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Brace For Cold: Water, Cell,& Power Outages In Texas

Texas has been ravaged by a freezing storm. On Sunday night, while the storm raged on, the power grid took a beating leading to rolling blackouts across the state for around 4.3 million residents. As the power outages continue, they have set off a cascade of other problems, knocking some water treatment plants and cell phone networks offline.

Winter storms are just one more reason to prepare.  Normally Texans don’t have to deal with storms of this magnitude as far south as they are, but there are always acceptions.

Officials in Abilene said the city has lost water service altogether, leaving 124,000 residents entirely without a reliable source of drinking water as of Monday night, according to a report by RT. 

What To Do NOW To Prep For A Winter Power Outage

People at the Austin Fire Department are battling with the element that is usually on their side when they deal with blazes. Water pipes have been bursting by the hundreds throughout the city as it was gripped by extreme cold. Responding to them was a challenge since the AFD have their plate full with other emergencies, RT reported further. 

The situation is quickly becoming dire for the many who have ailed to adequately prepare for a storm and the loss of the grid.

Governor Greg Abbott has been taking a lot of flak from Texans who are unhappy with how he has dealt with this crisis. He deployed the National Guard and allocated other resources to deal with the power outages, but people say the troops can’t help them make their homes warm again.  Deploying the military when people need heat in their homes is about the most useless thing a politician has done since they shut down the economy in March of last year.

If you can help please do so.  People in Texas are struggling and the solution seems to be to call in the military. Welcome to 2021.  This is our dystopia.  But we have a chance to prove we don’t need these tyrants by helping each other and doing the right thing.

The post Brace For Cold: Water, Cell,& Power Outages In Texas first appeared on SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don’t Say We Didn’t Warn You.

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Million New Yorkers Can’t Afford Food As Hunger Crisis Worsens

This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge. 

In the seventh month of the virus pandemic, New York City is still in shambles, with more than half a million residents unemployed as the small business collapse continues. Broadway is closed, Manhattan offices are empty as remote work dominates, violent crime is surging, and an exodus of people from the city has created a perfect storm of economic chaos that will hunt many New Yorkers for years.

A byproduct of the virus-induced economic downturn is food and housing insecurity for millions of people in the Tri-state area. Deep economic scarring produced by permanent job loss has left many people in a bind; some working-poor may never recover while others could take years.

Food and housing insecurity will be, or should be, a hot subject as millions in the Tri-state area are suffering ahead of the holidays. Readers may recall in early October, the Community FoodBank of New Jersey warned that more than one million New Jerseyans were expected to suffer food insecurity by the end of the year.

Now the problem is becoming more widespread. At least one million New Yorkers are expected, or will soon, experience food insecurity, according to FOX 5 NY.

Alexander Rapaport, the executive director of Masbia soup kitchen network, said, “We have done disasters before, but nothing is even close to what we are doing now,” referring to the long lines at food banks across the city is all too common.

Masbia is a nonprofit soup kitchen network and food pantry, with Borough Park and Flatbush locations in Brooklyn and Forest Hills in Queens. Rapaport said there had been a 500% increase in demand.

In a separate report, NYT estimates the number of New Yorkers who are going hungry could be upwards of 1.5 million.

Denise Allen, a mother who visits one of Masbia’s food banks, said:

“I’m on a limited income. I visit every two to three weeks,” said Allen.

Rapaport said, “there is so much need. So much so that for the last three days, Rapaport, his staff, and volunteers have been operating around the clock. All three locations are now open 24/7, feeding 1,500 families a day, but it is still not enough.”

With demand high for food banks in the city, he said long lines have developed, which forced him to create an entirely new system in what he calls digital food bank lines.

“You now have to make an appointment to pick up your box of food,” Rapaport said.

Meanwhile, it’s not just the Tri-state area that is in economic distress, with millions going hungry while others are at risk of eviction; Feeding America, one of the nation’s top food banks, recently warned that it may run out of food in the next twelve months as demand has overwhelmed its network.

Food and housing insecurity for millions of people across the country signals the transmission mechanism of stimulus, if that was through fiscal or monetary, has failed to support the working poor.

*EDITOR’S NOTE: If you haven’t prepared for the upcoming food shortage, please do now! Time is running out. People can still get food from the food banks and buy it at grocery stores.  That will end, and when it does, the food riots will be intense! It isn’t just food either. There is a combustible combination of several things that could ignite at any second. Please stay prepped and alert. 

The post Million New Yorkers Can’t Afford Food As Hunger Crisis Worsens first appeared on SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don't Say We Didn't Warn You.

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boxes of food disasters Economic Downturn emergency food banks food shortagges Headline News help Intelwars Long lines manhattan New Jersey New York City permanent job loss poor POVERTY Prepare soup kitchen

Million New Yorkers Can’t Afford Food As Hunger Crisis Worsens

This article was originally published by Tyler Durden at ZeroHedge. 

