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Dr. anthony fauci Fire fauci Fired act House of Representatives House Republicans Intelwars Us congress Warren davison

House Republicans introduce bill to fire Dr. Fauci

House Republicans introduced a bill Wednesday to set term limits on appointees to direct the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which would effectively fire top White House chief medical adviser Dr. Anthony Fauci.

The bill, titled the “Fauci’s Incompetence Requires Early Dismissal (FIRED) Act, was introduced by Rep. Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) and co-sponsored by several House conservatives including Reps. Chip Roy (R-Texas), Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.), and Ralph Norman (R-S.C.). It would set a retroactive 12-year term limit on the NIAID director, a position held by Fauci since 1984.

Should it become law, Fauci would be forced to leave his job.

“In the wake of massive missteps by Dr. Fauci and his subordinates in the handling of the coronavirus pandemic, this bill addresses an oft-overlooked issue: The lack of accountability for unelected bureaucrats,” a press statement from Davidson’s office reads.

“Under Dr. Fauci’s guidance, Americans have lost confidence in the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control, leading to confusion and serious government overreach that has threatened Americans’ livelihoods and freedoms. Despite successful treatment therapies, a historic vaccination development, and decreasing cases, Dr. Fauci has continued to advise healthy, low-risk Americans to continue to act as if the pandemic were out of control — after overseeing nearly a year of draconian public health policies that have decimated the U.S. economy,” the statement said.

“Dr. Fauci represents everything that President Eisenhower warned us about in his farewell address: The scientific-technical elite steering the country toward their own ends,” Davison said. “Americans have had decades of Dr. Fauci’s leadership, and he publicly failed to respond appropriately to the COVID-19 pandemic. It is time for him to step aside so that new leadership can ‘follow the science’ and start reopening America.'”

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The bill has no chance of becoming law with Democrats in control of Congress and President Joe Biden in the White House, but it does reflect growing frustrations among Republicans with Fauci and other Biden administration health officials.

On Tuesday, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) clashed with Fauci during a hearing on the pandemic response over NIH funding for research conducted at the Wuhan Institute of Virology — the Chinese lab that some suspect may have contributed to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Paul accused Fauci of supporting risky “gain of function research,” which involves manipulating naturally occurring viral diseases to be able to infect humans and studying how they might evolve.

Fauci denied that NIH ever funded the risky research, which some warn could cause a pandemic if an artificial virus is leaked or deliberately released to the public.

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Chip Roy calls on House Republicans to reject Stefanik as successor to Cheney, citing her liberal voting record

Ahead of a vote to oust Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.) from House Republican leadership, a member of the conservative House Freedom Caucus sent a memo to every GOP office decrying her presumptive successor, Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.), as a Democrat in Republican clothing.

Rep. Chip Roy (R-Texas) circulated a memo Tuesday asking the House Republican conference to reconsider elevating Stefanik to the role of conference chairwoman, a position responsible for messaging ahead of the 2022 midterm election. Citing her voting record, which was often contrary to the agenda of former President Donald Trump, Roy called on House Republicans to “choose someone who reflects our conservative values” to succeed Cheney.

“We must avoid putting in charge Republicans who campaign as Republicans but then vote for and advance the Democrats’ agenda once sworn in,” Roy wrote to his colleagues.

“Therefore, with all due respect to my friend, Elise Stefanik, let us contemplate the message Republican leadership is about to send by rushing to coronate a spokesperson whose voting record embodies much of what led to the 2018 ass-kicking we received by Democrats,” he said.

On Monday, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) said that the secret ballot vote to oust Cheney from leadership will happen Wednesday. Cheney has fallen out of favor with McCarthy and the rest of the Republican conference for her outspoken criticism of Trump — in news conferences, media interviews, and op-eds — which they feel is a distraction from their efforts to craft a message to win back control of the House of Representatives in the next election.

