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Fairness in women's sports Intelwars Mark emmert NCAA Ncaa boycott threats Ted Cruz Transgender athletes

Sen. Cruz pressures NCAA president on threats to states that pass fairness in women’s sports laws

NCAA President Mark Emmert on Wednesday faced questions from Sen. Ted Cruz over his organization’s policy on transgender athletes and fairness in women’s sports.

Emmert appeared before the Senate Commerce Committee to testify as an expert witness during a hearing on college athlete compensation. But when it was Cruz’s turn to ask questions, the senator from Texas pressured the NCAA president on transgender issues and his organization’s threat to punish states that pass laws that prohibit male athletes who identify as transgender from competing in women’s sports.

“I am concerned about just how political the NCAA has gotten on the question of transgender athletes,” Cruz said.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has threatened to pull championship collegiate games from states that enact laws barring transgender athletes from playing on teams associated with their self-declared gender identity.

In a statement issued in April, the organization announced it “firmly and unequivocally supports the opportunity for transgender student-athletes to compete in college sports” and that “when determining where championships are held, NCAA policy directs that only locations where hosts can commit to providing an environment that is safe, healthy and free of discrimination should be selected.”

“That was a not remotely subtle threat for the NCAA to target and boycott any states where legislatures are acting to protect girls sports and women’s sports,” charged Cruz.

“Now, it used to not be controversial to observe that there are biological differences between boys and girls, and when it comes to athletics, there are, can be significant physical advantages for those who are born biologically male in terms of strength and size. And that’s why we have girls sports and boys sports and men’s sports and women’s sports in organized athletics. And the science continues to demonstrate that,” Cruz continued.

“Why does the NCAA think it is fair to girls or to women competing in sports to expect them to compete against individuals who were born biologically male? And is the NCAA concerned about some of the results we’re seeing, for example, Connecticut high school track where biological males are setting record after record after record in girls track and winning the championships,” he asked.

“Is that fair to the girls and to the women who had been competing in the sports?”

“Senator, first of all, as you point out, this is a very challenging issues and the member schools of the association have worked very hard to try and not make it a political issue,” Emmert replied, noting that the NCAA has attempted to align “as closely as possible” with what the USA and International Olympics policy is.

He explained that to strike a “balance” between what is “inclusive” and what is “fair,” “student athletes in NCAA competition who are transgendered women, for example, are allowed to compete but only after they’ve been under a doctor’s care for no less than a year and have had testosterone suppression treatments that have lowered their testosterone levels to be functional equivalent of a woman.”

Emmert added that in the example Cruz cited, the transgender athletes in question “would not have been allowed to compete in NCAA championships.”

“We’ve been constantly trying to stay abreast of the science and make sure that we’re striking a balance where we don’t put women athletes at a disadvantage while still trying to provide an inclusive environment,” Emmert said.

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Florida Intelwars NCAA Ron DeSantis Transgender sports

Ron DeSantis tells NCAA, ‘woke corporations’ where they can shove their threats over transgender sports law

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis (R) revealed Tuesday exactly where the NCAA and “woke corporations” can shove their money and events if they don’t like Florida’s effort to protect girl’s sports from transgender athletes.

What is the background?

On Tuesday, DeSantis signed into law the “Fairness in Women’s Sports Act,” which prohibits biological males who identify as transgender females from competing on female sports teams, both in high school and at the collegiate level.

The purpose of the law, according to DeSantis, is to protect the integrity of women’s sports.

“The bill that we’re doing today will ensure fairness for women athletes for years to come in the state of Florida,” DeSantis said. “It says that athletic teams or sports that are designated for females are open to females. And we’re going to go based off biology.”

How did DeSantis respond to corporate pressure?

Speaking with Fox News host Tucker Carlson, DeSantis said he called the bluff of organizations like the NCAA.

The NCAA, the sanctioning body for most collegiate athletics, threatened to withdraw events from states that pass laws preventing biological males who identify as transgender females from competing in women’s organized sports.

