Categories
child trafficking human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Missing kids North Carolina Sex trafficking US Marshals

More than 150 missing children found in North Carolina operation, some victims of human trafficking

More than 150 missing children were rescued in North Carolina, and some were victims of human trafficking. Over 130 missing and runaway juveniles were recovered with the assistance of the United States marshals in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg area after a monthslong investigation.

Another 27 “critically missing juveniles” were located during “Operation Carolina Homecoming,” a joint effort between Charlotte-Mecklenburg police and federal agents. Between April 26 and May 7, collaborative teams of detectives from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department’s Missing Person Unit, U.S. Marshal Service deputies, and the Department of Public Safety Missing Persons Unit conducted extensive searches to recover “especially difficult to find juveniles.” Previous efforts to locate the missing children had been unsuccessful, the city of Charlotte acknowledged in a news release.

Several of the minors had been engaged in high-risk activities such as prostitution and involvement in illegal drugs. CMPD said the minors were mostly between the ages of 14 to 18.

Some of the missing children were victims of human trafficking. CMPD officials are investigating the cases of child trafficking, and will arrest anyone who committed crimes involving the endangered children.

“Kids don’t need to be living alone in hotels, kids don’t need to be living alone with an older partner,” CMPD Captain Joel McNelly said, according to WCNC-TV. “People who do this are looking for people vulnerable people who have bad home lives and are looking for something else — people easily manipulated.”

McNelly said there were some minors who were “actively taking measures to avoid being recovered,” adding, “They’re self-sustaining, they’re trying to make money, support themselves.”

“These kids come from traumatic backgrounds, potentially abusive households, drug and alcohol addiction, incarcerated parents,” said McNelly, who is part of the CMPD’s Violent Crimes Division. “We’re proud of what we were able to do for the community through this.”

The recovered minors were provided with resources from Atrium Health Levine Children’s Hospital, Pat’s Place Child Advocacy Center, the North Carolina ISAAC Fusion Center, and Mecklenburg County Child Protective Services.

“Even if a kid goes out there with good intentions that they’re going to stay on the straight and narrow, it doesn’t take very long to get cold and hungry and succumb to the pressure of somebody who knows just how to time their effort into manipulate you into activity you maybe otherwise wouldn’t have wanted to be apart of,” said Dr. Stacy Reynolds with Atrium Health Levine Children’s Hospital.

In March, there were 150 missing and endangered children recovered in Tennessee during “Operation Volunteer Strong,” a joint mission by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Department of Children’s Service, and the U.S. Marshals Service.

In February, “Operation Broken Hearts” resulted in 37 people being arrested in the Phoenix area for alleged child sex crimes and human trafficking.

In January, “Operation Reclaim & Rebuild” ended in the apprehension of 64 suspects for alleged sex crimes in Riverside, California.

Also in January, which is National Human Trafficking Awareness Month, a multi-agency human trafficking investigation led by the FBI known as “Operation Lost Angels” resulted in the rescue of 33 missing children in California.


CMPD Weekly Briefing – May 19, 2021

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
Dallas Endangered children human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children sex crimes Sex trafficking Texas US Marshals

31 missing children recovered in Dallas-Fort Worth area during human trafficking operation

The U.S. Marshals Service and Homeland Security Investigations teamed up with four police departments in Texas for “Operation Missing in the Metroplex” to crack down on human trafficking. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Texas announced on Wednesday that 31 missing children from the Dallas-Fort Worth area were recovered during the monthlong operation.

The missing and exploited children were located by the federal agencies with the assistance of the Arlington Police Department, the Dallas Police Department, the Fort Worth Police Department, and the Grand Prairie Police Department.

At least seven of the 31 children were underage girls, who had “ties to sex trafficking.” Two of the female minors were recovered during prostitution stings, according to the Department of Justice.

“To observe law enforcement partnerships and community concerns culminate into such a successful recovery outcome is rewarding,” said acting United States Marshal Quintella Downs-Bradshaw. “Victims should know they are not forgotten, there is hope and a way to return home.”

“While this joint operation lasted approximately 30 days, HSI Dallas will continue working relentlessly to identify and recover missing children who become vulnerable to human traffickers across the North Texas region,” noted HSI Dallas Special Agent in Charge Ryan L. Spradlin. “Our continued collaboration with our local, state and federal law enforcement partners and non-governmental organizations is vital to combatting this global epidemic.”

Dallas Police Department Chief of Police Eddie Garcia added, “We are grateful to be a part of a coalition of extraordinary law enforcement agencies who were dedicated in reuniting these children with their loved ones. It is our hope that each of them will be able to put this traumatic experience behind them and move forward to have a happy and productive life.”

“We will continue to work with local, state, and federal partners to identify and rescue missing children,” said Arlington Chief of Police Al Jones. “These kids and teens represent some of our most vulnerable populations where adults try to prey on their innocence. We will not rest until every child is located safe and someone is held accountable.”

Fort Worth Police Department Chief Neil Noakes stated, “It is imperative that we continue to work with our partners to protect the most vulnerable members of our community, our children. We value our state and federal partnerships and were honored to be included as part of ‘Operation Missing in the Metroplex.’ We will continue to work closely with our law enforcement partnerships in locating missing children and reuniting them with their families. Human trafficking is a serious issue and we will not rest until our most vulnerable population are safe.”

In recent months, there have been several successful campaigns by the U.S. Marshals Service and local police to recover missing and endangered children.

“Operation Volunteer Strong” was a joint mission by the Marshals, Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, and Department of Children’s Service that rescued 150 missing children in Tennessee earlier this month.

Last month, “Operation Broken Hearts” ended with 37 people being apprehended in the Phoenix area for alleged child sex crimes and human trafficking.

In January, which was National Human Trafficking Awareness Month, “Operation Reclaim & Rebuild” resulted in the arrests of 64 people for alleged sex crimes in Riverside, California.

Also in January, multi-agency “Operation Lost Angels” led to the rescue of 33 missing children in California.

In November, U.S. Marshals located 27 missing children in Virginia during “Operation Find Our Children.”

In October, U.S. Marshals announced the recovery of 45 endangered children, plus the arrests of 178 suspects in Ohio and West Virginia during “Operation Autumn Hope.”

The U.S. Marshals Service found 11 missing New Orleans children in October, two of whom were said to be in “extreme danger.”

In September, 35 missing children were recovered in Ohio by U.S. Marshals in “Operation Safety Net.”

Marshals announced in September that eight “highly endangered” missing children were rescued during “Operation Homecoming” in Indiana.

In August, “Operation Not Forgotten” resulted in the discovery of 39 missing children in Florida and Georgia. Law enforcement said 15 of the missing kids were victims of sex trafficking.

Share
Categories
Endangered children human trafficking Intelwars Marshals operation Missing Children Operation volunteer strong Sex trafficking Tennessee US Marshals

150 missing children rescued in Tennessee during Operation Volunteer Strong

A monthslong, multi-agency operation has recovered 150 missing and endangered children in Tennessee. The recovery of the rescued children was announced Wednesday during a news conference at the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation headquarters in Nashville.

