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Gatherings Gov. mike parson Government Holiday Homes Intelwars Missouri

Gov. Mike Parson to Missourians: ‘Government has no business’ regulating gatherings in homes

Like other leaders across the U.S., Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) reminded his constituents ahead of the Thanksgiving Day to be cautious about COVID-19. But instead of handing down government dictates ahead of the festivities, Parson did just the opposite: he reminded Missourians of their rights, and vowed not to step on them.

What are the details?

“The holidays are coming, and as the Governor of the State of Missouri, I am not going to mandate who goes in the front door of your home,” the former law enforcement officer tweeted. “Government has no business going through the front door of your homes to decide how many members of your family are there, how many are not.”

Parson told the citizens of the Show-Me state, “Ultimately, we each must take responsibility for our actions,” and issued the longstanding recommendation that folks practice social distancing, wear masks, and wash their hands to stave off the virus. He also suggested that people “host outdoor activities rather than indoor activities as much as possible” and pointed to further guidance from the state’s health department.

The Republican’s promise not to “mandate who goes in the front door” of citizens’ homes is in stark contrast to the messages being sent from jurisdictions across the U.S., where leaders have issued decrees on how many people may gather in private residences, and even how many separate households guests can hail from.

Parson’s view on such laws might have to do with his former career as a sheriff, which falls in line with law enforcement officers nationwide who have publicly refused to enforce measures regulating people’s party plans.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D), for instance, issued an executive order earlier this month limiting New York residents to only 10 people gathering together in a home. Within days, several upstate sheriffs stated outright that they would not enforce such a mandate, calling it unconstitutional.

Fulton County Sheriff Richard Giardino told CNN of Cuomo, “I don’t think the Constitution allows for the infringement on the number of people in your own home. He has authority to do a lot but not to tell law enforcement to get into someone’s house and count who is there.”

California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) also issued new executive orders ahead of the holidays. As columnist John Phillips described them in the Los Angeles Daily News: “The Warden’s latest Thanksgiving Day guidelines decreed that parties be held outdoors, with guests from no more than three households, seated six feet apart, taking off their masks only to eat and drink, and no one is allowed indoors except to use the bathroom.”

Newsom, of course, was busted breaking his own coronavirus restrictions by attending a lavish birthday dinner for a lobbyist with at least a dozen people inside one of the swankiest restaurants in the country.

California sheriffs pushed back against Newsom’s orders, too. The Sacramento County Sheriff’s Office issued a statement this week declaring outright that they “will not be determining—including entering any home or business—compliance with, or enforcing compliance of, any health or emergency orders related to curfews, staying at home, Thanksgiving or other social gatherings inside or outside the home, maximum occupancy, or mask mandates.”

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Boo Chiefs Fans Intelwars Josh hawley Missouri political Racial equality

Chiefs game becomes political football after boos during moment of silence for racial equality

Thursday night’s NFL game between the Kansas City Chiefs on their home turf against the Houston Texans became political football in the media — social and otherwise — after some fans booed during a moment of silence against racial injustices when both teams lined up and locked arms in solidarity for a pregame ceremony.

What are the details?

Ahead of the game at Arrowhead Stadium, all but one of the Chiefs stood for “The Star-Spangled Banner,” while the entire Texans team and coaching staff opted to stay in their locker room while the national anthem played.

After that, the Texans went onto the field and both teams lined up, locking arms in solidarity in what
NBC Sports reported as “a moment of silence recognizing the fight for racial equality in America prior to playing the first game of the 2020 NFL season.”

Then, the Texans returned to their locker room while Alicia Keys sang “Lift Ev’ry Voice and Sing,” also known as the black national anthem.

Texans executive vice president of football operations Jack Easterby explained to ESPN that his team’s pregame actions were devised with the intention that there would be “no misinterpretation of them celebrating one song and throwing shade on the other.”