In the seventh month of the virus pandemic, New York City is still in shambles, with more than half a million residents unemployed as the small business collapse continues. Broadway is closed, Manhattan offices are empty as remote work dominates, violent crime is surging, and an exodus of people from the city has created a perfect storm of economic chaos that will hunt many New Yorkers for years.

A byproduct of the virus-induced economic downturn is food and housing insecurity for millions of people in the Tri-state area. Deep economic scarring produced by permanent job loss has left many people in a bind; some working-poor may never recover while others could take years.

Food and housing insecurity will be, or should be, a hot subject as millions in the Tri-state area are suffering ahead of the holidays. Readers may recall in early October, the Community FoodBank of New Jersey warned that more than one million New Jerseyans were expected to suffer food insecurity by the end of the year.

Now the problem is becoming more widespread. At least one million New Yorkers are expected, or will soon, experience food insecurity, according to FOX 5 NY.

Alexander Rapaport, the executive director of Masbia soup kitchen network, said, “We have done disasters before, but nothing is even close to what we are doing now,” referring to the long lines at food banks across the city is all too common.

Masbia is a nonprofit soup kitchen network and food pantry, with Borough Park and Flatbush locations in Brooklyn and Forest Hills in Queens. Rapaport said there had been a 500% increase in demand.

In a separate report, NYT estimates the number of New Yorkers who are going hungry could be upwards of 1.5 million.

Denise Allen, a mother who visits one of Masbia’s food banks, said:

“I’m on a limited income. I visit every two to three weeks,” said Allen.

Rapaport said, “there is so much need. So much so that for the last three days, Rapaport, his staff, and volunteers have been operating around the clock. All three locations are now open 24/7, feeding 1,500 families a day, but it is still not enough.”

With demand high for food banks in the city, he said long lines have developed, which forced him to create an entirely new system in what he calls digital food bank lines.

“You now have to make an appointment to pick up your box of food,” Rapaport said.

Meanwhile, it’s not just the Tri-state area that is in economic distress, with millions going hungry while others are at risk of eviction; Feeding America, one of the nation’s top food banks, recently warned that it may run out of food in the next twelve months as demand has overwhelmed its network.

Food and housing insecurity for millions of people across the country signals the transmission mechanism of stimulus, if that was through fiscal or monetary, has failed to support the working poor.

*EDITOR’S NOTE: If you haven’t prepared for the upcoming food shortage, please do now! Time is running out. People can still get food from the food banks and buy it at grocery stores.  That will end, and when it does, the food riots will be intense! It isn’t just food either. There is a combustible combination of several things that could ignite at any second. Please stay prepped and alert. 

The post Million New Yorkers Can’t Afford Food As Hunger Crisis Worsens first appeared on SHTF Plan – When It Hits The Fan, Don't Say We Didn't Warn You.

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‘I sought help when I needed it’: Top U.S. general delivers personal message on suicide awareness

One of the most powerful men in the United States Armed Forces revealed part of his own personal story in a message this week addressing suicide among America’s men and women in uniform.

What are the details?

Air Force general and Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff John Hyten delivered a statement shared by The Joint Staff on Twitter Tuesday directed toward “service members and leaders on the importance of seeking help and being there for your people.”

The decorated general — who previously served as commander of Air Force Space Command — explained that armed forces leadership is working “relentlessly to better connect” with servicemembers’ loved ones and resources to prevent suicide among military personnel.

“To do this, we need to start with our chain of command,” Hyten said, acknowledging, “I sought help when I needed it.”

He explained, “When I was commander of U.S. Strategic Command, I felt like I needed to get some help. I felt like I needed to talk to somebody. So, I got an appointment with a psychiatrist, and I was kindly offered an anonymous, backdoor entry and I rejected it.”

“If I’d had the flu, I’d walk through the front door to see the doctor,” he continued. “This was no different.”

Hyten added, “Our mental and physical health are equally as important and they’re the same thing. I got the help I needed and I’m stronger for it. So don’t hesitate to get professional help. There are no negative consequences to your career, and only positive results for you personally. For your family, and your friends.”

His message was shared by Chief of the National Guard Bureau Gen. Daniel Hokanson, who tweeted, “If Gen. John Hyten, vice chair of the Joint Chiefs, can have the courage to reach out for help, when he felt he needed it, without fear of consequences, then so can the rest of us.”

September is Suicide Prevention Month, and Thursday is Suicide Awareness Day. Both come amid continued shutdowns spurred by COVID-19, which have exacerbated mental strains and suicidal thoughts —
particularly among America’s young adults.

But suicide rates among veterans has been a concern long before the coronavirus emerged. Nearly a year ago, the Military Times reported that “In the last four years, the official government estimate on the number of veterans who die by suicide has gone from 22 a day to 17 a day in the latest Veterans Affairs report.”

The outlet noted, “Veterans are 1.5 times more likely to die by suicide than Americans who never served in the military. For female veterans, the risk factor is 2.2 times more likely.”

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