Cheney was one of 10 House Republicans to vote in favor of impeaching President Trump after the Jan. 6 violence at the U.S. Capitol building. She holds Trump responsible for inciting the violence with his statements contesting the results of the 2020 presidential election and has called on other Republicans to reject the former president’s claims.

Trump himself, McCarthy, and GOP Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) have each endorsed Stefanik, a vocal Trump supporter, to succeed Cheney. But some Republicans and conservative activists have voiced opposition to Stefanik, citing her liberal voting record.

“Elise Stefanik is NOT a good spokesperson for the House Republican Conference,” said the Club for Growth, a conservative grassroots organization. “She is a liberal with a 35% CFGF lifetime rating, 4th worst in the House GOP. House Republicans should find a conservative to lead messaging and win back the House Majority.”

Roy’s memo to House Republicans highlighted several of Stefanik’s votes that put her in opposition to conservatives, including a vote against Trump’s 2017 tax cuts; a vote to override Trump’s funding of the border wall; a vote for the Equality Act; and “many other concerning votes and positions.”

“The forgotten men and women of this country simply want us to stand up for them. Please tell me how we are sending a message today that we are standing up for them with a leadership-tapped colleague with that record as our spokesperson?” Roy wrote.

He warned Republicans that straying from Trump’s America First Agenda is what cost them the House in 2018 and what might prevent them from winning it back in 2022.

He also demanded that Republicans “be clear that the media narrative” about why Cheney is being forced from leadership “is false.”

“This is about her general failure to lead the conference — recognizing that real concerns with expanded mail-in ballots, lack of identification requirements, ballot harvesting, and the numerous ways to undermine elections — on a path forward to restore election integrity. This is the kind of unified “election” message that Liz unfortunately did not develop that we should embrace now.”

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Reports: House Republicans confident Liz Cheney will be ousted from leadership, discussing her replacement

House Republicans are inching closer to forcing House GOP Conference Chairman Liz Cheney (Wyo.) from her leadership position, with some so confident she will be removed that several congresswomen are being discussed to replace her, according to multiple reports.

“Liz is gone. Just a question of how and when,” one Republican lawmaker told CNN on condition of anonymity.

Among those being discussed to succeed Cheney as the No. 3 Republican in the House are Reps. Elise Stefanik (R-N.Y.), Ann Wagner (R-Mo.), Jackie Walorski (R-Ind.), and Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash.), Axios reported Tuesday.

Tensions are running high in the GOP conference as several lawmakers are fed up with Cheney’s vocal criticism of former President Donald Trump, believing her to be a “liability” who is taking Republicans off-message ahead of the 2022 midterm elections.

Recently, Cheney told the New York Post that “the senators who led the unconstitutional charge” to challenge the Electoral College results on Jan. 6 had committed a “disqualifying” offense and should be left out of consideration for the 2024 presidential nomination. She made those remarks at a policy retreat in Florida, where House Republicans had intended to gather to discuss strategy and develop a cohesive and unified message to bring to the American people.

This week, she accused the former president of “poisoning our democratic system” by continuing to insist the results of the 2020 presidential election were illegitimate, calling Trump’s claims that the election was stolen “THE BIG LIE.”

Cheney’s repeated insistence that the party must move on from Trump has put her in conflict with other lawmakers who recognize the party base is still firmly in Trump’s corner and fear alienating Trump’s supporters could keep them from winning congressional majorities in 2022.

In the strongest sign yet that Cheney’s future in leadership is in doubt, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) acknowledged Tuesday that her “ability to carry out the job as conference chair” has become a concern among several members of the GOP caucus.

“I have heard from members concerned about her ability to carry out the job as conference chair, to carry out the message,” McCarthy said on “Fox & Friends.” “We all need to be working as one if we’re able to win the majority. Remember, majorities are not given, they are earned. And that’s about the message about going forward.”

In response, a spokesman for Cheney released a statement, saying: “This is about whether the Republican Party is going to perpetuate lies about the 2020 election and attempt to whitewash what happened on Jan 6. Liz will not do that. That is the issue.”

