Categories
Defund the police gun violence Intelwars Minneapolis Minneapolis city council minneapolis police Violence

‘Living in a war zone’: Minneapolis residents ‘terrified’ of increased gun violence call out elected officials, demanding, ‘Show your face to us!’

Minneapolis has been seeing a serious spike gun violence in the months since the death of George Floyd. After the tragic incident, the City Council called for a defunding of the police. As violence began to rage, the those same elected city officials demanded to know where the police were.

And now, as their city is experiencing more gunfire on a daily basis and residents are worried for their lives in what some call a “war zone,” the members of the city council are apparently no where to be found.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said the gun violence in Minneapolis is like nothing the department has seen in years, WCCO-TV reported.

Police are having trouble keeping up as an unusual number of police have elected to leave the MPD or retire following their elected leadership’s call to gut the department.

WCCO interviewed residents of north Minneapolis, and they had a message for the City Council: Show yourself.

First-hand account of gun violence

Resident Liz Cruz told the station that just next door, bullets from a gunfight passed through the house, went through the dining room, and lodged the pantry, WCCO reported.

“Honestly, I haven’t really been sleeping right now, I mean, I can’t because I hear every little thing that is going on — police sirens, like the helicopters, the gun shooting, everything” Cruz said.

Cruz gave the station security camera footage from her home that recorded extensive gunfire on her street at night.

“You’re sleeping and all of a sudden you feel like you’re in a war zone,” she said. “I have four children, and I’ll sleep with them all in my room, because I am scared and I’m terrified that something is going to happen to them.”

Cruz added that she and her family and neighbors have to run inside even in the afternoon because of gunfire.

Where is the leadership?

“Nobody sees what we’ve living, nobody is feeling what we’re feeling, because they’re not here,” Cruz told WCCO

What she really wants to know is: Where is the city’s leadership?

“Help us, come and see what’s going on,” Cruz said.

“We’re really not getting any responses from the mayor or the City Council,” she added. “We feel kind of alone right now.”

Then she looked into the camera and delivered a heart-felt demand.

“Come here. Meet with us. Face us. Stay here for a weekend. For the love of God, just come here and say something to us — the people that are freaking voting for you and depend on you to take care of us!” Cruz pleaded. “Where are you? Show your face to us. Do something. Don’t just sit there and let your city go down to the ruins. Do something for us.”

Share
Categories
Defund the police Intelwars Minneapolis Minneapolis city council Police violent crime

After vowing to abolish police, Minneapolis City Council demands to know ‘Where are the police?’ as violence plagues the city

After the tragic death of George Floyd rocked the nation, the Minneapolis City Council — which is composed of nearly all Democrats — took the lead in the anti-police movement, voting to defund the city’s police department. The council sought to replace traditional law enforcement with newer community-based, alternative forms of policing.

But as violent crime has plagued the city for months, the city council is now asking: “Where are the police?”

What’s the background?

As TheBlaze reported, the Minneapolis City Council passed a resolution in June to replace the city’s police department with an alternative “community safety” model.

The development came days after the council promised anti-police residents that they would completely dismantle the city’s policing system.

What is happening now?

During a two-hour meeting with Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo this week, the Democratic city council, in brazen fashion, demanded to know why city police are not responding to the violence with enhanced law enforcement measures.

From Minnesota Public Radio:

The number of reported violent crimes, like assaults, robberies and homicides are up compared to 2019, according to MPD crime data. More people have been killed in the city in the first nine months of 2020 than were slain in all of last year. Property crimes, like burglaries and auto thefts, are also up. Incidents of arson have increased 55 percent over the total at this point in 2019.

“Residents are asking, ‘Where are the police?'” Councilman Jamal Osman said, MPR reported. “That is the only public safety option they have at the moment. MPD. They rely on MPD. And they are saying they are nowhere to be seen.”

Council President Lisa Bender, one of the loudest anti-police voices just months ago, claimed police are being “defiant,” according to MPR.

“This is not new,” she claimed.

