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Blm protest demands Defund the police Defund the police seattle Intelwars Jenny durkan veto Seattle Seattle city council socialist Seattle police dept cut

Seattle City Council overrides mayor’s veto to defund the police; up to 100 officers to be cut

The Seattle City Council voted to override Mayor Jenny Durkan’s three vetos of bills to divert funds from the police department into social programs.

The council voted 7-2 in a vote on Tuesday after three hours of discussion that included the consideration of a compromise bill that was ultimately rejected.

Durkan vetoed the police budget bill in August but said in
statement that she did so because the city council had not consulted with her office to arrive at a defunding bill they could agree on.

“This veto was because the bills as passed did not have the type of collaboration that I think we will have going forward, and that I’m hopeful we will have going forward,” she said at the time.

The proposal cuts about $3.4 million from the department’s $400 million budget. Seattle has about 1,400 police officers and the bill would cause 100 police positions to be cut by attrition.

The cut to the police department’s funding falls far short of the demands from Black Lives Matter protesters, who have called for 50% of the funds to be diverted to social programs.

Kshama Sawant, the far left socialist member of the city council, had voted against the bill because it didn’t go far enough to meet the demands of the BLM protesters.

“Seattle Mayor Durkan remains hostile to defunding police,” said Sawant in a tweet. “Democratic Councilmembers completely failed to keep their public promises of 50% defunding in the Summer budget vote, furthermore, approved an austerity budget after having promised anti-austerity.”

The previous vote of the city council to cut police funding also led to the resignation of former Police Chief Carmen Best, who said she felt as if the measures were motivated by “animus toward me specifically.”

While many supporters of the protester praised the modest cuts to the police department, some like local conservative talk show host Jason Rantz condemned the move.

“Seattle City Council voted to override the Mayor’s veto of their dangerous defund police bill,” tweeted Rantz.

“This Council will *always* side with socialists and criminal activists,” he added. “They are the enemy of sane constituents because they don’t respect us.”

Here’s a local news report about the decision:


Seattle City Council overrides Durkan’s budget vetoes over police funds

www.youtube.com

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Defund the police gun violence Intelwars Minneapolis Minneapolis city council minneapolis police Violence

‘Living in a war zone’: Minneapolis residents ‘terrified’ of increased gun violence call out elected officials, demanding, ‘Show your face to us!’

Minneapolis has been seeing a serious spike gun violence in the months since the death of George Floyd. After the tragic incident, the City Council called for a defunding of the police. As violence began to rage, the those same elected city officials demanded to know where the police were.

And now, as their city is experiencing more gunfire on a daily basis and residents are worried for their lives in what some call a “war zone,” the members of the city council are apparently no where to be found.

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said the gun violence in Minneapolis is like nothing the department has seen in years, WCCO-TV reported.

Police are having trouble keeping up as an unusual number of police have elected to leave the MPD or retire following their elected leadership’s call to gut the department.

WCCO interviewed residents of north Minneapolis, and they had a message for the City Council: Show yourself.

First-hand account of gun violence

Resident Liz Cruz told the station that just next door, bullets from a gunfight passed through the house, went through the dining room, and lodged the pantry, WCCO reported.

“Honestly, I haven’t really been sleeping right now, I mean, I can’t because I hear every little thing that is going on — police sirens, like the helicopters, the gun shooting, everything” Cruz said.

Cruz gave the station security camera footage from her home that recorded extensive gunfire on her street at night.

“You’re sleeping and all of a sudden you feel like you’re in a war zone,” she said. “I have four children, and I’ll sleep with them all in my room, because I am scared and I’m terrified that something is going to happen to them.”

Cruz added that she and her family and neighbors have to run inside even in the afternoon because of gunfire.

Where is the leadership?

“Nobody sees what we’ve living, nobody is feeling what we’re feeling, because they’re not here,” Cruz told WCCO

What she really wants to know is: Where is the city’s leadership?

“Help us, come and see what’s going on,” Cruz said.

“We’re really not getting any responses from the mayor or the City Council,” she added. “We feel kind of alone right now.”

Then she looked into the camera and delivered a heart-felt demand.

“Come here. Meet with us. Face us. Stay here for a weekend. For the love of God, just come here and say something to us — the people that are freaking voting for you and depend on you to take care of us!” Cruz pleaded. “Where are you? Show your face to us. Do something. Don’t just sit there and let your city go down to the ruins. Do something for us.”

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Defund the police Intelwars Minneapolis Minneapolis city council Police violent crime

After vowing to abolish police, Minneapolis City Council demands to know ‘Where are the police?’ as violence plagues the city

After the tragic death of George Floyd rocked the nation, the Minneapolis City Council — which is composed of nearly all Democrats — took the lead in the anti-police movement, voting to defund the city’s police department. The council sought to replace traditional law enforcement with newer community-based, alternative forms of policing.