After the actual game began, media outlet
Raw Story reported that the state of Missouri was “blasted as ‘classless trash’ after NFL Chiefs fans started booing during moment of silence for racial equality.” It’s worth noting that the person on social media who used the “classless trash” label was referring to Chiefs fans, and not the state.

Regardless, some fans did boo. Others cheered. The Daily Caller posted video with audio from the moment:

In reaction to Raw Story posting their piece on Twitter, Missouri Republican Sen. Josh Hawley replied, “‘Classless trash’? The left showing their usual contempt for middle America. Missouri has the best fans in the country. Don’t blame them for being tired of NFL/corporate woke politics jammed down their throats.”

The NFL
has not been bashful about its initiative to promote social justice causes after players pressed the league to endorse racial equality initiatives in the wake of the death of George Floyd in late May. But the league has received backlash from some fans, pundits, and politicians over their overt embrace of Black Lives Matter, whose leaders have declared themselves trained Marxists.

One of the most prominent advocates of the NFL declaring support for BLM this year is Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who recently signed a 10-year deal with the franchise for the heftiest amount in history.

The New York Post reported that in July, Mahomes — who was the 2018 Super Bowl MVP — agreed to a contract extension worth more than a half billion dollars that runs through 2031.

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Armed couple st louis Couple with guns Intelwars Mike parson Missouri St louis couple St louis couple defend home St louis couple guns

Missouri governor says he’ll likely pardon armed St. Louis couple if they are charged

The governor of Missouri does not expect the armed St. Louis couple who defended their home to go to jail, and he would be willing to pardon them if it came down to it.

Mark and Patricia McCloskey garnered internet fame, condemnation, and praise after photos and videos of them defending their home went viral. Approximately 500 protesters marched into a gated community in the wealthy Central West End neighborhood on June 28. The two St. Louis attorneys were prepared to protect their mansion and were caught on camera wielding guns.

St. Louis police served a search warrant on lawyers the McCloskeys earlier this month. Police confiscated the couple’s firearms that they were armed with during the tense encounter with demonstrators in June – an AR-15 rifle and a handgun.

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, the prosecutor who is handling the case, said, “We must protect the right to peacefully protest, and any attempt to chill it through intimidation or threat of deadly force will not be tolerated.”

While there have yet to be charges filed against the couple, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) said he would pardon the McCloskeys if they are charged for brandishing firearms at a group of protesters outside their home.

Parson made the revelation on Friday during an appearance on “The Marc Cox Morning Show” on 97.1 FM in St. Louis. Parson said the McCloskeys “did what they legally should do” in protecting their property.

“A mob does not have the right to charge your property,” Parson stated. “They had every right to protect themselves.”

When asked if he would pardon the St. Louis couple if charges were filled, Parsons replied, “I think that’s exactly what would happen,” according to The Hill.

“Right now, that’s what I feel,” he added. “You don’t know until you hear all the facts. But right now, if this is all about going after them for doing a lawful act, then yeah, if that scenario ever happened, I don’t think they’re going to spend any time in jail.”

Parson wrote on Twitter: “We will not allow law-abiding citizens to be targeted for exercising their constitutional rights.”

Parson, along with President Donald Trump and Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), have all criticized Gardner’s investigation into the couple. President Trump called the investigation of the McCloskeys a “disgrace.”

Hawley called for an investigation into the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office.

“This is an unacceptable abuse of power and threat to the Second Amendment,” read a letter from Hawley to U.S. Attorney General William Barr. “I urge you to consider a federal civil rights investigation into the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office to determine whether this investigation and impending prosecution violates this family’s constitutional right.”

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt said the McCloskeys have been politically targeted.

“Under Missouri law, under the Castle Doctrine, an individual has really expansive authority to protect their own lives, their home, and their property. I think the story here to watch here is the local prosecutor, Kim Gardner,” Schmitt said in a Fox News interview.

“Kim Gardner has an abysmal record in prosecuting violent crime, has recently released and been complicit in the release of dozens and dozens of inmates who have been charged with violent crimes, and has a record of making politically motivated decisions not based on the law,” Schmitt added. “So, this is certainly something to watch.”