“Operation Volunteer Strong” was a joint mission by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation, Department of Children’s Service, and the U.S. Marshals Service that first started last fall. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children provided research and analytical support for the operation.

After months of planning, the teams began pursuing leads on 240 missing children on Jan. 4 in three regions: East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Eight of the missing children from Tennessee were found in other states.

Law enforcement recovered 150 juveniles, ranging in age from 3 to 17. One of the kids was rescued during an active kidnapping investigation, which resulted in the arrest of a suspect.

Five of the recovered children were identified as possible human trafficking victims, which sparked investigations by law enforcement. U.S. Marshal Denny W. King told WTVF that one recovered child had been missing for 460 days.

Two adults with outstanding warrants were apprehended during the investigation.

There are still 90 missing children, and authorities are actively trying to find them.

“This work is transformational, we cannot stop. And there is nothing more worthwhile,” Tennessee Department of Children’s Service Commissioner Jennifer Nichols said.

Rep. Tim Burchett (R-Tenn.) commended the agents involved in Operation Volunteer Strong.

“This operation had miraculous results, and I’m glad these children are reunited with their families. Sadly, this is a reminder there are sick and twisted people out there looking to exploit minors,” Burchett said. “I know the great folks who made Operation Volunteer Strong a success will continue their important work and help put a stop to this criminal activity.”

“Operation Volunteer Strong is a great example of how working together, we can find missing children and get them the help they need to move forward,” said John Clark, president and chief executive officer of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. “We’re thrilled to see so many missing children recovered in Tennessee, and we thank all the agencies involved for their dedication to child protection.”

David Jolley, U.S. Marshal for the Eastern District of Tennessee, released a statement.

“The U.S. Marshals are committed to assisting state and local agencies with locating and recovering endangered missing children to help prevent their falling victim to crimes of violence and exploitation,” Jolley said. “We will use every resource at our disposal to help find these missing children.”

“I hope this operation changes the course for 150 young lives and leads them to the path of opportunities every child deserves,” said Tyreece Miller, U.S. Marshal for the Western District of Tennessee. “Our efforts should also serve notice to those who prey on society’s most vulnerable that these children are not forgotten. Investigations will continue and the next knock at the door could be for you.”

Numerous operations have been successful recently in rescuing endangered children and arresting suspected sex traffickers.

Last month, Operation Broken Hearts resulted in 37 people being arrested in the Phoenix area for alleged child sex crimes and human trafficking.

During National Human Trafficking Awareness Month in January, “Operation Reclaim & Rebuild” resulted in the apprehension of 64 people for alleged sex crimes in Riverside, California.

“Operation Lost Angels,” a multi-agency human trafficking investigation led by the FBI in January, ended in the rescue of 33 missing children in California.

In November, Marshals recovered 27 missing children in Virginia during “Operation Find Our Children.”

In October, Marshals announced the recovery of 45 endangered children as well as the arrests of 178 suspects in Ohio and West Virginia during “Operation Autumn Hope.”

On Oct. 1, the U.S. Marshals Service located 11 children in New Orleans, two of whom were said to be in “extreme danger.”

On Sept. 21, 35 missing children were recovered in Ohio by the U.S. Marshals during “Operation Safety Net.”

On Sept. 4, Marshals announced that eight “highly endangered” missing children were rescued during “Operation Homecoming” in Indiana.

On Aug. 27, “Operation Not Forgotten” led to the discovery of 39 missing children in Florida and Georgia. Law enforcement stated 15 of the missing kids were victims of sex trafficking.

Share
Categories
Brittney gosney Brittney gosney murder Intelwars James robert hutchinson Middletown police Missing Children Ohio child disappearances

Mother reports 6-year-old son missing. Police say he died after she tried to abandon him and ran him over — and then she threw his body in the river.

An Ohio mother reportedly tried to abandon her child before eventually running him over with her car and throwing his body into the Ohio River, according to a report from NBC News.

What are the details?

Authorities arrested 29-year-old Brittney Gosney after she reported her 6-year-old son, James Robert Hutchinson, had gone missing.

Within hours, the Middletown Division of Police were looking at the case as a homicide investigation.

Court records obtained by the outlet state that during the investigation, Gosney admitted that she attempted to abandon her son at Rush Run Park in Worthington, Ohio, Sunday. When he attempted to get back into the car, Gosney said she sped off, ran over him, and dragged him “for a distance” before the child lost his grip on vehicle.

She told investigators that she returned to the scene approximately 30 minutes later to find him dead in the parking lot, having suffered an apparent head injury.

Initially, Gosney said that she took the body, brought it to her home in Middletown, and placed it in an upstairs bedroom. A day later, she said that she and her boyfriend, 42-year-old James Hamilton, drove her boy’s body to the Ohio River, where they dumped the body into the water.

Authorities are still working to recover the child’s body.

Authorities arrested Gosney and charged her with murder, abuse of a corpse, and tampering with evidence. Hamilton faces charges of abuse of a corpse and tampering with evidence.

On Monday, a local judge set Gosney’s bond at $1 million and Hamilton’s bond at $100,000.

Two other children who were living in Gosney’s home were removed and placed in emergency foster care.

Middletown Police Chief David Birk said that Gosney is “not showing much remorse at this time.”

WXIX-TV reported that Gosney’s other two children were inside the car with her the entire time.

“This has really touched my soul and my heart,” Birk said. “My kids are older, but my youngest is 16, but I’m just sitting there, you know, the poor six-year-old has no idea what’s going on and what’s happening, and for the other kids to go through this too. It’s just heartbreaking.”

The little boy’s father, Lewis Hutchinson, told WKRC-TV that he can’t fathom why Gosney would do this to their child.

“I love and you will always be my world,” he said of his son. “And I’m sorry for what your mom did to you. You didn’t deserve it. You have so much more of a life to live. I’m sorry I can’t do no more. I don’t understand what would drive someone to be a monster like that.”

“He was fun-loving and energetic,” Lewis added. “He was always concerned with other people. If he saw me down, he would give hugs and say, ‘It’s OK. What’s wrong?’ He was a very loving kid and he did not deserve this.”

In a letter to families at the little boy’s school, Rosa Parks Elementary School, Principal Tracy Neely wrote, “We are all mourning the loss of our friend James today. James was a happy and joyful soul who loved school. On the days he was in class, he would give hugs to all his teachers as he walked into school. A fun memory I have is the way his face would light up when he won the lucky lunch tray! First graders can find the joy in just about anything. I will always remember his bright joy.”

Gosney is due in court March 8.