But as violent crime has plagued the city for months, the city council is now asking: “Where are the police?”

What’s the background?

As TheBlaze reported, the Minneapolis City Council passed a resolution in June to replace the city’s police department with an alternative “community safety” model.

The development came days after the council promised anti-police residents that they would completely dismantle the city’s policing system.

What is happening now?

During a two-hour meeting with Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo this week, the Democratic city council, in brazen fashion, demanded to know why city police are not responding to the violence with enhanced law enforcement measures.

From Minnesota Public Radio:

The number of reported violent crimes, like assaults, robberies and homicides are up compared to 2019, according to MPD crime data. More people have been killed in the city in the first nine months of 2020 than were slain in all of last year. Property crimes, like burglaries and auto thefts, are also up. Incidents of arson have increased 55 percent over the total at this point in 2019.

“Residents are asking, ‘Where are the police?'” Councilman Jamal Osman said, MPR reported. “That is the only public safety option they have at the moment. MPD. They rely on MPD. And they are saying they are nowhere to be seen.”

Council President Lisa Bender, one of the loudest anti-police voices just months ago, claimed police are being “defiant,” according to MPR.

“This is not new,” she claimed.

Meanwhile, Phillipe Cunningham chided his colleagues for looking to the police for solutions when they called for the department’s abolition just a few months ago.

“What I am sort of flabbergasted by right now is colleagues, who a very short time ago were calling for abolition, are now suggesting we should be putting more resources and funding into MPD,” Cunningham said.

How was the response?

Arradondo told the council that he actually has taken measures to combat the spike in crime.

Arradondo explained that more officers have been added to patrols, additional resources have been allocated for investigative duties, and he has reiterated the seriousness of the crime issue with top department brass.

However, the department is also hemorrhaging personnel, Arradondo explained. In fact, more than 100 officers have left the department this year alone, more than double the usual number. With fewer officers, law enforcement becomes much more difficult.

Anything else?

As TheBlaze reported, momentum driving the push to disband the Minneapolis police department has dissipated because, as the Minneapolis City Council has learned, highly emotional rhetoric does not translate into functional policy.

“I think when you take a statement and then move into policy work, it gets more complicated,” Bender told the Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

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Abolish the police Defund the police George floyd Intelwars minneapolis police

Minneapolis City Council members realize police are important, pull back efforts to abolish department

The Minneapolis City Council’s attempt to defund or abolish the city’s police department appears to have lost momentum as the highly charged emotion after George Floyd’s death in May gives way to the reality of how important a police department is to public safety, according to the Star Tribune.

In the aftermath of Floyd’s death while being restrained by Minneapolis Police, the city council voted in favor of a commitment to replace the police department with another form of public safety. That effort failed to get on the November ballot, however, mostly due to a lack of detail on what would replace the police.

The obstacles have forced some city council members to face the fact that creating policy around the anti-police movement is more difficult than it may have appeared during the peak of protests and unrest in the city.

“I think when you take a statement and then move into policy work, it gets more complicated,” City Council President Lisa Bender told the Star Tribune.

As it turns out, while there was significant anger toward Minneapolis police after an officer kneeled on Floyd’s neck for nearly nine minutes during an arrest, many residents of the city still want armed, trained police officers on call to respond to dangerous situations. Even some who want significant reform of the police department feel the idea of abolishing it altogether is extreme and unhelpful in solving the problem.

The Star Tribune reported:

Others wonder if the council already squandered the moment, by taking such a drastic stance that it alienated some who would otherwise support substantial reform.

“They really did miss the opportunity to create actual change,” said Michelle Gross, of Communities United Against Police Brutality. “It’s almost as if changing the police is a bad word, and you’re supposed to be talking instead about getting rid of police.”

In the days following Floyd’s death, council members fielded a flood of messages from constituents, some demanding they abolish police and others wondering why their 911 calls were going unanswered.

Efforts to defund the police in Seattle also stalled in the months after intense protests that included a literal occupation of nine city blocks and a police precinct. The city council voted to slash the police budget significantly, potentially resulting in the loss of 100 officers. However, Mayor Jenny Durkan vetoed that proposal. Durkan said she vetoed it due to a lack of planning for how to compensate for the loss of that much of the police force.

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Black lives matter protests Defund police Defund the police Intelwars Jenny durkan black lives matter Jenny durkan veto police officers seattle police department

Mayor Jenny Durkan vetos measure by Seattle City Council to defund the police and cut up to 100 police officers

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan said she would veto budget changes passed by the Seattle City Council to defund the police. The proposals could have cut up to 100 officer positions.

The proposals follow upon demands from Black Lives Matter protesters to “defund the police” and reroute the funds to social services, the lack of which is said to be the root cause of crime and violence.