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Castle Doctrine Donald Trump Intelwars Kimberly gardner Mark mccloskey Mccloskeys Mike parson Missouri St. Louis

President Trump will be ‘getting involved’ in McCloskey case as criminal charges loom

Just one day after Mark McCloskey, the St. Louis attorney who went viral for defending his property from an encroaching mob, predicted that he and his wife would be “indicted shortly,” President Donald Trump is reportedly looking into the case.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) revealed Tuesday that Trump would be “getting involved,” the Washington Post reported.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican. (Jacob Moscovitch/Getty Images)

Parson — who finally offered his own defense of the couple, saying they had “every right to protect their property” — reportedly discussed the matter with Trump during a phone call Tuesday afternoon.

“The president said that he would do everything he could within his powers to help with this situation and he would be taking action to do that,” Parson said.

In an interview with Townhall Media, Trump criticized local St. Louis authorities as a “disgrace” for seeking to punish the McCloskeys. He said:

When you look at St. Louis, where two people, they came out. They were going to be beat up badly if they were lucky. If they were lucky. They were going be beat up badly and the house was going to be totally ransacked and probably burned down like they tried to burn down churches. And these people were standing there, never used it and they were legal, the weapons, and now I understand somebody local, they want to prosecute these people. It’s a disgrace.

After the McCloskeys went viral last month, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner claimed the couple had committed a “violent assault,” and she vowed to hold them accountable. Her statement came before an investigation into the matter had been completed, let alone initiated.

On Tuesday, she blasted Trump and Parson for what she claimed was jurisdictional overstep.

“It is unbelievable the Governor of the state of Missouri would seek advice from one of the most divisive leaders in our generation to overpower the discretion of a locally elected prosecutor,” she said in a statement.

St. Louis authorities executed a warrant against the McCloskeys last Friday during which the couple’s firearms were seized. The basis of the warrant was not made clear.

What is clear, law experts say, was the McCloskeys’ right to defend their property — even if it meant using lethal force.

Anders Walker, a constitutional law professor at the St. Louis University School of Law, told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch that Missouri’s castle doctrine protects the McCloskeys from criminal liability.

“At any point that you enter the property, they can then, in Missouri, use deadly force to get you off the lawn,” Walker explained. “There’s no right to protest on those streets. The protesters thought they had a right to protest, but as a technical matter, they were not allowed to be there. … It’s essentially a private estate. If anyone was violating the law, it was the protesters.”

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Fox News Intelwars Kimberly gardner Mark mccloskey Missouri Second Amendment St. Louis Tucker Carlson

St. Louis attorney who defended property from encroaching mob says he will be ‘indicted shortly’

Mark McCloskey, the St. Louis attorney who went viral last month for defending his property from an encroaching mob, revealed Monday that he and his wife, Patricia, may be “indicted shortly.”

“My attorney advised me not to be on the show tonight because the rumor is that we are going to be indicted shortly,” McCloskey told Fox News host Tucker Carlson.

Mark McCloskey with Fox News host Tucker Carlson. (Image source: YouTube screenshot)

As TheBlaze reported, local authorities executed a warrant against the McCloskeys last Friday during which police seized the firearms the couple was seen holding in viral photos and videos.

According to McCloskey, the police who served the warrant were “almost apologetic,” but had no control over the case, which is being directed by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, a Democrat.

“[The police], unfortunately, are stuck between a circuit attorney [Kim Gardner] that wants to prosecute us, and their own belief that we did absolutely nothing wrong,” McCloskey explained.

He added, “This is the same circuit attorney that released 35 of the protesters that torched and looted downtown St. Louis, but now she wants to indict me. I didn’t shoot anybody. I just held my ground, protected my house, and I’m sitting here on television tonight instead of dead or putting out the smoldering embers of my home.”