Recalling his response to the NCAA’s threats, DeSantis made it clear the pressure would not work. “To hell with these events,” DeSantis said.

“I remember the NCAA put out a statement saying any state that enacts this, we’re not going to hold events there. So I called the speaker of the House in Florida and I said, ‘Did you hear what they said?’ And he’s like, ‘Yeah.’ I said, ‘We definitely got to get this done.’ You can’t be cowed by these organizations, or particularly by woke corporations, from doing the right thing,” DeSantis explained.

The Republican governor said protecting women’s athletics is worth the cost of losing NCAA events.

“We have to protect our girls. It is discriminatory to force them to compete against biological males,” DeSantis said. “If the price of having a tournament is that I have to deny equal opportunity to hundreds of thousands of young girl and women athletes throughout Florida, I am much more willing to stand with the girls. And to hell with these events.”

“If corporations want to come in and try to bully us around, they are going to go nowhere. It’s going to be like hitting their head against a brick wall,” he added.

What has the NCAA said?

The NCAA has not yet responded to Florida’s new law or DeSantis’ remarks.

However, as the New York Times noted, the NCAA’s statement in April failed to explicitly pledge to pull events from states that enact laws not favorable to LGBT activists, suggesting the NCAA’s woke appeasement is all bark and no bite.

In fact, the NCAA’s failure to act has enraged LGBT advocacy groups, like the Human Rights Campaign.

HRC president Alphonso David said recently:

The NCAA should be ashamed of themselves for violating their own policy by choosing to hold championships in states that are not healthy, safe, or free from discrimination for their athletes. It also undermines their commitment to transgender participation in NCAA events, for which they have had an inclusive policy for years. While we have remained hopeful about the NCAA stepping up to the plate and taking action like they have done in the past, they are willfully ignoring that commitment this time, despite repeated attempts by the Human Rights Campaign and others to communicate the harsh and harmful negative impacts of this legislation, which is not just pending but enacted into law in seven states, with South Dakota also creating two Executive Orders to similar discriminatory affect. Their words will not stop discrimination, only actions to deliver real consequences to states that dare to discriminate. The NCAA must face scrutiny and public pressure to do the right thing.

Indeed, the NCAA even recently selected the University of Florida, located in Gainesville, as host of a regional tournament for NCAA baseball.

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Intelwars NCAA Ncaa transgender Transgender athletes transgender ban Transgender sports

NCAA ‘unequivocally supports’ transgender athletes participating in women’s sports and will pull championships from states that disagree

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, the country’s largest organization regulating college athletics, announced this week that it “firmly and unequivocally supports” the inclusion of transgender athletes in college sports competitions.

What are the details?

The announcement comes as Republican-controlled legislatures in multiple states around the country consider legislation banning transgender individuals who are biologically male from competing in women’s sports. Proponents of the legislation argue that to allow such individuals to participate is “unfair” to female athletes.

However, in a statement issued Monday, the NCAA insisted its dedication to including transgender athletes in women’s sports is for the purpose of producing “fair competition.”

“The NCAA Board of Governors firmly and unequivocally supports the opportunity for transgender student-athletes to compete in college sports. This commitment is grounded in our values of inclusion and fair competition,” the statement said.

The organization cited a policy implemented in 2010, which “requires testosterone suppression treatment for transgender women to compete in women’s sports,” as a means to provide a “more inclusive path for transgender participation in college sports.”

“Inclusion and fairness can coexist for all student-athletes, including transgender athletes, at all levels of sport,” the board argued. “Our clear expectation as the Association’s top governing body is that all student-athletes will be treated with dignity and respect.”

What else?

The board also raised eyebrows in the statement by vowing to pull championship events out of states that disagree with its policies regarding transgender athletes’ participation, a move that was immediately celebrated by transgender advocates.