Police chief: ‘Red flags all over’ in death of Middletown 6-year-old killed by mother

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
55 abductions Athletes Brian Ulicny Business Cammy Bowker Disturbing elitists Ernie Allen exploitation Headline News Intelwars Jeffrey Epstein Kansas city chiefs Kids Lolita Express LV minors Missing Children Politicians ruling class Sex trafficking super bowl Tamp Bay Buccaneers this is babylon United States wealthy

Pure Evil: The Boys and Girls Being Sold for Sex During COVID-19 and the Super Bowl

This article was originally published by John W. Whitehead at The Rutherford Institute.

Children are being targeted and sold for sex in America every day.”—John Ryan, National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Even in the midst of a COVID-19 pandemic, there’s no stopping this year’s Super Bowl LV showdown between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

While the winner of the Vince Lombardi Trophy is up for grabs, we already know the biggest losers: the hundreds of young girls and boys—some as young as 9 years old—who will be bought and sold for sex, as many as 20 times per day, during the course of the big game.

The Super Bowl is kind of deemed as the weekend to have sex with minors,” said Cammy Bowker, founder of Global Education Philanthropist.

It’s common to refer to this evil practice, which has become the fastest growing business in organized crime and the second most-lucrative commodity traded illegally after drugs and guns as child sex trafficking, but what we’re really talking about is rape.

Adults purchase children for sex at least 2.5 million times a year in the United States.

It is estimated that the number of children who are at risk of being bought and sold for sex would fill 1300 school buses.

Yet as shocking as those numbers may be, this COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in even greater numbers of children being preyed upon by child sex traffickers.

According to a recent study on human trafficking during the pandemic by Thomson-Reuters and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, school closures due to the pandemic, which has forced children out-of-school and subjected them to more online exposure, have made them especially vulnerable to sexual predators.

The internet, with its webcams and chat rooms—a necessity for virtual classrooms—has become the primary means of pimps targeting young children. “One in five kids online are sexually propositioned through gaming platforms and other social media. And those, non-contact oriented forums of sexual exploitation are increasing,” said researcher Brian Ulicny, who co-wrote the Thomson-Reuters study.

It’s not just young girls who are vulnerable to these predators, either.

According to a USA Today investigative report, “boys make up about 36% of children caught up in the U.S. sex industry (about 60% are female and less than 5% are transgender males and females).”

Consider this: every two minutes, a child is bought and sold for sex.

In Georgia alone, it is estimated that 7,200 men (half of them in their 30s) seek to purchase sex with adolescent girls each month, averaging roughly 300 a day.

On average, a child might be raped by 6,000 men during a five-year period.

It is estimated that at least 100,000 to 500,000 children—girls and boys—are bought and sold for sex in the U.S. every year, with as many as 300,000 children in danger of being trafficked each year. Some of these children are forcefully abducted, others are runaways, and still, others are sold into the system by relatives and acquaintances

Child rape has become Big Business in America.

This is not a problem found only in big cities.

It’s happening everywhere, right under our noses, in suburbs, cities, and towns across the nation.

As Ernie Allen of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children points out, “The only way not to find this in any American city is simply not to look for it.”

No doubt about it: this is a highly profitable, highly organized, and highly sophisticated sex trafficking business that operates in towns large and small, raking in upwards of $9.5 billion a year in the U.S. alone by abducting and selling young children for sex.

Every year, the ages of the girls and boys being bought and sold get younger and younger.

The average age of those being trafficked is 13. Yet as the head of a group that combats trafficking pointed out, “Let’s think about what average means. That means there are children younger than 13. That means 8-, 9-, 10-year-olds.”

They’re minors as young as 13 who are being trafficked,” noted a 25-year-old victim of trafficking. “They’re little girls.”

This is America’s dirty little secret.

But what or who is driving this evil appetite for young flesh? Who buys a child for sex?

Otherwise ordinary men from all walks of life. “They could be your co-worker, doctor, pastor or spouse,” writes journalist Tim Swarens, who spent more than a year investigating the sex trade in America.

Catholic and Protestant churches have been particularly singled out in recent years for harboring these sexual predators. Twenty years after the clergy sex abuse scandal rocked the Catholic Church, hundreds of sexual predators—priests, deacons, monks, and laypeople—continue to be given work assignments in proximity to children. In many cases, the abuse continues unabated.

Although much less publicized, the sex crimes within the Protestant Church have been no less egregious. For instance, an expose into the Southern Baptist Church leaders by the Houston Chronicle documents over 700 child sex victims “who were molested, sent explicit photos or texts, exposed to pornography, photographed nude, or repeatedly raped by youth pastors. Some victims as young as 3 were molested or raped inside pastors’ studies and Sunday school classrooms.”

And then you have national sporting events such as the Super Bowl, where sex traffickers have been caught selling minors, some as young as 9 years old. Yet even if the Super Bowl is not exactly a “windfall” for sex traffickers as some claim, it remains a lucrative source of income for the child sex trafficking industry and a draw for those who are willing to pay to rape young children.

According to criminal investigator Marc Chadderdon, these “buyers”—the so-called “ordinary” men who drive the demand for sex with children—represent a cross-section of American society: every age, every race, every socio-economic background, cops, teachers, corrections workers, pastors, etc.

And then there are the extra-ordinary men, such as Jeffrey Epstein, the hedge fund billionaire / convicted serial pedophile who was arrested on charges of molesting, raping, and sex trafficking dozens of young girls, only to die under highly unusual circumstances.

It is believed that Epstein operated his own personal sex trafficking ring not only for his personal pleasure but also for the pleasure of his friends and business associates. According to The Washington Post, “several of the young women…say they were offered to the rich and famous as sex partners at Epstein’s parties.” At various times, Epstein ferried his friends about on his private plane, nicknamed the “Lolita Express.”

Men like Epstein and his cronies, who belong to a powerful, wealthy, elite segment of society that operates according to their own rules, skate free of accountability by taking advantage of a criminal justice system that panders to the powerful, the wealthy, and the elite.

Still, where did this appetite for young girls come from?

Look around you.

Young girls have been sexualized for years now in music videos, on billboards, in television ads, and in clothing stores. Marketers have created a demand for young flesh and a ready supply of over-sexualized children.

“In a market that sells high heels for babies and thongs for tweens, it doesn’t take a genius to see that sex, if not porn, has invaded our lives,” writes Jessica Bennett for Newsweek. “Whether we welcome it or not, television brings it into our living rooms and the Web brings it into our bedrooms. According to a 2007 study from the University of Alberta, as many as 90 percent of boys and 70 percent of girls aged 13 to 14 have accessed sexually explicit content at least once.”

This is what Bennett refers to as the “pornification of a generation.”

Indeed as I documented in an earlier column, the culture is grooming these young people to be preyed upon by sexual predators.

Social media makes it all too easy. As one news center reported, “Finding girls is easy for pimps. They look on … social networks. They and their assistants cruise malls, high schools, and middle schools. They pick them up at bus stops. On the trolley. Girl-to-girl recruitment sometimes happens.” Foster homes and youth shelters have also become prime targets for traffickers.