Later, McCloskey said the “only possible solution” to the outrage mob, in the midst of a cultural moment denouncing police, is “for individual citizens to stand up and defend themselves.”

Despite the warrant and having their firearms seized, no criminal charges have yet been filed against the McCloskeys.

After the McCloskeys went viral, Gardner vowed to hold the couple “accountable,” claiming they had committed a “violent assault.” However, Missouri’s castle doctrine makes it clear that residents are lawfully permitted to use lethal force to protect their property.


St. Louis couple who defended their home had rifle seized, may face indictment

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Castle Doctrine Eric Schmitt Intelwars Kim gardner Mark mccloskey Missouri Second Amendment St. Louis

Missouri AG calls out St. Louis prosecutor, reveals history of politically motivated decisions

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt suggested Friday that St. Louis attorneys Mark and Patricia McCloskey, the couple who went viral for defending their property from an encroaching mob, are being politically targeted.

On Friday, law enforcement executed a warrant against the McCloskeys and confiscated their firearms.

Image via Twitter @xshularx screenshot

Speaking on Fox News, Schmitt alleged that St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner, the prosecutor handling the case, has a history of making politically motivated decisions.

“Under Missouri law, under the Castle Doctrine, an individual has really expansive authority to protect their own lives, their home, and their property. I think the story here to watch here is the local prosecutor, Kim Gardner,” Schmitt said.

“Kim Gardner has an abysmal record in prosecuting violent crime, has recently released and been complicit in the release of dozens and dozens of inmates who have been charged with violent crimes, and has a record of making politically motivated decisions not based on the law,” he explained. “So, this is certainly something to watch.”

After the incident with the McCloskeys generated national attention, Gardner released a statement claiming the McCloskeys had committed a “violent assault,” and she vowed to hold them accountable.

However, according to Schmitt, the McCloskeys did not act unlawfully.

One important factor here is this was a private street. This was not a public street. These individuals were on their way to the mayor’s house, actually, which has been vandalized several times. This was on a private street, and if you listen to the McCloskeys, they felt threatened, that they were going to be attacked, and that it was made known to them. They made known to the protesters and the people who came by that this was a private street, and they said they were going to murder them and come into their house, and so, as I said, the Castle Doctrine in Missouri is pretty expansive; it allows you to defend your life, obviously your family’s life, your home, but also your property, and this was on private property.

“It’s hard to get into the mind of Kim Gardner. As I said, she has a sketchy track record of making politically-based decisions,” Schmitt went on to say.

Despite the warrant, criminal charges have not been filed against the McCloskeys, nor was the basis of the warrant made clear.

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Castle Doctrine Intelwars Kimberly gardner Mark mccloskey Missouri Patricia mccloskey Second Amendment St. Louis

Warrant served on St. Louis couple who protected property from mob, police confiscate firearms

St. Louis police served a warrant on lawyers Mark and Patricia McCloskey late Friday, the couple who went viral last month for defending their property from an encroaching mob of protesters.

Police confiscated both firearms — an AR-15 rifle and a handgun — that the McCloskeys were seen holding in photos and videos, according to KSDK-TV.

However, no charges have been filed against the couple. Law enforcement sources told KSDK the warrant was issued to seize the firearms only.

Image via Twitter @xshularx screenshot

The basis for the warrant and firearm seizure is not clear.

Missouri’s castle doctrine permits residents to protect property with lethal force, according to Anders Walker, a constitutional law professor at St. Louis University School of Law.

“At any point that you enter the property, they can then, in Missouri, use deadly force to get you off the lawn,” Walker told the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “There’s no right to protest on those streets. The protesters thought they had a right to protest, but as a technical matter, they were not allowed to be there. … It’s essentially a private estate. If anyone was violating the law, it was the protesters.”

In fact, police later confirmed an investigation into the protesters — not the McCloskeys — for fourth-degree assault by intimidation, as well as trespassing.

Still, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner, a Democrat, has claimed the McCloskeys committed a “violent assault,” and she vowed to “use the full power of Missouri law to hold [the McCloskeys] accountable.”