Durkan indicated that she was open to something similar to what the council had passed, but that they had not collaborated enough with her office before passing he measure.

“This veto was because the bills as passed did not have the type of collaboration that I think we will have going forward, and that I’m hopeful we will have going forward,” she explained on Friday.

The proposal would have only cut $4 million from the department’s $400 million budget. Seattle has about 1,400 police officers.

Sawant dissents

Kshama Sawant, one of the most far left progressive members of the city council, voted against the measure, but only because they didn’t go far enough to defund the police.

“Seattle Mayor Durkan remains hostile to defunding police. Democratic Councilmembers completely failed to keep their public promises of 50% defunding in the Summer budget vote, furthermore, approved an austerity budget after having promised anti-austerity,” Sawant tweeted on Thursday.

Criminal justice alternatives

Durkan however, appeared to approve of seeking community-based alternatives to traditional policing methods as a response to crime in the city.

“We must stop gun violence,” Durkan emphasized.

“We know that enforcement and policing is only one part of the work that needs to be done to do so,” she added. “We also have to work with trusted community partners, who can work both to de-escalate situations, and provide alternatives to the criminal justice system.”

Durkan also noted that there’s been a 50% increase in shootings since June 1st in the beleaguered city.

The Democratic mayor made headlines in June when she angrily denounced Black Lives Matter protesting at her home and vandalizing it after she had previously shown support for the movement.

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Black Lives Matter Black lives matter protests Defund the police Intelwars New york city crime New york city violence Violence interrupter program Violence mitigation program

‘Violence interrupter’ says young man was shot during mediation — NYC is pouring millions into the community program

New York City is pouring millions into community programs intended to offer alternatives to normal policing in an attempt to quell the rise in violent crime.

Visol Smith is employed as a “violence interrupter” at Sheltering Arms, a community program in Far Rockaway, a neighborhood in Queens. He told WLNY-TV that young man was shot right in front of him as he tried to mediate the situation.

“I was in a situation recently where a young man got shot right next to me,” said Smith.

“I was in the process of doing the mediation and um he got shot, you know, two times, I had to duck and cover,” he explained. “So I’ve been been in a situation where guns been pulled on me, you know, it’s part of the job.”

New York City is spending $16 million to support these programs, and Sheltering Arms is going to see their budget increase by 25 percent as a result.

Smith explained why he believed violence interruption could be a more effective policy than simple policing.

“Being that we live in the community and we’re for the community, people respect us, who we are,” he said. “We don’t get that push back, that mind your own business.”

The murder rate in New York City has increased by 23% so far in 2020.

Black Lives Matter activists have demanded community efforts like “violence interrupters” to be employed instead of a police force as part of the “defund the police” strategy. Some cities, like Austin, Texas, have already begun to reroute funding away from the police department to social services they say will address the underlying causes of crime and violence.

A poll in July found that most Americans either want funding for the police to stay the same, 42%, or for funding for the police to increase, 31%. Only a quarter of Americans polled said they supported funding for the police to decrease.

Here’s the local news report:


$16 Million Citywide Initiative Hopes To Curb Gun Violence Using ‘Violence Interrupters,’ Community

www.youtube.com

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Abbott vs defunding cities Austin City Council Austin police department Defund the police Greg Abbott Intelwars police reform Texas

Texas Gov. Abbott says he will freeze property tax rates of cities that defund their police

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott warned that he would freeze property tax rates of any city that would defund its police force, a policy that has been advocated by supporters of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Abbott made the suggestion during a news conference Tuesday when he excoriated the Austin City Council for partly defunding its police force.

“When crime is on the rise, the last thing we should do is defund law enforcement — and yet that is exactly what the City of Austin did,” Abbott said. “Defunding police puts residents in danger and it invites lawlessness into our communities.”

The Austin City Council voted to reduce the funding for its police force by a third, about $150 million, and to reinvest that money in social services. Among those services are violence prevention programs, food access, and increased access to abortion.

Abbott reiterated his plan in a tweet from his official social media account.

“Under my plan any city that defunds police will have their property tax revenue capped at current levels. Cities can’t cut law enforcement [and] then turn around and increase taxes on the residents they just endangered,” tweeted Abbott.

Abbott noted that crime has increased in Austin and the reduced police force will likely worsen the situation for residents.

“Just because there is an act, or many acts committed by law enforcement does not mean that we reduce law enforcement,” Abbott said.

Austin mayor responds

Austin Mayor Steve Adler responded to the media briefing from Abbott and denied that the city was crippling law enforcement or endangering its citizens.

“The press conference today was not about facts. It presented no data. It was about trying to make us scared,” said Adler.

He also explained that only $20 million was being defunded directly from the police department, while the rest of the redirected funds would not result in a reduction of law enforcement response. He also argued that Austin’s murder rate was comparatively low, even if it had seen a recent drastic increase.