Rarely do these girls enter into prostitution voluntarily. Many start out as runaways or throwaways, only to be snatched up by pimps or larger sex rings. Others persuaded to meet up with a stranger after interacting online through one of the many social networking sites, find themselves quickly initiated into their new lives as sex slaves.

Debbie, a straight-A student who belonged to a close-knit Air Force family living in Phoenix, Ariz., is an example of this trading of flesh. Debbie was 15 when she was snatched from her driveway by an acquaintance-friend. Forced into a car, Debbie was bound and taken to an unknown location, held at gunpoint, and raped by multiple men. She was then crammed into a small dog kennel and forced to eat dog biscuits. Debbie’s captors advertised her services on Craigslist. Those who responded were often married with children, and the money that Debbie “earned” for sex was given to her kidnappers. The gang raping continued. After searching the apartment where Debbie was held captive, police finally found Debbie stuffed in a drawer under a bed. Her harrowing ordeal lasted for 40 days.

While Debbie was fortunate enough to be rescued, others are not so lucky.

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, nearly 800,000 children go missing every year (roughly 2,185 children a day).

With a growing demand for sexual slavery and an endless supply of girls and women who can be targeted for abduction, this is not a problem that’s going away anytime soon.

For those trafficked, it’s a nightmare from beginning to end.

Those being sold for sex have an average life expectancy of seven years, and those years are a living nightmare of endless rape, forced drugging, humiliation, degradation, threats, disease, pregnancies, abortions, miscarriages, torture, pain, and always the constant fear of being killed or, worse, having those you love hurt or killed.

Immigration and customs enforcement agents at the Cyber Crimes Center in Fairfax, Va., report that when it comes to sex, the appetites of many Americans have now changed. What was once considered abnormal is now the norm. These agents are tracking a clear spike in the demand for harder-core pornography on the Internet. As one agent noted, “We’ve become desensitized by the soft stuff; now we need a harder and harder hit.”

This trend is reflected by the treatment many of the girls receive at the hands of the drug traffickers and the men who purchase them. A common thread woven through most survivors’ experiences is being forced to go without sleep or food until they have met their sex quota of at least 40 men.

As David McSwane recounts in a chilling piece for the Herald-Tribune: “In Oakland Park, an industrial Fort Lauderdale suburb, federal agents in 2011 encountered a brothel operated by a married couple. Inside ‘The Boom Boom Room,’ as it was known, customers paid a fee and were given a condom and a timer and left alone with one of the brothel’s eight teenagers, children as young as 13. A 16-year-old foster child testified that he acted as security, while a 17-year-old girl told a federal judge she was forced to have sex with as many as 20 men a night.”

One particular sex trafficking ring catered specifically to migrant workers employed seasonally on farms throughout the southeastern states, especially the Carolinas and Georgia, although it’s a flourishing business in every state in the country. Traffickers transport the women from farm to farm, where migrant workers would line up outside shacks, as many as 30 at a time, to have sex with them before they were transported to yet another farm where the process would begin all over again.

This growing evil is, for all intents and purposes, out in the open.

That so many children continue to be victimized, brutalized, and treated like human cargo is due to three things: one, a consumer demand that is increasingly lucrative for everyone involved—except the victims; two, a level of corruption so invasive on both a local and international scale that there is little hope of working through established channels for change; and three, an eerie silence from individuals who fail to speak out against such atrocities.

Unfortunately, while the government’s war on sex trafficking—much like the government’s war on terrorism, drugs, and crime, which I describe in greater detail in my book Battlefield America: The War on the American People—has become a perfect excuse for inflicting more police state tactics (police checkpoints, searches, surveillance, and heightened security) on a vulnerable public, it has done little to protect our children from sex predators.

Like so many of the evils in our midst, sex trafficking (and the sexualization of young people) is a cultural disease that is rooted in the American police state’s heart of darkness. It speaks to a sordid, far-reaching corruption that stretches from the highest seats of power (governmental and corporate) down to the most hidden corners and relies on our silence and our complicity to turn a blind eye to wrongdoing.

The post Pure Evil: The Boys and Girls Being Sold for Sex During COVID-19 and the Super Bowl first appeared on SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You.

Share
Categories
Child abuse child trafficking Child trafficking 2021 FBI human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Us marhals

33 missing children rescued in anti-human trafficking operation in California

A multi-agency anti-human trafficking operation led by the FBI rescued 33 missing children in southern California. The Federal Bureau of Investigation announced the news about the investigation on Friday in a press release.

Operation Lost Angels launched on Jan. 11 and found 33 “vulnerable missing children,” eight of which were said to be being sexually exploited or trafficked when law enforcement saved them, according to the feds.

“Two were recovered multiple times during the operation while on the ‘track,’ a common term used to describe a known location for commercial sex trafficking,” the FBI said. “It is not uncommon for victims who are rescued to return to commercial sex trafficking either voluntarily or by force, fraud, or coercion.”

“This harmful cycle highlights the challenges victims face and those faced by law enforcement when attempting to keep victims from returning to an abusive situation,” the news release stated. “Victims may not self-identify as being trafficked or may not even realize they’re being trafficked.”

The operation resulted in the arrest of a suspected human trafficker on state charges. One of the minors had been unlawfully kidnapped by a parent.

“The FBI considers human trafficking modern day slavery and the minors engaged in commercial sex trafficking are considered victims,” FBI assistant director Kristi K. Johnson said. “While this operation surged resources over a limited period of time with great success, the FBI and our partners investigate child sex trafficking every day of the year and around the clock.”

In 2020, the FBI conducted 664 human trafficking investigations across the country, which resulted in the arrests of 473 human traffickers.

Operation Lost Angels, which was executed during Human Trafficking Awareness Month, involved more than two dozen law enforcement departments, including the Los Angeles Police Department, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, San Diego Police Department, California Highway Patrol, and the United States Marshal’s Service.

The U.S. Marshals have been involved in numerous successful operations to find missing children in the past year.

In November, the U.S. Marshals rescued 27 missing children in Virginia during “Operation Find Our Children.”

In October, the Marshals announced the recovery of 45 missing and endangered children in Ohio and West Virginia during “Operation Autumn Hope.” The operation led to 179 arrests that were made by the Central Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force.

On Oct. 1, the Marshals Service announced they rescued 11 children in New Orleans, two of which were said to be in “extreme danger.

On Sept. 21, U.S. Marshals rescued 35 missing children during “Operation Safety Net” in Ohio.

On Sept. 17, U.S. Marshals Service executed “Operation Triple Beam,” a 60-day mission to decrease violent gang crime in Oklahoma City. U.S. Marshals made 262 arrests, seized illegal firearms and narcotics, as well as located five missing children.

On Sept. 4, Marshals declared that they had rescued eight “highly endangered” missing children in Indiana during “Operation Homecoming.”