Previously, McCarthy had defended Cheney from an attempt by some conservative lawmakers to force her out of leadership in retribution for her vote to impeach former President Donald Trump. But as Cheney has continued to attack the former president and her relationship with McCarthy has frayed, the GOP leader’s allies have begun hinting to the media that her time in leadership will be over before the month’s end.

As for who could replace Cheney in leadership, both Axios and Punchbowl News have reported there is a “consensus” opinion that a woman must succeed Cheney if she is tossed out.

In response to those reports, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) issued a statement mocking Republicans for seeking a “non-threatening female” to serve under McCarthy and Minority Whip Rep. Steve Scalise (R-La.).

“Word is out that House GOP Leaders are looking to push Rep. Liz Cheney from her post as House Republican Conference Chair – their most senior woman in GOP leadership – for a litany of very Republican reasons: she won’t lie, she isn’t humble enough, she’s like a girlfriend rooting for the wrong team, and more,” Pelosi’s office said.

The House Republican conference will meet Wednesday, May 12. It would take a two-thirds vote by secret ballot to remove Cheney from leadership.

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House Republicans introduce bill to defund UN Population Fund

A group of 40 House Republicans, led by Rep. Chip Roy (Texas), have introduced a bill to defund the United Nations Population Fund, arguing the international body supports China’s tyrannical population controls, including forced abortions and forced sterilization of women.

The “No Taxpayer Funding for the United Nations Population Fund Act” would prevent U.S. taxpayer dollars from being spent to support UNFPA, which supports “global population and reproductive health.” The Republicans supporting this bill claim UNFPA is “openly complicit in China’s inhumane two-child policy and publicly praises China’s abusive population-control programs which included as forced abortions and the forced sterilization of women,” according to a press statement from Roy’s office.

National Review was the first to report that the bill’s text would stipulate “no funds available to the Department of State or any other department or agency may be used to provide contributions directly or indirectly to the United Nations Population Fund.”

In 2017, President Donald Trump cut $32.5 million from UNFPA after reinstating the “Mexico City policy,” which bars U.S. foreign aid to nongovernmental organizations that fund or otherwise support organizations that provide abortions. But President Joe Biden on his first day in office revoked the Mexico City policy and in his FY 2022 budget request to Congress the president is calling for restoring funding to the UN Population Fund.

“American tax dollars should never directly or indirectly support taking of innocent human life through abortion or the dehumanizing act of involuntary sterilization, and they certainly shouldn’t be used to support the oppressive, America-hating Chinese Communist Party in any way whatsoever,” Roy said. “Former President Trump was right to stop funding the UN Population Fund due to their open partnership with the oppressive Chinese regime and their support for China’s atrocious human rights violations. This legislation will continue that policy.”

The GOP bill is backed by pro-life groups including the Susan B. Anthony List and March for Life Action.

“We strongly support the No Taxpayer Funding for the U.N. Population Fund (UNFPA) Act and thank Congressman Chip Roy for his leadership,” Susan B. Anthony List said in a statement. “The UNFPA has long been complicit in the Chinese government’s coercive birth limitation policies, including forced abortions. Polling from this year shows that a strong majority of Americans don’t want their taxpayer dollars funding abortion overseas. This legislation is urgently needed to disentangle American taxpayers from such egregious violations of human rights.”

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House Republicans vote in secret to bring back pork-barrel spending

House Republicans voted Wednesday to end their conference-wide ban on earmarks, restoring GOP support for pork-barrel spending that directs money to pet projects in home districts.

The resolution was passed during the GOP’s weekly conference meeting. The vote was 102-84 in favor of restoring earmarks and was conducted by secret ballot, so voters will not know which Republicans voted to bring back pork spending.

In 2010, House Republicans passed a moratorium on earmarks in their conference by voice vote, to show they were serious about cutting spending ahead of the midterm elections that year. Controversies like the wasteful $400 million “bridge to nowhere” in Alaska fueled Republican campaign promises decrying federal spending and promising reform.