The attorney representing the McCloskeys, Joel Schwartz, told KSDK that he is seeking to meet with Gardner as soon as possible about the warrant.

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China Coronavirus Intelwars Missouri pandemic Sues

Missouri sues China for damages over coronavirus pandemic

The state of Missouri has become the first in the U.S. to file a lawsuit against the Chinese government, seeking damages for the loss of lives and economic destruction resulting from the coronavirus pandemic that originated in Wuhan, China.

What are the details?

Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R) sued the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party of China, and several other Chinese authoritative bodies on Tuesday, accusing the defendants of deceptive practices and downplaying the severity of the outbreak to the rest of the world.

“An appalling campaign of deceit, concealment, misfeasance, and inaction by Chinese authorities unleashed this pandemic,” the suit reads. “During the critical weeks of the initial outbreak, Chinese authorities deceived the public, suppressed crucial information, arrested whistleblowers, denied human-to-human transmission in the face of mounting evidence, destroyed critical medical research, permitted millions of people to be exposed to the virus, and even hoarded personal protective equipment—thus causing a global pandemic that was unnecessary and preventable.”

Schmitt is seeking restitution, and asked the court to “order that the Chinese Government Defendants, the Communist Party, and the Laboratory Defendants cease engaging in the abnormally dangerous activities, reimburse the cost of [Missouri’s] abatement efforts, and pay compensatory and other damages caused” by the outbreak.

Fox News reported that “Missouri has confirmed 5,963 cases of the virus and 215 deaths as of Tuesday morning,” and noted that “the economic shutdown the state imposed to reduce the spread of the disease has cost Missouri about $44 billion, according to one estimate.”

“In Missouri, the impact of the virus is very real,” Schmitt said in a statement. “Thousands have been infected and many have died, families have been separated from dying loved ones, small businesses are shuttering their doors, and those living paycheck to paycheck are struggling to put food on their table.”

Anything else?

ABC News reported that “it’s unclear whether the lawsuit will have much, if any, impact,” pointing out that “U.S. law generally prohibits lawsuits against other countries with few exceptions.”

Chimene Keitner, an international law professor at the University of California, Hastings College of Law in San Francisco, explained to Reuters, “If the United States wants to bring claims against China, it will have to do so in an international forum. There is no civil jurisdiction over such claims in U.S. courts.”

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2nd Amend. gun rights guns home invasion Intelwars Missouri Self-Defense

Homeowner grabs gun after confronting intruder who broke into his residence. Then crook charges at him — and it’s a painful mistake.

A Missouri homeowner saw a man standing inside his St. Charles County residence by the back sliding door after breaking in Thursday morning, KMOV-TV reported.

Naturally the homeowner screamed at the man, asking who he is and why he was inside his home, police told the station.

With that, the homeowner grabbed his gun from his couch — and then the intruder charged at him, police added to KMOV, citing a probable cause statement.

The pair struggled for the gun, the station said — but the homeowner apparently got the upper hand, shooting the intruder once in the leg.

What happened next?

The intruder ran from the home, KMOV said, but didn’t get very far.

Police later located him on the side of a nearby home, after which he was transported to a hospital with injuries that were not life-threatening, the station said.

James Conley is charged with first-degree burglary and third-degree assault, KMOV reported, citing charging documents.

Image source: St. Charles County (Missouri) Police Department

Conley was still in custody of the St. Charles County Police Department, the station added.

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capitol Coronavirus COVID-19 Intelwars Lawmaker Missouri Representatives

Missouri shuts down capitol building after lawmaker tests positive for coronavirus

Missouri has locked down its capitol building after officials learned a member of the state’s House of Representatives tested positive for COVID-19, signalling to states across the nation that more legislatures could face a shut-down.

What are the details?