On Aug. 27, “Operation Not Forgotten” resulted in the discovery of 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida. Authorities said the children were between the ages of 3 to 17. Of the 39 endangered children, 15 were victims of sex trafficking.

Share
Categories
Child trafficking 2020 Crime human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Sex trafficking US Marshals Virginia

US Marshals rescue 27 missing kids in Virginia during ‘Operation Find Our Children’

The Department of Justice announced on Friday that the U.S. Marshals had rescued 27 missing children in Virginia during “Operation Find Our Children.” The mission lasted only five days, but was able to recover 27 missing kids throughout the state, and located six more children who were reported as missing but were found to be in the custody of their legal guardian.

The multi-agency effort involved more than 60 law enforcement investigators, including members from the U.S. Marshals from the Eastern and Western Districts of Virginia, U.S. Marshals Service Capital Area Regional Fugitive Task Force, federal and state law enforcement agents, and local police departments.

There were also over 50 employees from the Virginia Department of Social Services, as well as a team of medical professionals and experts from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

“I can think of no more critical or satisfying mission for a law enforcement officer, than rescuing an endangered child,” Nick E. Proffitt, U.S. Marshal for the Eastern District of Virginia, said. “This operation brought together a formidable team that was, and is, determined to come to the aid of our youth and bring to justice those among us that choose to prey on these vulnerable children.”

“I am proud of the Deputy Marshals in the Eastern and Western Districts of Virginia and their partners for the work they accomplished this week – and the results speak for themselves; these 27 children are safe once again,” Proffitt continued. “I am deeply humbled and highly honored that our team in Eastern Virginia is a continuing part of this critical Marshals Service mission. We want the missing children across this great nation to know the U.S. Marshals Service will never stop looking for you, we will find you.”

“The U.S. Marshals Service has a legendary history of finding fugitives and bringing them to justice,” Thomas L. Foster, U.S. Marshal for the Western District of Virginia, said. “Because of this specialized skill set, finding missing children is a natural extension of the Marshal’s mission.”

“Although many of the 27 recoveries occurred in Virginia’s larger population centers, seven occurred in the Western District of Virginia to include Roanoke and Abingdon,” Foster added. “This operation brought missing and exploited children to a place of safety and those who made the decision to prey upon them to justice.”

“The Department of Justice is dedicated to protecting the most vulnerable children in our society and ‘Operation Find Our Children’ does just that,” Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen said. “While this Virginia operation is the most recent recovery of endangered and missing children led by the U.S. Marshals Service this year, we have also recovered more than 440 kids in Georgia, Ohio, Indiana, Louisiana and other states. Because of this initiative, the recovered children are now out of harm’s way.”

Last week, the United States Marshals Service announced the recovery of 45 missing and endangered children in Ohio and West Virginia during “Operation Autumn Hope.” The operation also resulted in 179 arrests that were made by the Central Ohio Human Trafficking Task Force.

On Oct. 1, the agency rescued 11 children in New Orleans, two of which were in “extreme danger.

On Sept. 21, U.S. Marshals announced that they had recovered 35 missing children during “Operation Safety Net” in Ohio.

On Sept. 17, U.S. Marshals Service completed “Operation Triple Beam,” a 60-day mission to decrease violent gang crime in Oklahoma City. U.S. Marshals made 262 arrests, seized illegal firearms and narcotics, as well as located five missing children,

On Sept. 4, the U.S. Marshals Service said that they had rescued eight “highly endangered” missing children in Indiana during “Operation Homecoming.”

On Aug. 27, U.S. Marshals found 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida during “Operation Not Forgotten.” Authorities said the children were between the ages of 3 to 17. Of the 39 endangered children, 15 were victims of sex trafficking.

Share
Categories
AMBER alert child trafficking Endangered children human trafficking Intelwars KIDNAPPING Missing Children US Marshals

US Marshals rescue 11 missing runaway children in New Orleans; 2 boys were in ‘extreme danger’

In “Operation Summer Rescue 2020,” the U.S. Marshals Service focused on tracking down missing runaway children originally from New Orleans. During the two-month operation funded by the agency’s Missing Child Unit, U.S. Marshals rescued 11 endangered children, including two boys who were reportedly in extreme danger.

Of the 11 children located, one of them was a 16-year-old boy was found in New Orleans. Authorities believe that the teen was involved in illegal gang activity, including the possession of firearms.

U.S. Marshals tracked down a missing 13-year-old girl, who was found in Nashville, Tennessee. The recovery of the girl included the assistance of the U.S. Marshals Service of Middle District Tennessee Task Force, Metro Nashville Police Department, and the FBI New Orleans Field Office, according to the U.S. Marshals press release.

Operation Summer Rescue 2020, which took place between Aug. 1 through Sept. 30, also made several arrests during the rescues. An adult male was arrested for aggravated statutory rape.

A mother wanted on a first-degree murder warrant out of Mississippi was apprehended. She allegedly murdered her 11-year-old son at a hotel in Laurel, Mississippi. U.S. Marshals recovered her two other sons, ages 6 and 9, who were considered to be in “extreme danger” and an Amber Alert had been issued to locate them.

“This is a very important mission that the USMS has been tasked by Congress to oversee, as the safety of children across the country is paramount to this nation’s future,” said U.S. Marshal for the Eastern District of Louisiana Scott Illing. “While 11 recoveries may not seem high, this work, which is time consuming, was accomplished while also running our normal day-to-day violent felony offender investigations and sex offender fugitive operations in the district, along with our other judicial missions.”

In the past month and a half, the U.S. Marshals Service has rescued nearly 100 missing and endangered children.

Last week, U.S. Marshals reported that they had rescued 35 missing children during “Operation Safety Net” in Ohio.

On Sept. 17, U.S. Marshals Service wrapped up “Operation Triple Beam,” a 60-day mission to reduce violent gang crime in Oklahoma City. U.S. Marshals rescued five missing children, made 262 arrests, plus seized illegal firearms and narcotics.

On Sept. 4, the U.S. Marshals Service announced that they rescued eight “highly endangered” missing children in Indiana during “Operation Homecoming.”

On Aug. 27, U.S. Marshals located 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida during “Operation Not Forgotten.” Authorities said the children were between the ages of 3 to 17. Of the 39 endangered children, 15 were victims of sex trafficking.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement participated in a multi-agency operation last month that resulted in the arrest of five suspected child sexual predators. “Operation Home Alone 2” was able to successfully “target sexual predators who attempted to lure underage children with the intent of engaging in sexual activity.”

Share
Categories
child trafficking Child trafficking 2020 human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Operation safety net Sex trafficking US Marshals

US Marshals rescue 35 missing and endangered children during ‘Operation Safety Net’ in Ohio

The U.S. Marshals Service continues its mission to locate missing children. The U.S. Marshals announced this week that they had rescued 35 missing and endangered children during “Operation Safety Net” in Ohio.