After the 2010 Tea Party wave election handed the GOP control of the House and made Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio) House speaker, Republicans pledged to hold a vote banning earmarks.

“Earmarks have become a symbol of a dysfunctional Congress and serve as a fuel line for the culture of spending that has dominated Washington for too long,” GOP leaders said at the time.

But in recent years, earmark proponents have argued that the ban was a mistake and that the ability of legislators to trade their support for certain bills in exchange for earmarks in those bills is needed to move legislation through Congress.

With President Joe Biden advocating for big-budget items like a multi-trillion-dollar infrastructure bill, Republicans say they want more control over how that money is spent.

“”There’s a real concern about the administration directing where money goes. This doesn’t add one more dollar. I think members here know … about what should go in their district, not Biden,” Republican House Leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters ahead of the conference vote.

Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) offered the resolution to end the GOP’s self-imposed earmark ban. His proposal included several rules to increase transparency, including requirements for GOP lawmakers to publicly disclose the earmark, provide written justification for any project, and verify that they have no financial stake in it.

“I’m a yes,” Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) said. “With the changes with transparency — it’s not the Upton Road to the Upton House, you have support in writing from local units of government — I think that’s a fair approach.”

Members of the House Freedom Caucus blasted their colleagues for supporting the return of pork spending, equating it to “legislative bribery.”

“I think we’ve got $30 trillion in debt and people are tired of the swamp, and the GOP should be ashamed of itself, if it jumps headfirst right back into the swamp,” Rep. Chip Roy (R-Texas) said.

Senate Republicans are considering a similar measure to restore earmarks, which is supported by retiring Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.)

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Debt and deficit Earmark ban Earmarks government spending House Republicans Intelwars Pork-barrel spending us house of representatives

House Republicans vote in secret to bring back pork-barrel spending

House Republicans voted Wednesday to end their conference-wide ban on earmarks, restoring GOP support for pork-barrel spending that directs money to pet projects in home districts.

The resolution was passed during the GOP’s weekly conference meeting. The vote was 102-84 in favor of restoring earmarks and was conducted by secret ballot, so voters will not know which Republicans voted to bring back pork spending.

In 2010, House Republicans passed a moratorium on earmarks in their conference by voice vote, to show they were serious about cutting spending ahead of the midterm elections that year. Controversies like the wasteful $400 million “bridge to nowhere” in Alaska fueled Republican campaign promises decrying federal spending and promising reform.

After the 2010 Tea Party wave election handed the GOP control of the House and made Rep. John Boehner (R-Ohio) House speaker, Republicans pledged to hold a vote banning earmarks.

“Earmarks have become a symbol of a dysfunctional Congress and serve as a fuel line for the culture of spending that has dominated Washington for too long,” GOP leaders said at the time.

But in recent years, earmark proponents have argued that the ban was a mistake and that the ability of legislators to trade their support for certain bills in exchange for earmarks in those bills is needed to move legislation through Congress.

With President Joe Biden advocating for big-budget items like a multi-trillion-dollar infrastructure bill, Republicans say they want more control over how that money is spent.

“”There’s a real concern about the administration directing where money goes. This doesn’t add one more dollar. I think members here know … about what should go in their district, not Biden,” Republican House Leader Kevin McCarthy told reporters ahead of the conference vote.

Rep. Mike Rogers (R-Ala.) offered the resolution to end the GOP’s self-imposed earmark ban. His proposal included several rules to increase transparency, including requirements for GOP lawmakers to publicly disclose the earmark, provide written justification for any project, and verify that they have no financial stake in it.

“I’m a yes,” Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.) said. “With the changes with transparency — it’s not the Upton Road to the Upton House, you have support in writing from local units of government — I think that’s a fair approach.”

Members of the House Freedom Caucus blasted their colleagues for supporting the return of pork spending, equating it to “legislative bribery.”

