says activist group using ‘mafia tactics’ to intimidate Louisville business owners

An activist group is threatening Louisville business owners with possible repercussions if they fail to submit to their list of social justice-related demands.

Phelix Crittenden, who is allegedly the “lead supply organizer for BLM Louisville chapter,” created a group called “Blacks Organizing Strategic Success.” Its website claims to be a “creative cooperative designed to level the playing field” and “empowering minorities with business resources & networking opportunities.”

Fernando Martinez, a partner of the Olé Restaurant Group, believes the group uses “mafia tactics” to intimidate Louisville business owners. Martinez, who is a Cuban immigrant, became incensed after his restaurant, as well as other businesses, were given a list of demands from the activist group.

Businesses in East Market District of downtown Louisville, also known as NuLu (New Louisville), were given a list of demands such as:

  • Adequately represent the Black population of Louisville by having a minimum of 23% Black staff
  • Purchase a minimum of 23% inventory from Black retailers or make a recurring monthly donation of 1.5% of net sales to a local Black nonprofit or organization
  • Require diversity and inclusion training for all staff members on a bi-annual basis
  • And display a visible sign that increases awareness and shows support for the reparations movement

The Blacks Organizing Strategic Success website created a “Social Justice Rating System,” where businesses are given a grade for how many of the demands they submit to. The organization gives businesses a sort of social credit score, “Ally,” “Complicit,” and “Failed.”

“We’re holding Louisville businesses accountable, and we’re starting in Nulu. We will give businesses the standard 25-30 days to remedy any violation,” the site states. “We will offer them a realistic opportunity & resources to raise their grade.”

If business owners who do not comply with the demands, “protesters would respond by launching negative reviews and social media posts about the businesses,” according to WDRB-TV.

“I hate the word demands,” Rick Murphy, the president of the NuLu Business Association, said. “It’s bullying, it’s mean. We look at what they’ve given us as goals. I don’t embrace demands from anyone. No one can demand something of me, particularly if they accompany that demand with some sort of threat or doing harm to businesses. Right now is the wrong time to try to do harm to businesses.”

Some NuLu business owners were happy to agree to the terms, including Angie Garner, who is the owner of Garner Narratives, an art gallery. Garner even signed a contract, “addressing the gentrification of Clarksdale with some modest steps forward.”

“I knew not to get distracted by any impulses toward hand-wringing and defensiveness, just get busy,” Garner told the Courier-Journal. “It’s important to stay clear that what matters is what happened to the people in Clarksdale, and what opportunities and resources can be made available to Black Louisvillians.”

“Maybe that history will help business owners here understand why it’s not nearly enough, just to be welcoming to Black people who are looking to spend money with them,” she said.

Murphy said that he believes the group’s demands are legitimate, adding that he and other business owners had failed the black community when it comes to making NuLu inclusive for everyone, according to the Courier-Journal.

“I as an individual and we as a group totally endorse what they want,” Murphy said. “We consider those valid goals that we hope to meet in the relatively near future.”

However, Martinez and other Cubans do not plan on giving in to the demands.

Martinez said several protesters presented him with the list of demands and warned that he “better put the letter on the door so your business is not f***ed with.”

“There comes a time in life that you have to make a stand and you have to really prove your convictions and what you believe in,” Martinez wrote on Facebook. “… All good people need to denounce this. How can you justified (sic) injustice with more injustice?”

Martinez responded that as a Cuban immigrant with black relatives, he does not need diversity training.

“Although our community has achieved great success in this city, we continue to miss our homeland, our neighborhoods we grew up in and our families we left behind. We did not want to leave all of those, but we had to,” Luis David Fuentes said. “We had to escape the socialist government that took away our grandparents’ private businesses in 1959 and continue to restrict our civil and political rights today.”

Fuentes said so many Cubans risked their lives for “freedom, respect, and prosperity” in America, but now these values are under attack “because of the diffusion and expansion of Marxist ideas.”

Martinez held a rally at his La Bodeguita de Mima restaurant on Sunday afternoon with American and Cuban flags displayed. Supporters held up signs that read “No 2 Socialism In America,” and “Justice 4 All.”

“La Bodeguita is open to everybody,” Martinez said on Sunday. “If you’re gay, this is your home. If you’re black, this is your home. If you’re white, this is your home. If you’re human, this is your home.”

“How can I be called a bigot and a racist when my family is black? When my son is gay?” he asked. “I’m the proud father of a gay son, and I’m gonna fight for him against anybody.”

Share
Categories
Adam silver Anthem kneeling Black Lives Matter Intelwars NBA social justice

NBA won’t enforce rule requiring players to stand for the national anthem, citing ‘unique circumstances’

While the NFL struggled for years to manage its national anthem kneeling controversy, including botched attempts to ban the protests, the NBA avoided the issue with an established rule requiring players to stand during the national anthem — a rule that the players followed without incident.

Things have changed, however, and now NBA Commissioner Adam Silver has made the decision not to enforce the rule, allowing entire teams to kneel during the anthem as a form of social justice protest.

“I respect our teams’ unified act of peaceful protest for social justice and under these unique circumstances will not enforce our long-standing rule requiring standing during the playing of our national anthem,” Silver said Thursday, according to the New York Times’ Marc Stein.

Many players and coaches knelt during the anthem Thursday and Friday, as teams played their first regular season games since the COVID-19 pandemic shut down U.S. professional sports in March.

In the past, it was noticeable and newsworthy when a player did not stand for the national anthem. Now, in the NBA, it’s more surprising to see a player choose to stand. That’s what Orlando Magic player Jonathan Isaac did Friday before his team’s game against the Brooklyn Nets.

While Isaac’s teammates got down on one knee wearing Black Lives Matter shirts, Isaac stood for the anthem while wearing only his game jersey.

TNT analyst Charles Barkley defended any player who chooses to stand.

“The national anthem means different things to different people,” Barkley said. “I’m glad these guys are unified. If people don’t kneel, they’re not a bad person. I want to make that perfectly clear. I’m glad they had unity, but if we have a guy who doesn’t want to kneel because the anthem means something to him, he should not be vilified.”

Isaac didn’t give a reason for his choice to stand, but he has commented on social justice issues in the past, including after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

“Just because we are in the position of being an NBA player, it doesn’t give us automatically an understanding or insight to issues that happen around us,” Isaac said in June. “But I think because we have the ear of so many it’s important for us to be diligent, to be vocal, but in a balanced way.”

Share