Operation Safety Net, a joint investigation by the U.S. Marshals Service and local police in Ohio, tracked down 35 missing kids from the Cuyahoga County area. The lost children, who were between the ages of 13 and 18, were found in Ohio cities, including Cleveland, Akron, and Columbus, as well as Miami, Florida.

More than 20% of the endangered children were tied to human trafficking cases, according to the news release from the U.S. Marshals Service.

“This was new unchartered territory and the first time we conducted an operation like this,” U.S. Marshal Pete Elliott said in a statement on Monday. “I am very proud of our law enforcement, community and media partners who worked tirelessly to bring our missing and most vulnerable children to safety. The establishment of a permanent unit in Northern Ohio will ensure that our most vulnerable missing children will continue to be found and brought to safety.”

Newburgh Heights Police Chief John Majoy said his department was “proud to assist in Operation Safety Net,” and commended the United States Marshals Service for “their hard work and dedication toward locating these children.”

“Many times, they do not know they are a victim and this operation offers hope, freedom and safety they would not otherwise have,” Majoy said. “This is a fine example of local, state and federal partners all working together for a notable cause. Together we can all make a difference.”

Operation Safety Net is still working on five cases that remain open, which will be handled by the Marshals Task Force and local law enforcement in the next several weeks. The missing children they are looking for are Leantwana Bates, 17, Yalonda Bates, 15, Ja-Niya Scott-Lee, 16, Alicia Jackson, 16, and Issac Ortiz, 16.

Following the success of Operation Safety Net, a permanent Missing Child Unit was created in northern Ohio “to focus on those missing, abused, neglected and trafficked juveniles.”

In the last four weeks, U.S. Marshals have located nearly 90 missing and endangered children.

In late August, the U.S. Marshals Service located 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida during “Operation Not Forgotten.” The Marshals said the children were between the ages of 3 to 17. Of the 39 endangered children, 15 were victims of sex trafficking.

Earlier this month, U.S. Marshals reported that they rescued eight “highly endangered” missing children in Indiana during “Operation Homecoming.”

Last week, U.S. Marshals Service wrapped up “Operation Triple Beam,” a 60-day mission to reduce violent gang crime in Oklahoma City. U.S. Marshals rescued five missing children, made 262 arrests, and seized illegal firearms and narcotics.

The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement participated in a multi-agency operation that resulted in the arrest of five suspected child sexual predators. “Operation Home Alone 2” was able to successfully “target sexual predators who attempted to lure underage children with the intent of engaging in sexual activity.”

Share
Categories
child trafficking Gang arrests Intelwars Missing Children Operation triple beam US Marshals

US Marshals arrest 262 suspects, rescue 5 missing children in ‘Operation Triple Beam’

The U.S. Marshals Service wrapped up a 60-day operation that had the mission of reducing violent gang crime in Oklahoma City. During “Operation Triple Beam,” U.S. Marshals made 262 arrests, rescued five missing children, and seized illegal firearms and narcotics.

Operation Triple Beam concluded on Sept. 6. Of the 262 people arrested, 141 were confirmed gang members, and six people were wanted for homicide, according to KFOR-TV. Other suspects were charged with felony assault, sexual assault, illegal possession of firearms, illegal drug distribution, robbery, and arson.

On July 31, U.S. Marshals apprehended Pablo Robledo, a Surenos gang member who escaped from the Oklahoma County Detention Center while awaiting murder charges by busting out a window and using several bedsheets to scale down the building.

On Aug. 12, law enforcement officers arrested Chasady and Charles Hall; both believed to be Dungee Crip members. The couple reportedly kidnapped their children from an Oklahoma City daycare. The children were in the custody of the state’s Department of Human Services.

U.S. Marshals also seized 72 firearms, more than 9 kilograms of narcotics, and nearly $17,000.

Operation Triple Beam combined several agencies, including the Oklahoma City police, Oklahoma Highway Patrol, Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office, Shawnee and Yukon Police Departments, Pottawatomie County Sheriff’s Office, Comanche County Detention, Oklahoma Department of Corrections, Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics, Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, Oklahoma County District Attorney’s Office, United States Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Oklahoma, and Homeland Security Investigations.

“Operation Triple Beam OKC was a targeted enforcement initiative by the Marshals and their partners to address violent crime in and around Oklahoma City,” said Johnny Kuhlman, a U.S. marshal for the Western District of Oklahoma. “Our primary goal with operations like OTB is to make communities safer. When we arrest these violent fugitives, we are also removing guns and narcotics from our streets. We believe these efforts have an immediate, positive impact on the communities we serve.”

The U.S. Marshals have located at least 77 missing and at-risk children in the past few weeks.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Marshals Service announced they rescued eight “highly endangered” missing children in Indiana during “Operation Homecoming.”

In late August, Marshals located 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida during “Operation Not Forgotten.” The U.S. Marshals said the children were between the ages of 3 to 17, and 15 of the children were victims of sex trafficking. Law enforcement cleared 26 warrants during the two-week operation.

Also last month, U.S. Marshals tracked down 25 missing and endangered children from Ohio during “Operation Safety Net.” The missing children ranged in age from 13 and 18, and were found as far away as Miami. U.S. Marshals said that a quarter of the endangered children were victims of human trafficking and prostitution.

Last week, the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement participated in a multi-agency operation that resulted in the arrest of five suspected child sexual predators. “Operation Home Alone 2” was able to successfully “target sexual predators who attempted to lure underage children with the intent of engaging in sexual activity.”

Share
Categories
child trafficking human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Operation homecoming Operation not forgotten Operation safety net US Marshals Us marshals service missing child unit

US Marshals rescue 8 ‘highly endangered’ missing children in Indiana during ‘Operation Homecoming’

The U.S. Marshals announced this week that they had located and rescued eight missing children in Indiana. The missing children recovered in “Operation Homecoming” were said to be “highly endangered.”

The children were “considered to be some of the most at-risk and challenging recovery cases in the area based on indications of high-risk factors such as victimization of child sex trafficking, child exploitation, sex abuse, physical abuse and medical or mental health conditions,” according to the statement released by the U.S. Marshals Service, Southern District of Indiana.

The missing children, who were between the ages of 6 and 17, were rescued and handed over to the Indiana Department of Child Services.

During the five-day Operation Homecoming in the Indianapolis area, one adult was arrested and faces charges related to parental kidnapping, intimidation, weapons possession, and custodial interference, the United States Marshals Service stated.

Operation Homecoming took place from Aug. 31 to Sept. 4, but involved several months of planning and coordination between multiple agencies. The agencies involved in the operation include the U.S. Marshals Service Missing Child Unit, U.S. Marshals Service Great Lakes Regional Fugitive Task Force, Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

“The Marshals are committed to assisting state and local agencies with locating and recovering endangered missing children to help prevent their falling victim to crimes of violence and exploitation,” said Dan McClain, U.S. Marshal for the Southern District of Indiana. “The message that we wish to convey to the missing children and their families is that we will use every resource at our disposal to find you.”