“I think we’ve got $30 trillion in debt and people are tired of the swamp, and the GOP should be ashamed of itself, if it jumps headfirst right back into the swamp,” Rep. Chip Roy (R-Texas) said.

Senate Republicans are considering a similar measure to restore earmarks, which is supported by retiring Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.)

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Watch: ‘Awkward’ moment House GOP leaders take opposite stances on Trump at presser

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and Republican Conference Chairwoman Liz Cheney (Wyo.) are not on the same page when it comes to former President Donald Trump, as evidenced by them taking opposite stances at the end of a press conference several outlets have described as “awkward.”

What are the details?

McCarthy did not hesitate when asked whether Trump should be speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference this weekend, replying definitively, “Yes he should.”

When asked for her own response to the question, Cheney, the No. 3 GOP House leader replied, “That’s up to CPAC.”

“I’ve been clear on my views about President Trump,” Cheney continued. “I don’t believe that he should be playing a role in the future of the party or the country.”

As Cheney replied, No. 2 GOP House leader Steve Scalise (La.), could be seen shaking his head.

A brief silence ensued, before McCarthy joked, “On that high note, thank you all very much,” ending the presser.


Watch: GOP’s McCarthy And Cheney Disagree At Press Conference Over Trump At CPAC | NBC News NOW

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McCarthy has remained a loyal defender of President Trump in the aftermath of the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, which Democrats — and some Republicans, including Cheney — hold the former president responsible for inciting.

But McCarthy has also remained a loyal defender of Cheney, pushing back against fellow Republicans’ calls for her to be removed from leadership after she voted to impeach Trump along with a handful of other GOP House members.

Cheney survived a vote threatening to boot her leadership following her vote, and has dismissed censure from her state party as well as calls for her to resign her seat entirely in the aftermath.

Cheney stays firm on Trump

Meanwhile, Cheney has held her ground on her position that Trump should have no part in the GOP moving forward.

On Tuesday, the Wyoming congresswoman took aim at Trump during an interview with the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation & Institute, saying:

“[It’s] incumbent upon everybody who takes an oath of office and swears to protect and defend the Constitution that we recognize what happened on Jan. 6, that we commit ourselves that it must never happen again, that we recognize the damage that was done by the president, President Trump, saying that somehow the election was stolen, making those claims for months and summoning the mob and provoking them then in the attack on the Capitol. And also, and very importantly, in refusing, despite multiple requests from people to ask him to stop what was happening to ask him to stop the violence to protect the Capitol to protect the counting of electoral votes — he didn’t do so.”

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Chinese spy Christine fang Eric Swalwell House Intelligence Committee House Republicans Intelwars Liz Cheney Nancy Pelosi Steve Scalise

Top Republicans demand Eric Swalwell lose House Intel Committee position over Chinese spy relationship

More than a dozen House Republicans sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) Tuesday demanding Rep. Eric Swalwell’s removal from the House Intelligence Committee.

News broke last week that Swalwell, a California Democrat, had developed a close relationship with a Chinese spy operating in the San Francisco area named Christine Fang.

They were so close, in fact, that in 2015, “amid a widening counterintelligence probe, federal investigators became so alarmed by Fang’s behavior and activities that … they alerted Swalwell to their concerns — giving him what is known as a defensive briefing,” Axios reported.

The report noted that Swalwell then severed ties with Fang. However, concerns over whether Swalwell was compromised surfaced because Fang, as Axios noted, became so close to some American politicians that she engaged in “romantic or sexual relationships with at least two Midwestern mayors.”

What did the letter say?

Swalwell’s relationship with Fang constitutes an “unacceptable national security risk,” the 17 House Republicans wrote to Pelosi.

They said:

We write to you today out of concern with Congressman Eric Swalwell’s reported, close
contacts with a Chinese Communist Party spy recently reported by Axios. Because of Rep.
Swalwell’s position on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, his close
interactions with Chinese intelligence services, however unintentional they may be, are an
unacceptable national security risk. HPSCI handles some of the most sensitive information our
government possesses — information critical to our national defense. As such, we urge you
to immediately remove Rep. Swalwell from his position on the House Intelligence
Committee.