“When determining where championships are held, NCAA policy directs that only locations where hosts can commit to providing an environment that is safe, healthy and free of discrimination should be selected,” the statement said. “We will continue to closely monitor these situations to determine whether NCAA championships can be conducted in ways that are welcoming and respectful of all participants.”

The American Civil Liberties Union, a left-wing advocacy organization, commended the decision on Monday, firing a warning shot to state lawmakers.

“Today the NCAA confirmed it will pull events from states with bills banning trans students from participating in school sports,” the group said in a tweet, adding, “State lawmakers take note: discriminating against trans youth is wrong, against the law, and costly.”

“Dangerous proposals around the country are putting transgender young people at risk,” National Center for Transgender Equality deputy executive director Rodrigo Heng-Lehtinen added. “The NCAA is making it clear that their Board of Governors supports transgender athletes, and the board should hold those states passing these harmful laws accountable.”

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Intelwars NCAA Ncaa transgender Transgender athletes transgender ban Transgender sports

NCAA ‘unequivocally supports’ transgender athletes participating in women’s sports and will pull championships from states that disagree

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, the country’s largest organization regulating college athletics, announced this week that it “firmly and unequivocally supports” the inclusion of transgender athletes in college sports competitions.

What are the details?

The announcement comes as Republican-controlled legislatures in multiple states around the country consider legislation banning transgender individuals who are biologically male from competing in women’s sports. Proponents of the legislation argue that to allow such individuals to participate is “unfair” to female athletes.

However, in a statement issued Monday, the NCAA insisted its dedication to including transgender athletes in women’s sports is for the purpose of producing “fair competition.”

“The NCAA Board of Governors firmly and unequivocally supports the opportunity for transgender student-athletes to compete in college sports. This commitment is grounded in our values of inclusion and fair competition,” the statement said.

The organization cited a policy implemented in 2010, which “requires testosterone suppression treatment for transgender women to compete in women’s sports,” as a means to provide a “more inclusive path for transgender participation in college sports.”

“Inclusion and fairness can coexist for all student-athletes, including transgender athletes, at all levels of sport,” the board argued. “Our clear expectation as the Association’s top governing body is that all student-athletes will be treated with dignity and respect.”

What else?

The board also raised eyebrows in the statement by vowing to pull championship events out of states that disagree with its policies regarding transgender athletes’ participation, a move that was immediately celebrated by transgender advocates.

“When determining where championships are held, NCAA policy directs that only locations where hosts can commit to providing an environment that is safe, healthy and free of discrimination should be selected,” the statement said. “We will continue to closely monitor these situations to determine whether NCAA championships can be conducted in ways that are welcoming and respectful of all participants.”

The American Civil Liberties Union, a left-wing advocacy organization, commended the decision on Monday, firing a warning shot to state lawmakers.

“Today the NCAA confirmed it will pull events from states with bills banning trans students from participating in school sports,” the group said in a tweet, adding, “State lawmakers take note: discriminating against trans youth is wrong, against the law, and costly.”

“Dangerous proposals around the country are putting transgender young people at risk,” National Center for Transgender Equality deputy executive director Rodrigo Heng-Lehtinen added. “The NCAA is making it clear that their Board of Governors supports transgender athletes, and the board should hold those states passing these harmful laws accountable.”

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Intelwars Kristi noem NCAA south dakota South dakota transgender sports bill Transgender athletes Transgender sports

Report: South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem undecided on bill to protect women’s sports

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem (R) reportedly has not yet made up her mind on whether to sign a controversial bill that would ban transgender athletes from participating on sports teams according to how they identify.

The Daily Caller reported Friday that Noem is “wavering” on whether to sign the bill after facing pressure from the NCAA, the South Dakota Chamber of Commerce, and threats from Amazon to abandon a plant in Sioux Falls if she should sign it.

The legislation, H.B. 1217, would prohibit any student at a state school from joining a sports team that does not match their biological sex. On International Women’s Day on March 8, Noem publicly stated she was “excited” to sign the bill, which proponents say would protect women’s sports by ensuring men taking hormones to transition to female would not be allowed to compete against women.