Speaker of the House Elijah Haahr (R) tweeted out a bipartisan press release from leaders in the state’s lower chamber on Friday evening, announcing:

We have learned a member of the House of Representatives has tested positive for the coronavirus. We are still working to notify members and staff that might have been in contact with the member and have requested all employees stay out of the Capitol for at least the next 10 days.

While we learn more and work closely with (the Department of Health and Human Services) to take every precaution necessary, we keep this member and their family in our thoughts and prayers in their battle to return back to health.

The lawmaker who tested positive was later identified as Rep. Joe Runions (D), 79, who had fallen ill and had been hospitalized since Saturday, The Kansas City Star reported. According to Democratic leadership, Rep. Runions had not been in the capitol building since March 12.

Nonetheless, other capitol employees and constituents may have come in contact with Mr. Runions and could be infected, leading House leadership to shut down the building for a thorough scrubbing.

Speaker Haahr says they were ready for this to happen.

“I created the House Committee on Disease Prevention on Feb. 27 before the first case of COVID-19 was diagnosed in Missouri,” Haahr told TheBlaze. “After testimony from experts on infectious disease, we anticipated this situation would occur.”

He added, “The Capitol is currently undergoing a deep clean and sanitization. As the situation evolves, we are reviewing options for re-opening and measures to protect the health of our members and staff.”

Anything else?

A number of states — including Missouri — have already closed their capitol buildings to visitors, but several remain open to lawmakers conducting state business.

Yet, Missouri is not the first state to close its capitol building due to a legislator contracting COVID-19. On Thursday, Hawaii shuttered its capitol building after a state senator tested positive.

Meanwhile, New York’s state capitol remains open to lawmakers, despite three assembly members testing positive for the virus.

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ban Ben baker bill Death Threats Drag Queen story hour Intelwars Missouri public libraries state senator

GOP lawmaker trying to ban Drag Queen Story Hours in public libraries says death threats have been directed at him, family

Missouri state Rep. Ben Baker, a Republican, told the Daily Caller that he and his family have received death threats after introducing a bill that would ban Drag Queen Story Hours in public libraries.

Baker added to the outlet he’s received “thousands of emails” over his bill and that “the pushback from media and from even the American Library Association … was astounding.”

“I’ve taken on some controversial issues in my time in public office, but this one has by far been the worst when it comes to the vitriol and the hate that we have received for doing this,” he noted to the Daily Caller.

Examples?

Baker provided the outlet with several photos of hateful messages sent to him on social media — and in one of them a Facebook user commented on a Baker family photo, saying the individuals in it are a “bunch of repulsive swines.”

“F***ing diseased pig, and his disgusting inbred little piglets,” the user also wrote — with the F-word spelled out — the Daily Caller said. “Hope you all die a slow and painful death.”

He also got a card signed “all librarians in St. Louis City and County” which read, “Please just STOP it with your imbecile proclivities.”

The Daily Caller said the St. Louis County Public Library didn’t respond to its request for comment.

What does else does Baker’s bill say?

Baker’s bill proposes instituting parental review boards to oversee event approval and potentially penalizing librarians with fines and even jail time if they violate the guidelines, the Washington Examiner said. The bill would also strip government funding from libraries that allow minors to view “age-inappropriate sexual materials,” the paper added.

“They’ve had these drag queen story hours, and that’s something that I take objection to and I think a lot of parents do,” Baker said when the bill was introduced, the Examiner said. “That’s where in a public space, our kids could be exposed to something that’s age-inappropriate. That’s what I’m trying to tackle.”

More pushback

In addition to the hate mail and death threats, Baker has been getting opposition from the American Library Association, LGBTQ proponents, and even Drag Queen Story Hour itself, the Daily Caller said, adding that more than 100 people gathered Saturday at the Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City for a protest rally organized by drag queens.

“We are deeply concerned by Missouri House Bill 2044, ‘Parental Oversight of Public Libraries Act,'” Every Library wrote in a statement after Baker introduced the bill, the outlet noted. “It sets up quasi-governmental tribunals that circumvent the normal way libraries review materials challenges and imposes fines or jail time on librarians who violate the act. It’s a bad bill and needs to be stopped.”