The lawmakers pointed toward Pelosi’s own words as precedent for Swalwell’s removal.

During the height of the Trump-Russia conspiracy theory in 2017, Pelosi said then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions was “not fit to serve…and must resign” for not disclosing two meetings with then-Russian Ambassador Sergei Kislyak. Sessions, of course, eventually recused himself from the Trump-Russia investigation over the two meetings.

Swalwell also did not disclose his relationship with the Chinese spy, which means he, too, should resign if Pelosi administers her standard consistently.

“Rep. Swalwell withheld information for five years from the House Intelligence Committee about an ongoing Chinese espionage operation targeted at him and his own colleagues,” the Republicans wrote. “Obviously, Rep. Swalwell’s interactions with a Chinese spy were more dangerous and unusual than AG Session’s meetings with a Russian diplomat.”

“But to make matters worse, Rep. Swalwell kept this information to himself while repeatedly using his position on HPSCI to peddle damaging and baseless conspiracies about President Donald Trump’s unproven ties to Russia for years and still refuses to comment fully on the extent and nature of his relationship with the Chinese Communist Party spy exposed in Axios’ bombshell report,” the letter continued.

The letter was signed by House Minority Whip Steve Scalise (R-La.) and Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the second-highest and third-highest ranking House Republicans.

How has Swalwell responded?

Swalwell responded by blaming President Donald Trump.

“I’ve been a critic of the president. I’ve spoken out against him. I was on both committees that worked to impeach him,” Swalwell said last Tuesday. “The timing feels like that should be looked at.”

“What it appears though that this person — as the story reports — was unsuccessful in whatever they were trying to do,” he added. “But if intelligence officials are trying to weaponize someone’s cooperation, they are essentially seeking to do what this person was not able to do, which is to try and discredit someone.”‘

For her part, Pelosi told reporters last week, “I don’t have any concern about Mr. Swalwell.”

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House Republicans demand Kennedy Center face questions or return the money after laying off employees amid the taxpayer bailout

Republicans on the House Oversight Committee are demanding answers from management at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts after they decided to furlough employees immediately after receiving a $25 million taxpayer bailout as part of the CARES Act last week.

Democrats fought to include money for the performing arts center in the coronavirus stimulus package last week, in a move that became even more controversial after the Kennedy Center abruptly laid off its entire orchestra just hours after receiving the money.

In a letter Tuesday to the center’s director, Timothy O’Leary, Republican lawmakers insisted that Kennedy Center management provide them with a briefing on their decision to lay off and furlough employees and explain how they are currently using the stimulus money. The lawmakers also demanded that the center return a portion of the money.

“If the Kennedy Center is required to furlough its employees, it should return a portion of money Democrats fought so hard to secure,” the letter stated.

The GOP lawmakers also claimed that the Kennedy Center’s actions proved “public skepticism” over the allocation of funding to the arts centers while small businesses around the country struggled to stay afloat was “well-founded.”

“The public’s perception is that the Kennedy Center leadership took taxpayer funding and left their employees holding the bag,” Rep. Bob Gibbs (R-Ohio) said in a statement, according to Fox News. “Congress, and more importantly the public, deserves answers to the questionable decisions made to furlough employees after receiving funding to prevent that.”

The letter came just a week after two GOP congressmen introduced a bill to rescind the stimulus funds.

After news broke to conservative ire that the arts center was to receive taxpayer money, the Kennedy Center responded defending the windfall — only to be eviscerated on Twitter.

“The ability to deliver on our mandated mission is at risk,” the center said in a statement. “As a result, federal relief funding is the only way we will be in a position to reopen the nation’s cultural center when our government officials tell us it is safe to do so.”

“The Kennedy Center is no more deserving of money than any other theater that is about to go under,” David Harsanyi of National Review wrote.

Former Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley asked, “How many more people could have been helped with this money?”

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