However, in an interview with the Argus Leader published Thursday, Noem said she was still reviewing the bill and that she would make a final decision on whether to sign it “probably in the next two to three days.”

“It’s a complicated bill even in that there are parts of it that aren’t written so well,” she said, without specifying the provisions of the legislation to which she referred.

TheBlaze reached out to Gov. Noem’s office for clarification but did not receive comment.

The Daily Caller received confirmation from Noem’s communications director Ian Fury that the governor has not yet made up her mind on the bill.

“Governor Noem is still weighing 106 pieces of legislation that have action due next Friday, and that is one of them,” Fury said.

The legislation faces opposition from business leaders and collegiate sports officials, who say it could result in millions of dollars of economic losses for South Dakota.

Dave Zimbeck of the Sioux Falls Sports Authority told the Argus Leader earlier this month that the NCAA could cancel its March Madness tournaments in Sioux Falls because of the bill. The proposed law would likely be viewed as discriminatory by the NCAA, violating its policies concerning diversity.

“Ultimately, that’s deemed under the NCAA policies as discriminatory. And that would put us on the outside looking in, and ultimately we would lose out on a bid we were seeking, and we would also lose out on a tournament that’s already been awarded to us,” Zimbeck said. “This bill as it’s written casts a big shadow on our ability to host a tournament.”

In a statement to the Argus Leader, the NCAA reaffirmed its commitment to supporting transgender athletes and said it is closely monitoring policies that could impact their participation in collegiate sports.

“The NCAA believes in fair and respectful student-athlete participation at all levels of sport. The Association’s transgender student-athlete participation policy and other diversity policies are designed to facilitate and support inclusion. The NCAA believes diversity and inclusion improve the learning environment and it encourages its member colleges and universities to support the well-being of all student-athletes,” NCAA spokesperson Gail Dent said.

In previous years, NCAA sports tournaments hosted in South Dakota have generated millions of dollars in revenues for local businesses.

Zimbeck also noted that schools that follow the law but violate NCAA policy could lose their accreditation with the NCAA and their ability to compete against other schools outside South Dakota.

“It’s predictable – it’s very alarming, but it’s predictable – that the colleges under the Board of Regents’ control would be put in a position where they have to disconnect or walk away from the NCAA and lose their accreditation and ultimately have no place to compete,” Zimbeck said. “Without a conference affiliation, without an NCAA membership, the schools have no place to play, and now we could see where we essentially have to eliminate athletics completely from state-run colleges or universities, which is extremely alarming.”

The bill’s backers in the state legislature acknowledged to the Daily Caller that opposition was “inevitable” but said that sometimes doing the right thing means standing up to “bully tactics.”

“I think the reality of it is that if you stand up for the right thing, and this is the right thing, that good will come of it,” Republican bill sponsor state Rep. Rhonda Milstead said, “that bully tactics aren’t gonna work if you hold your ground. And that’s what those are, bully tactics.”

The South Dakota state constitution empowers the governor to send bills “with errors in style or form” back to the legislature with specific recommendations for change. Milstead speculated that Noem may attempt to use this power, but dismissed the strategy as inappropriate.

“She’s the executive branch, the legislature is the one that passes laws,” Milstead said. “So if she wants to change the language, it has nothing to do with style and form. It has everything to do with content, context.”

“That’s not appropriate,” she added. “It’s really going outside of the powers of the branch. That’s not what the executive branch is for.”

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Brian hainline College Football College sports Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars NCAA Ncaa chief medical officer

‘No way we can go forward with sports’ with current COVID-19 testing capability, top NCAA doctor says

Many of the top college football decision-makers are split about whether to have a season this fall, but the NCAA’s chief medical officer said there is “no way” any sports should be played in the fall with the current COVID-19 testing capability in the U.S.

What’s this about? The NCAA has canceled its fall championships. College football, however, operates separately from the NCAA’s authority, so several major conferences still intend to play football next month, even though other conferences have canceled the fall season.

NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline told CNN that the speed and availability of COVID-19 testing is not sufficient for a safe season.

“The pathway to play sports is so exceedingly narrow right now,” Hainline said during a late-night CNN interview. “Everything would have to line up perfectly. … Right now, if testing in the US stays the way it is, there’s no way we can go forward with sports.”

Testing issues: Hainline said that discussions from the spring about how sports could eventually return assumed that over the course of the next several months, there would be an effective national testing and contact tracing strategy that would allow schools to better manage the risks of COVID-19.

With the start of the fall football season just weeks away, the availability of testing varies from state to state, as does the speed with which people can get their results back. In higher-volume areas such as New York City, there have been reports of a two-week delay in getting results back — which makes the test almost worthless, considering many people will recover from the virus within that time frame.

The Food and Drug Administration has approved a rapid saliva test on an emergency basis, and the NBA has used the tests in its return. But those tests are not widely available enough for them to be a viable option for college sports any time soon.

Fighting for the season: The Big Ten and Pac-12, two of college football’s elite conferences that have canceled the fall season, are hoping to play in the spring, although it’s unclear how that will work if other conferences are playing in the fall.

Ohio State University quarterback Justin Fields initiated a petition on behalf of Big Ten players to bring the season back.

“We, the football players of the Big Ten, together with the fans and supporters of college football, request that the Big Ten Conference immediately reinstate the 2020 football season,” the petition reads. “Allow Big Ten players/teams to make their own choice as to whether they wish to play or opt out this fall season. Allow Big Ten players/teams who choose to opt out of playing a fall season to do so without penality [sic] or repercussion.”

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Big 10 College Football Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars NCAA Power 5

College football is in jeopardy with at least one major conference reportedly voting to cancel fall season

The Big Ten, one of college football’s elite “Power Five” conferences, has voted to cancel the fall football season because of COVID-19 health and safety concerns, according to the Detroit Free Press.

Presidents for the conference’s 14 universities reportedly voted 12-2 to cancel the fall season, with Iowa and Nebraska as the two schools that voted to play, according to sources who spoke to the Free Press anonymously because they weren’t authorized to talk about it publicly yet.

A heart condition linked to COVID-19 has been found in five Big Ten athletes, reportedly fueling concerns about whether the season should be played.

The Big Ten bailing on the fall season could be the first major domino to fall that leads other top schools or conferences to make the same decision, although there is not unanimity among the five conferences about how to go forward. Some want to go forward with the fall, others favor pushing the season to the spring in hopes that the pandemic will be more under control by then.

The Mid-American Conference, which is not in the Power Five, became the first school in the Football Bowl Subdivision to cancel its season.

The Chicago Tribune has reported that it was told by another Big Ten source that no final decision has been made regarding cancellation of the season.

Despite the vote from the presidents, players and coaches from around the country, including from Big Ten schools that voted to cancel, have publicly expressed their desire to play. Some have argued that players are actually safer within the confines of a controlled campus athletics environment than they would be at home.

“I want to play, but I want to play for the players’ sake, the value they can create for themselves,” Alabama head coach Nick Saban told ESPN. “I know I’ll be criticized no matter what I say, that I don’t care about player safety. Look, players are a lot safer with us than they are running around at home. We have around a 2% positive ratio on our team since the Fourth of July. It’s a lot higher than that in society. We act like these guys can’t get this unless they play football. They can get it anywhere, whether they’re in a bar or just hanging out.”

The potential for some Power Five conferences to cancel fall seasons has led to speculation that schools that want to play may attempt to switch conferences and join other schools that want to go forward with the season, although such movement could be prohibited under contractual agreements.

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College Football Gary patterson Intelwars n-word NCAA racial slur Tcu Texas christian university

College football coach apologizes for using N-word while telling a player to stop saying it

Texas Christian University head football coach Gary Patterson apologized for using a racial slur Sunday while telling a player to stop saying the word, ESPN reported.