Over the last two weeks, the U.S. Marshals have announced the rescue of 72 missing children.

Last month, U.S. Marshals located 39 missing children in Georgia and Florida during “Operation Not Forgotten.” Authorities said the children ranged in age from 3 to 17 years old. The U.S. Marshals Service said that 15 of the children were victims of sex trafficking, according to WAGA-TV.

There were 26 warrants cleared during the two-week operation, including “19 arrest warrants for a total of nine individuals arrested, some of whom had multiple warrants,” according to the U.S. Marshals.

In late August, U.S. Marshals announced that they had tracked down 25 missing and endangered children from Ohio during Operation Safety Net. The missing children were between the ages of 13 and 18, and were located in Cleveland, Euclid, Willoughby, and as far away as Miami, Florida.

U.S. Marshals said that a quarter of the endangered children were victims of human trafficking and prostitution.

“These are kids that have been abused, neglected. Some involved in human trafficking,” U.S. Marshal Pete Elliott told WOIO-TV. “Sometimes the situations they — they go to, believe it or not, may be better than the situations they left from. We’ve had some cases where the mother and or father, or both, may have been prostituting their own child.”

“We’re trying to do our part. A number of these children have gone to the hospital after we’ve recovered them to get checked out, so again this is something we take very seriously,” Elliott added. “I’ll tell you this, it will be something we’ll be doing every year. This is our first time we have done this, it’s been uncharted territory for us, but we’ve had great success.”

There were 421,394 entries for missing children in 2019, according to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center. The U.S. Marshals helped recover 295 missing children in 2019, and more than 1,800 since teaming up with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in 2005.

Share
Categories
Attempted kidnapping Baby kidnapping Flagstaff Arizona Flagstaff kidnapping Grocery store kidnapping Intelwars Kidnapping baby Missing Children

Stunning surveillance video shows man attempting to kidnap baby from mother at grocery store

Surveillance video captured a mother’s nightmare scenario when a man attempted to kidnap a baby sitting in a grocery cart during a shopping trip in Flagstaff, Arizona.

The harrowing incident unfolded on Thursday morning at about 9:30 a.m. at a Bashas’ grocery store.

The video showed the mom standing in the self-checkout aisle with the baby in the grocery cart and the man standing behind her completing his own purchase.

Without warning, he nonchalantly grabs the cart and starts walking out as if it belonged to him. Other shoppers can be seen standing around in the aisle.

Police say that the mother quickly noticed that the man was trying to run off with her cart and she was able to stop him and get her baby back.

Local news reporters tweeted screenshots from the surveillance video in order to help police find a suspect.

Police said they had identified a suspect and apprehended him four hours later.

The Criminal Investigations Detectives said that the investigation is ongoing, according to KOLD-TV.

According to FBI statistics, about 350 people under the age of 18 are kidnapped every year in the United States. Hundreds of thousands of juveniles are reported missing to the FBI every year, but of those, about 95% are classified as runaways. Only about 0.1%, or one in a thousand, are reported as abductions by a stranger.

“It doesn’t happen very often, but they’re certainly the cases that capture our attention because they strike at our worst fears,” said Robert Lowery, the vice president at the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, to Reuters.

Here’s part of the surveillance video from the incident:


Security camera captures attempted infant kidnapping at Flagstaff store

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
Child abuse child sex trafficking human trafficking Intelwars Missing Children Sex Offenders Sex trafficking US Marshals Us marshals service missing child unit

US Marshals rescue 39 missing children, arrest suspects on human- and sex-trafficking charges

U.S. Marshals tracked down 39 missing children during a two-week operation in Georgia and Florida.

The U.S. Marshals Service Missing Child Unit, in conjunction with the agency’s Southeast Regional Fugitive Task Force, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, worked with state and local agencies in Georgia to locate endangered children. U.S. Marshals rescued 26 missing children and safely located 13 others during “Operation Not Forgotten.”

Investigators said the children ranged in age from 3 to 17. The U.S. Marshals Service identified 15 of the children as being victims of sex trafficking, according to WAGA-TV.

“Additionally, investigators cleared 26 arrest warrants and filed additional charges for alleged crimes related to sex trafficking, parental kidnapping, registered sex offender violations, drugs and weapons possession, and custodial interference,” the official U.S. Marshals news release read. “The 26 warrants cleared included 19 arrest warrants for a total of nine individuals arrested, some of whom had multiple warrants.”

According to WTSP-TV, the nine suspects and charges include:

  • Moradeyo Amos Bandele – Arrested in Port St Lucy, Fla. – Warrant for rape from Conyers, GA
  • Trayon Moore – Arrested in Dekalb County, Ga. – Sex trafficking and probation violation warrants
  • James Garcia – Arrested at a motel in Clearwater, Fla. – Warrants for aggravated child molestation, aggravated sodomy and incest with a minor out of Whitfield County, Ga.
  • Faye Smith – Arrested at a motel in Clearwater, Fla. – Warrant for probation violation
  • Sally Garcia – Arrested at a motel in Clearwater, Fla. – Interference with child custody
  • Zachary Bailey – Arrested in Columbus, Ga. – Human trafficking, enticing of a minor for indecent purposes, and enticement of a minor for solicitation
  • Stanson Causey – Arrested in Jasper, Ga. – Registered sex offender arrested for probation violation
  • Kirk Waters – Arrested in Newton County, Ga. – Felon in possession of a firearm
  • Trevonte Shareef – Arrested in Newton County, Ga. – Interference with custody and obstruction

“The U.S. Marshals Service is fully committed to assisting federal, state, and local agencies with locating and recovering endangered missing children, in addition to their primary fugitive apprehension mission,” Director of the Marshals Service Donald Washington said in a statement. “The message to missing children and their families is that we will never stop looking for you.

“I have children. I’m sure many of you do as well. These are not my kids and these are not your kids, but actually they are our kids when it’s all said and done,” Washington said. “Here in Atlanta, approximately 300 young girls are lured into sex trafficking every month.”

“We’re really good and what we do. You know, they’ve called us manhunters. Well, we’re not just man hunters anymore,” Darby Kirby, chief inspector of the U.S. Marshals Service Missing Child Unit, said. “We also help save and rescue children as well.

“When we track down fugitives, it’s a good feeling to know that we’re putting the bad guy behind bars,” Kirby added. “But that sense of accomplishment is nothing compared to finding a missing child.”

“To address [sex trafficking], it requires agents, foot soldiers and prosecutors that are willing to take the fight to the enemy,” Georgia Bureau of Investigation Assistant Director John Melvin said.

“I always go back to the fact that if we can save one child from a life of abuse or sex trafficking, we’ve done our job,” Georgia Attorney General Christopher Carr said.