Meanwhile, Phillipe Cunningham chided his colleagues for looking to the police for solutions when they called for the department’s abolition just a few months ago.

“What I am sort of flabbergasted by right now is colleagues, who a very short time ago were calling for abolition, are now suggesting we should be putting more resources and funding into MPD,” Cunningham said.

How was the response?

Arradondo told the council that he actually has taken measures to combat the spike in crime.

Arradondo explained that more officers have been added to patrols, additional resources have been allocated for investigative duties, and he has reiterated the seriousness of the crime issue with top department brass.

However, the department is also hemorrhaging personnel, Arradondo explained. In fact, more than 100 officers have left the department this year alone, more than double the usual number. With fewer officers, law enforcement becomes much more difficult.

Anything else?

As TheBlaze reported, momentum driving the push to disband the Minneapolis police department has dissipated because, as the Minneapolis City Council has learned, highly emotional rhetoric does not translate into functional policy.

“I think when you take a statement and then move into policy work, it gets more complicated,” Bender told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

Share
Categories
Community safety model Intelwars Minneapolis city council Police Replace

Minneapolis City Council passes resolution to replace police with ‘community safety’ model

The Minneapolis City Council voted unanimously to adopt a resolution officially committing to replace the city’s police department with a to-be-developed “community safety” model.

What are the details?

Earlier in the week, a veto-proof majority of council members pledged to activists that the Minneapolis Police Department would be dismantled in response to protests over the death of George Floyd in MPD custody.

On Friday, the entire council voted in a favor of a resolution “declaring the intent to create a transformative new model for cultivating safety” in the city to replace its police force.

The resolution calls for the formation of a working group tasked with developing “a set of preliminary recommendations for engaging with specific cultural and stakeholder groups, the community at large and relevant experts that can partner with the City to help Minneapolis transition to a transformative new model for cultivating community safety.”

It further declared that “the City Council will engage with every willing community member in Minneapolis, centering the voices of Black people, American Indian people, people of color, immigrants, victims of harm, and other stakeholders who have been historically marginalized or under-served by our present system.”

The working group will spend a year developing the plan, including “the potential creation of a new City Department of Community Safety.”

Anything else?

Reuters reported that “the movement to ‘defund the police,’ as some advocates have termed it, predates the current protests. It has won new support since a video of Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin pressing his knee to the neck of Floyd horrified viewers around the world.”

The council’s resolution notes, “George Floyd was not the first person killed by Minneapolis police, but joins a tragically long list of names including Tycel Nelson, Barbara Schneider, Fong Lee, David Cornelius Smith, Terrance Franklin, Jamar Clark, Justine Ruszczyk-Damond, Thurman Blevins, Travis Jordan, Chiasher Fong Vue, and others.”

Share
Categories
Defund police George floyd protests Intelwars Lara Logan Lisa bender Minneapolis city council minneapolis police Police

Journalist who was gang-raped trashes Minneapolis City Council president’s ‘privilege’ remarks

Journalist Lara Logan — who was sexually assaulted by a mob in Egypt in 2011 — slammed Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender for suggesting that concerns over criminals breaking into people’s homes come “from a place of privilege.”

Bender made the comments during an appearance on CNN Monday where she discussed the council’s pledge to “dismantle” the city’s police department and replace it with a “transformative new model of public safety” in response to George Floyd’s death late last month.

“I remember when I was being gang-raped & beaten by a mob in Egypt, would have been great to have a police force to call then,” Logan tweeted in response to Bender. “Would that have been my white privilege talking?”

“My heart breaks for every victim of racial injustice,” Logan added to the tweet thread. “And for every person, including police, killed by the mob of anarchists & their powerful political backers. How long before they come for me? No idea. But there is only one truth. That’s all we have.”

Logan was working as a CBS News correspondent in 2011 when the sexual assault occurred. She was covering the street celebrations in Tahrir Square after President Hosni Mubarak’s decision to step down when she was surrounded by a dangerous element of the crowd and separated from her team. She was then raped and beaten before being rescued by a group of women and Egyptian soldiers.