TCU linebacker Dylan Jordan publicized Patterson’s use of the N-word in a Twitter post. Some players reportedly skipped Monday’s practice in response to the incident.

“I met with our seniors and leadership council last night about how we move forward as a team, together,” Patterson said in a statement posted on Twitter. “We are committed as individuals and as a program to fighting racial injustice of any kind.

“I apologize for the use of a word that, in any context, is unacceptable,” Patterson’s statement continued. “I have always encouraged our players to do better and be better and I must live by the same standards.”

According to Jordan, Patterson upset him by making fun of him in front of teammates during practice for posting a picture of his girlfriend online for National Girlfriend Day. When Jordan confronted Patterson about it later, Jordan said Patterson called him a “f***ing brat” and threatened to send him back to his hometown of Pittsburg, Kansas.

In Jordan’s recounting of the incident, he asked Patterson what he did wrong. That’s when Patterson reportedly accused Jordan of using the racial slur in the team meeting room, and Patterson used the word in the process.

Senior tight end Artayvious Lynn posted a statement online saying that while he has experienced racism at TCU, neither Patterson nor any other coach has ever called him the N-word.

“We were in the locker [room] with Coach [Patterson] discussing ways to move forward,” Lynn wrote. “I feel he understood that he couldn’t say the word regardless. We also asked coach to quit saying, ‘I don’t see color,’ because he has to see it. We living in hard times for black people right now. We must continue to demand change. … Trying to get over 400 years of trauma isn’t an easy task, we must all be open minded and mindful of each other period.”

There is no indication that Patterson will face any discipline for the incident. The university chancellor called it a “teachable moment.”

“He said it trying to ask the players not to use it anymore,” Chancellor Victor Boschini wrote, according to ESPN. “He has since apologized for doing so in this manner and said it was a teachable moment for him and many others.”

TCU is located in Fort Worth, Texas.

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College Football Intelwars Matt Boermeester NCAA NFL title ix university of southern california USC

Former USC football player wins in court years after wrongful domestic abuse expulsion ruined his career

A former University of Southern California football player had his expulsion reversed by a California appeals court, after he was kicked out of school in 2017 due to a Title IX domestic abuse allegation, Reason reported.

Matt Boermeester was a kicker for USC until 2017. In January of that year, two students saw Boermeester put his hands around his girlfriend’s neck and push her against a wall and reported the incident.

Boermeester said they were just “horsing around.” His girlfriend, Zoe Katz, told USC investigators that she has “never been abused, assaulted or otherwise mistreated by Matthew Boemeester; not on January 21, 2017, and not ever.”

The Los Angeles Times reported that Katz had initially confirmed the allegations before denying any abuse later on, but said her previous statements had been “misrepresented, misquoted, and taken out of context.” Investigators reportedly disregarded her denials and categorized her as a “battered woman” who was scared to speak against her abuser.

The California Court of Appeals ruled that USC’s discipline was unfair and “denied Boermeester a meaningful opportunity to cross-examine critical witnesses at an in-person hearing.” The case will be remanded to a superior court to “afford Boermeester the opportunity to directly or indirectly cross-examine witnesses at an in-person hearing.”

Boermeester said he was grateful for the win, but it doesn’t make up for what he lost when he was expelled just months after kicking the winning field goal for USC in the 2017 Rose Bowl.

“After having three years of my life derailed, I’m gratified that the California Court of Appeals finally reversed my expulsion based on USC’s wrongful, male-biased, witch hunt brought against me,” Boermeester said, according to Reason. “Make no mistake, USC stripped away my educational opportunities and hopes and dreams of playing in the NFL, and this ‘win’ does not erase that.”

Boermeester’s case has been cited by Education Secretary Betsy DeVos in her efforts to reform the process by which campus sexual assaults are adjudicated.