But Baker is resolute, telling the Daily Caller that he’s “a big advocate for children. I have four daughters. I’m a conservative. I’ve taught at a Bible school for eight years … I have a very conservative background and even a background in ministry.”

He added to the outlet that Drag Queen Story Hours shouldn’t be a concern limited to religious people.

“It’s an issue of protecting our kids from what I believe is a concentrated effort to push the LGBTQ agenda onto our children,” Baker told the Daily Caller. “Even worse than that, subjecting them to unwanted advances by people that I believe have nefarious intentions for children. And that’s my concern.”

The outlet said Drag Queen Story Hour and the American Library Association didn’t respond to its requests for comment.

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ban Ben baker bill Death Threats Drag Queen story hour Intelwars Missouri public libraries state senator

GOP lawmaker trying to ban Drag Queen Story Hours in public libraries says death threats have been directed at him, family

Missouri state Rep. Ben Baker, a Republican, told the Daily Caller that he and his family have received death threats after introducing a bill that would ban Drag Queen Story Hours in public libraries.

Baker added to the outlet he’s received “thousands of emails” over his bill and that “the pushback from media and from even the American Library Association … was astounding.”

“I’ve taken on some controversial issues in my time in public office, but this one has by far been the worst when it comes to the vitriol and the hate that we have received for doing this,” he noted to the Daily Caller.

Examples?

Baker provided the outlet with several photos of hateful messages sent to him on social media — and in one of them a Facebook user commented on a Baker family photo, saying the individuals in it are a “bunch of repulsive swines.”

“F***ing diseased pig, and his disgusting inbred little piglets,” the user also wrote — with the F-word spelled out — the Daily Caller said. “Hope you all die a slow and painful death.”

He also got a card signed “all librarians in St. Louis City and County” which read, “Please just STOP it with your imbecile proclivities.”

The Daily Caller said the St. Louis County Public Library didn’t respond to its request for comment.

What does else does Baker’s bill say?

Baker’s bill proposes instituting parental review boards to oversee event approval and potentially penalizing librarians with fines and even jail time if they violate the guidelines, the Washington Examiner said. The bill would also strip government funding from libraries that allow minors to view “age-inappropriate sexual materials,” the paper added.

“They’ve had these drag queen story hours, and that’s something that I take objection to and I think a lot of parents do,” Baker said when the bill was introduced, the Examiner said. “That’s where in a public space, our kids could be exposed to something that’s age-inappropriate. That’s what I’m trying to tackle.”

More pushback

In addition to the hate mail and death threats, Baker has been getting opposition from the American Library Association, LGBTQ proponents, and even Drag Queen Story Hour itself, the Daily Caller said, adding that more than 100 people gathered Saturday at the Missouri Capitol in Jefferson City for a protest rally organized by drag queens.

“We are deeply concerned by Missouri House Bill 2044, ‘Parental Oversight of Public Libraries Act,'” Every Library wrote in a statement after Baker introduced the bill, the outlet noted. “It sets up quasi-governmental tribunals that circumvent the normal way libraries review materials challenges and imposes fines or jail time on librarians who violate the act. It’s a bad bill and needs to be stopped.”

But Baker is resolute, telling the Daily Caller that he’s “a big advocate for children. I have four daughters. I’m a conservative. I’ve taught at a Bible school for eight years … I have a very conservative background and even a background in ministry.”

He added to the outlet that Drag Queen Story Hours shouldn’t be a concern limited to religious people.

“It’s an issue of protecting our kids from what I believe is a concentrated effort to push the LGBTQ agenda onto our children,” Baker told the Daily Caller. “Even worse than that, subjecting them to unwanted advances by people that I believe have nefarious intentions for children. And that’s my concern.”

The outlet said Drag Queen Story Hour and the American Library Association didn’t respond to its requests for comment.