“The Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act of 2015 enhanced the U.S. Marshals’ authority to assist federal, state, and local law enforcement with the recovery of missing, endangered or abducted children, regardless of whether a fugitive or sex offender was involved,” the U.S. Marshals news release stated. “The Marshals established a Missing Child Unit to oversee and manage the implementation of its enhanced authority under the act.”

According to the FBI’s National Crime Information Center, there were 421,394 entries for missing children in 2019. The United States Marshals Service helped recover 295 missing children in 2019, and more than 1,800 since parenting with the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in 2005.


LIVE: U.S. Marshals & Georgia law enforceent reveal results of Operation Not Forgotten

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
amazon Boston cabinets CEO child trafficking Claims connect the dots Conspiracy Fact and Theory deleted items fact checkers federal reserve board Ghislaine Maxwell Immigration and Customs Enforcement Intelwars Jeffrey Epstein lost kids Mainstream media Missing Children missing children's names Niraj Shah online retailers overpriced Pizzagate smoking gun Social Media throw pillows Walmart Wayfair

Strange Things Happening: Epstein, Maxwell, Online Retailers, & Child Trafficking

Jeffrey Epstein and Ghislaine Maxwell at Cipriani Wall Street on March 15, 2005 in New York City. (Photo by Joe Schildhorn/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

Very strange things took place at the online retailer, Wayfair in recent days. The “fact-checkers” have already made sure to classify this “conspiracy theory” as “false” though, so don’t think about it, and go back to sleep.

The newest “news” that mainstream media is desperately trying to get you to ignore, involves child trafficking.  It’s not a complete shock, but when the media distracts and the “fact-checkers” go into overdrive for something they claim is “false,” we should probably take a closer look at what’s going on.

Social media users shared screenshots of the cabinets, which cost upward of $14,000, and speculated that the items were in fact missing children who could be purchased through Wayfair’s website, according to a report by Business Insider. The odd thing that they won’t explain, however, is how the overpriced cabinets and throw pillows came with the names of missing children:

Don’t worry though! Wayfair investigated themselves and found that they have done nothing wrong and the mainstream media agrees. “There is, of course, no truth to these claims,” a Wayfair spokesperson said in a statement to Business Insider. “The products in question are industrial grade cabinets that are accurately priced.” What about the $9,999.00 for a personalized throw pillow named after missing children? Were those priced accurately? Who do these people think they are trying to fool?

There is also a long list of ties to Jeffrey Epstein, Ghislaine Maxwell, and Wayfair. Probably just a coincidence, right? The mainstream media also conversely ignored the fact that Wayfair’s CEO, Niraj Shah, also serves on the board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.

As Josh Sigurdson says in the video below “there are huge child trafficking rings and the government is involved.” He says Wayfair provides beds for ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) and a lot of children mysteriously go missing from their custody. Mainstream media sources will back up those claims, but they did not connect the dots, as alternative media has been doing.  Listen at 8:00 for Sigurdson’s explanation and the “dot-connecting” you will not hear about on Fox News or CNN. MSM, all of them, are covering this up:

“All I know, is with Walmart, Amazon, and Wayfair getting caught with all these high priced items with names of missing people, tied to codes and order numbers that if you search on Yandex come up with children, it could be a huge 4Chan hoax, but something really weird is happening,” says Sigurdson.

As Many as 8 Million Children Are Kidnapped and Trafficked Into Sex Slavery Every Year by Global Pedophile Network – of Which Many Politicians Are Members

Those are fairly uncommon names, but it’s probably a coincidence, right? Some social media users said the names of the cabinets —  Neriah, Yaritza, Samiyah, and Alyvia all appeared to match the names of missing children.  And oddly, since Wayfair said they did nothing wrong after the posts picked up steam on social media, the cabinet listings suddenly disappeared from the company’s website. This obviously generated even more suspicion. If the cabinets were accurately priced, why remove them? Why not just take the names off?

“There is, of course, no truth to these claims,” a Wayfair spokesperson said in a statement to Business Insider. “The products in question are industrial grade cabinets that are accurately priced. Recognizing that the photos and descriptions provided by the supplier did not adequately explain the high price point, we have temporarily removed the products from site to rename them and to provide a more in-depth description and photos that accurately depict the product to clarify the price point.”

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, roughly 800,000 children are reported missing each year in the United States — that’s roughly 2,000 per day. Of those, there are 115 child “stranger abduction” cases each year, which means the child was taken by an unknown person. –ABC News

It could all be a coincidence.  Maybe, but what we do know is pretty disturbing, and the mainstream media isn’t even looking just a little bit into this.  They immediately did damage control for Wayfair instead of investigating it. “I think there is some form of legitimacy to this, I just don’t know what it is yet,” Sigurdson added.

 

Share
Categories
AMBER alert child services Evelyn boswell Evelyn boswell disappearance Intelwars Missing Children Tennessee child missing

Tennessee toddler went missing in December. Authorities want to know why her parents didn’t report her disappearance until this week.

Fifteen-month-old Evelyn Boswell has reportedly been missing since the day after Christmas, but her family only just reported the toddler’s disappearance on Tuesday, according to authorities.

On Wednesday, the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation requested that the Sullivan County Sheriff’s Office issue an Amber Alert for the missing child.

What are the details?

The Tennessean reported that investigators are attempting to determine why the child’s family took so long to report her missing.

Tennessee Bureau of Investigation spokesperson Leslie Earhart announced Friday that the child was last seen wearing a pink tracksuit, pink shoes, and a pink bow. Evelyn stands 2-feet tall and weighs 28 pounds. She has blonde hair and blue eyes.

On Friday, the bureau tweeted that individuals in a “gray 2007 BMW with TN tag 3M9-6W9 have information regarding Evelyn Boswell’s whereabouts.” The bureau pointed out that the vehicle has front-end damage.

Anyone with information on the child’s disappearance or whereabouts should call 911 and report and details about the case to 1-800-TBI-FIND.

What else do we know?

According to WATE-TV, a Blountville, Tennessee, man told authorities that he dated who he claimed was the child’s mother — Megan “Maggie” Boswell — for a few weeks, but never saw the child.

“All I’ve seen is pictures of [the child], I’ve never even seen the baby,” the man, identified as Hunter Wood of Hunter T’s Chicken Shack, told the station. “I have no relationship with that child whatsoever.”

Wood said that he met the woman when she applied for a job at his restaurant.

Wood added that the child was staying with a man he identified as her father — Ethan Perry — in December. Perry was reportedly home on military leave for the Christmas holiday.

“While Evelyn’s father, Ethan, had the child, the baby, you know, fell off the bed and broke her arm, and he took her to the hospital,” he added. “That’s what I was told.”

“They have half custody to the best of my knowledge,” Wood continued. “It’s not my business to dig further into that because we weren’t that serious for me to dig further.”

He added that he only wants authorities to find the child.

“I’m not doing this to, you know, hurt this investigation because all in all the entire matter here of what’s going on and what needs to be resolved is finding that baby,” he told the station.

Share