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College Football Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars NCAA

Some college football programs eye June practices while others question whether there will be a season at all

Why should states like Iowa or Michigan be subject to the same coronavirus restrictions as New York? That policy question has sparked political debate and protest, and is also a key question to determine what an upcoming college football season might look like, USA Today’s Dan Wolken writes.

Under normal circumstances, college football players would begin arriving back on campus in late May and early June for summer classes and workouts. But with many states banning nonessential gatherings of more than 10 people, there is disagreement among major college football programs about how to proceed.

Unlike major professional sports leagues, major college football is governed more by conferences than by a single governing body like the NCAA — and what’s viable for the mostly midwestern Big Ten right now might not work as well in the West Coast-based PAC-12.

Wolken reports that the Southeastern Conference wants to have a normal fall season, regardless of what other conferences can or cannot do. The PAC-12 would prefer the major conferences come to a uniform decision. The Big 12 anticipates a scenario in which the season starts on time but is potentially suspended in the late fall or early winter due to a second wave of the virus. At least one Big Ten school, the University of Iowa, is aiming for June 1 to start practicing.

The decision made by publicly funded universities could vary widely depending on which governor is in charge. Some governors are pushing reopening more aggressively, while others seem intent on keeping lockdowns in place until there is a coronavirus vaccine or until the virus disappears.

“I don’t think you’re going to like it and I don’t think people are going to be happy about it, but in reality, I don’t see how you’ll be able to hold up 10 or 12 schools in one conference (because of) two states that are opening up a month later,” Penn State head football coach James Franklin said in a conference call with reporters Wednesday. “And that’s the same thing by conference. I don’t think you can penalize one conference from opening because another conference is opening way ahead.”

There are serious concerns involved with bringing college football back too soon. A locker room environment that keeps 100 or more players and coaches in close proximity with one another would be a high risk environment for rapid spreading of the virus. Additionally, it’s unclear whether programs could have enough available tests to ensure that infected players aren’t participating and infecting others.

While the players themselves would largely be in a demographic in which there is a low risk of serious illness or death from the coronavirus, there are some coaches and staff members who might be at higher risk and therefore may have to find ways to keep social distance while performing their duties.

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College sports Conference tournament Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars March Madness MLB NBA NCAA NHL

Nearly all major sports in the US have shut down over fear of coronavirus spread

Coronavirus has spread in the United States to such an extent that the major sports leagues have decided it’s no longer worth the risk to fans, players, and staff to continue competition.

The leagues were already discussing barring fans from events in order to prevent large gatherings with high potential for spread of the virus, but a couple of positive coronavirus tests on an NBA team have spurred leagues to pause indefinitely before things get too bad.

National Basketball Association: The NBA has suspended its season until further notice. Two players on the Utah Jazz, Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell, tested positive for coronavirus this week.

National Collegiate Athletic Association: All five of the major NCAA conferences have canceled their tournaments: the SEC, Big 12, Big 10, ACC, and PAC-12. Other conferences that have canceled include the Ivy League, A-10, AAC, Conference USA, MAC, and WAC. The Big East has opted to continue its tournament.

The NCAA has not yet canceled the NCAA basketball tournament that is scheduled for later this month, although it has limited attendance to players, staff, and some family members.

Powerhouse programs Duke and Kansas announced Thursday afternoon that they are shutting down all athletic travel indefinitely.

National Hockey League: The NHL announced Thursday that it is “pausing” its season indefinitely.

Major League Baseball: The MLB, currently in spring training, is expected to suspend all baseball operations indefinitely sometime Thursday, ESPN’s Jeff Passan reported.

Major League Soccer: The MLS has suspended its season for at least 30 days.

President Donald Trump announced severe restrictions on people traveling from the European Union, a measure that will take effect Friday and go for at least 30 days. There are more than 1,200 confirmed cases of coronavirus in the U.S., although that number is almost certainly below the actual number due to a continued lack of access to accurate coronavirus tests.

The World Health Organization declared coronavirus a pandemic Wednesday.

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