While many have criticized the growing movement to defund police in America, of which Bender is a figurehead, given her tragic past experiences, Logan’s outrage at the notion of a “police-free world” is especially powerful.

Yet despite opposition from many, including Democratic Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey and presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, the council appears resolute in its mission to disband the city’s police.

(H/T: The Daily Wire)

Share
Categories
Defund the police George floyd protests Intelwars Minneapolis city council minneapolis police Minneapolis protests

Minneapolis City Council president says if you are concerned about not having any police, that ‘comes from a place of privilege’

Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender is standing by the council’s plan to disband the local police department, and she responded to people who might be concerned about not having police to call if someone breaks into their house by saying that their concerns came “from a place of privilege.”

On Monday, Bender spoke with Alisyn Camerota on CNN’s “New Day,” where she said that she’s wholly able to envision a future for the city sans police department.

Last week, Bender said she would lead the fight to defund and dismantle the police force following the police killing of George Floyd.

What are the details?

Speaking to Camerota about the controversial pledge to entirely dismantle the police force, Bender said that she had a grand vision for a reduction in police force back in 2016 when she and other lawmakers were running for office.

“A lot of us were asked if we could imagine a future without police back in 2017 when we were running for office,” Bender said. “And I answered ‘yes’ to that question.”

Bender added that she’s aware that disbanding the police force will come with problems of its own.

“I know that [concerns over having no law enforcement] comes from a place of privilege,” she insisted. “For those of us for whom the system is working, I think we need to step back and imagine what it would feel like to already live in that reality where calling the police may mean more harm is done.”

On Sunday, the Minneapolis City Council vowed to shut down the city’s police department. Nine of the council’s 13 members pledged to begin dismantling the local police department as it exists.

Councilwoman Alondra Cano said that the councilmembers’ unity “signals a strong and clear direction about where this is going.”

In a statement, members of the council said, “Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed and will never be accountable for its actions. We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new, transformative model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.”

The council did not detail what type of law enforcement would take the place of its existing law enforcement.


Minneapolis City Council President: I Can Imagine a Police-Free Future

www.youtube.com

Share
Categories
Defund the police George floyd protests Intelwars Minneapolis city council minneapolis police Minneapolis protests

Minneapolis City Council president says if you are concerned about not having any police, that ‘comes from a place of privilege’

Minneapolis City Council President Lisa Bender is standing by the council’s plan to disband the local police department, and she responded to people who might be concerned about not having police to call if someone breaks into their house by saying that their concerns came “from a place of privilege.”

On Monday, Bender spoke with Alisyn Camerota on CNN’s “New Day,” where she said that she’s wholly able to envision a future for the city sans police department.

Last week, Bender said she would lead the fight to defund and dismantle the police force following the police killing of George Floyd.

What are the details?

Speaking to Camerota about the controversial pledge to entirely dismantle the police force, Bender said that she had a grand vision for a reduction in police force back in 2016 when she and other lawmakers were running for office.

“A lot of us were asked if we could imagine a future without police back in 2017 when we were running for office,” Bender said. “And I answered ‘yes’ to that question.”

Bender added that she’s aware that disbanding the police force will come with problems of its own.

“I know that [concerns over having no law enforcement] comes from a place of privilege,” she insisted. “For those of us for whom the system is working, I think we need to step back and imagine what it would feel like to already live in that reality where calling the police may mean more harm is done.”

On Sunday, the Minneapolis City Council vowed to shut down the city’s police department. Nine of the council’s 13 members pledged to begin dismantling the local police department as it exists.

Councilwoman Alondra Cano said that the councilmembers’ unity “signals a strong and clear direction about where this is going.”

In a statement, members of the council said, “Decades of police reform efforts have proved that the Minneapolis Police Department cannot be reformed and will never be accountable for its actions. We are here today to begin the process of ending the Minneapolis Police Department and creating a new, transformative model for cultivating safety in Minneapolis.”

The council did not detail what type of law enforcement would take the place of its existing law enforcement.


Minneapolis City Council President: I Can Imagine a Police-Free Future

www.youtube.com

Share