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Attorney gardner CORRUPTION Eric greitens George Soros Greitens Indictment Intelwars Investigation Katrina sneed Kim gardner Kimberly gardner Missouri Missouri governor Prosecutor Soros St. Louis Tables turn

Tables turn on the Soros-backed Democratic prosecutor who forced Missouri’s GOP governor to resign

St. Louis circuit attorney Kimberly Gardner is facing heat following a seven-count felony indictment against her chief investigator for his actions in a failed prosecution against former Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens.

Gardner, who was funded heavily by liberal megadonor George Soros during her election, made waves in 2018 when her office led the arrest of then-Gov. Greitens on felony invasion of privacy charges.

Greitens was accused of tying up his mistress, blindfolding her, taking a picture without her permission, and then threatening to release the picture if she ever went public about the affair. Later in the investigation, Gardner’s office charged Greitens with computer tampering as it related to his campaign’s alleged procurement of donor lists.

The governor later resigned after mounting pressure from his colleagues.

But now, many months later, the picture has never been found and both sets of charges have been dropped — and the investigation is coming back on Gardner.

According to a Just the News report, investigators now allege that the Greitens prosecution, which led to the governor’s resignation, was built on false testimony and evidence tampering.

Most significantly, testimony transcripts and court records obtained by Just the News show the woman Gardner built her case around, beautician Katrina Sneed, testified she was asked unsolicited by Gardner’s office to come forward as a witness and that she was actually reluctant to accuse Greitens because the entire story of a photo on his mobile phone may have been a dream.

“And at any point where you were in the basement with E.G. (Eric Greitens) at his home, did you see what you believed to be a phone?” Sneed was asked during an April 6, 2018 pretrial deposition with defense lawyers.

Sneed answered: “So not that’s like a very vivid memory which is the reason why I haven’t talked about it because I don’t know if it’s because I’m remembering it through a dream or I — I’m not sure, but yes, I feel like I saw it after that happened, but I haven’t spoken about it because of that.”

Ahead of the 2018 prosecution, Gardner had hired an out-of-state investigator, William Tisaby, to build the case against Greitens. Tisaby reportedly met with Gardner in early January to gather gather background material ahead of a meeting with the governor’s paramour, Katrina Sneed. Sneed had not contacted authorities with a complaint prior to the meeting.

Gardner would eventually make the allegation that Greitens took a compromising picture of Sneed to use as blackmail, but no photo was ever found.

Last summer, Tisaby was indicted for six counts of felony perjury and one count of evidence tampering stemming from the Greitens prosecution. According to Just the News, Gardner has been ordered to appear before the grand jury in Tisaby’s criminal trial. She can be seen listed as a key witness for the upcoming trial in a copy of the indictment obtained by the news outlet.

The report goes on to indicate that the indictment against Tisaby may implicate his former boss, as well.

Facts disclosed in the Tisaby indictment suggest Gardner herself was complicit in his wrongdoing by staying silent while Tisaby allegedly lied. For instance, the special prosecutors alleged that when Tisaby falsely denied during a March 2018 pretrial deposition in the Greitens case that there was a functioning videotape of the Sneed interview, Gardner did not correct him even as she questioned him.

“There is no recording of this interview?,” Tisaby was asked by Gardner. “None whatsoever,” he answered.

Tisaby’s indictment declared that Gardner’s office had videotaped the sessions and she “failed to disclose the fact for several months.”

Prosecutors say a functioning videotape was found in Gardner’s office, and the camera had not malfunctioned as had been claimed, according to the Tisaby indictment.

Tisaby’s criminal trial is set to begin later this month.

In advance of the trial, for which she is set to appear, Gardner sued the city of St. Louis under a law passed in the 1800s to help fight the Ku Klux Klan, arguing there are “white supremacists” in the police force.

In the lawsuit, she accused city officials, police, and a special prosecutor of a “racially motivated conspiracy to deny the civil rights of racial minorities” interfering with her efforts to crack down on corruption within law enforcement.

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