Here’s a local news video about his plan:


Texas Governor Greg Abbott Sets Out To Freeze Property Tax Rates In Cities That Defund Police

www.youtube.com

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Abortion access Austin Austin City Council Austin police department Defund the police Intelwars Reimagine safety fund

Texas city approves massive police budget cut; funds to be diverted to abortion access, other programs

The city of Austin, Texas, plans to cut its police department budget by one-third, or $150 million, after the city council unanimously approved the proposal to reallocate the funding to, among other priorities, abortion access programs, according to the Texas Tribune.

The Austin Police Department’s $434 million budget will be cut by a third, with $21.5 million of that cut going immediately to fund abortion access, violence prevention, and food access programs.

Over the course of the next year, $80 million more will be redistributed to fund forensics and victims’ services in other city departments. And $50 million will be reallocated to the “Reimagine Safety Fund” to pay for “alternative forms of public safety and community support.”

One suggested reimagining of public safety is the use of unarmed civilians for traffic enforcement functions.

Austin’s police defunding movement comes partially from the George Floyd killing in Minneapolis that sparked nationwide riots, but also from the officer-involved shooting in April of Mike Ramos, a black and hispanic man, in Austin.

Someone called 911 on Ramos, claiming he and a woman were doing drugs in a car in an apartment parking lot, and saying he had a gun that he was holding up and pointing at the woman. Police arrived on the scene and confronted him. He got out of the car, lifted up his shirt and his hands, and said he was unarmed.

While Ramos was standing outside the car with his hands up, an officer fired a less-lethal round at Ramos, who then gets back in the car after the shot. He tried to drive off, and Officer Christopher Taylor shot three times at the car, killing Ramos. No gun was found on Ramos or in the car.

Attorneys for the officers have said police felt Ramos might have intended to use the car as a weapon against them.


Critical Incident Briefing – April 24, 2020

youtu.be

Other major cities, such as Seattle and Minneapolis, are pushing for heavy cuts to police budgets. Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best retired from her position after 28 years with the department after her city council voted to cut spending so severely that as many as 100 officers could be cut from the force.

“This is not about money,” Best said, according to KING-TV. “And it certainly isn’t about demonstrators. Believe me, I have a lot thicker skin than that. It really is about the overarching lack of respect for the officers.”

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Defund the police Disband police Intelwars Jkc trucking Trucking company Trucking police

Trucking company announces it won’t deliver to cities pushing to defund police

A trucking company based in Illinois announced recently that it will no longer deliver to cities that are calling for police to be defunded.

Mike Kucharski, co-owner of JKC Trucking near Chicago, told Fox News last week that transporting valuable cargo into areas where a police presence may be reduced unnecessarily puts his drivers at risk.

“Our first priority is to support our drivers and their safety when they are on the road,” Kucharski said during an interview on “Fox & Friends First.”

Kucharski added that he is also concerned that his insurance coverage may change for delivering into states with reduced police presence when he renews his contracts at the end of the year.

“Another issue that I am seeing in the future is I have cargo insurance, liability insurance, fiscal damage insurance, and I am very curious how when I renew my contracts at the end of the year, if there is going to be language — if I am going to even have coverage going into these places,” he said.

The cargo on board trucks makes them an obvious target for theft or robbery, and thus a potential insurance liability.

A CDL Life poll published in June found that 79% of drivers, if given the option, would refuse to pick up or deliver loads to cities with disbanded or defunded police departments.

Several respondents on the poll noted that many areas they pick up from or deliver to are already dangerous, and that now with several cities moving to diminish their police presence, the dangers have only escalated.

“This is not an area you need to act fearless and think you you’d look like a fool for saying ‘no,'” one respondent said. “Imagine what kind of fool you [would] look like for driving into a hot spot and putting your life in danger.”

Another added: “If something was to happen and you have to take matters into your own hands, you risk being prosecuted for protecting yourself.”

USA Today reported late last month that half of the 258 law enforcement agencies surveyed by the Police Executive Research Forum have slashed budgets or are planning to do so soon.

The outlet noted that much of the funding is being taken from accounts designated for “equipment, hiring and training” even as violent crime surges in a number of cities across the country.

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Carmen best Defund the police Intelwars Seattle seattle police Seattle police chief

Seattle police chief resigns after city council votes to slash police budget and cut up to 100 officers

Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best — who has denounced “mob rule” in the city amid Black Lives Matter protests and has been targeted by “aggressive protesters” — announced her resignation Monday night.

The decision came only hours after the Seattle City Council voted 7-1 to cut the police department annual budget by about $3 million, a move that could reduce the department’s force by 100 officers, KING-TV reported.

The outlet reported that Best’s resignation was “due to council actions, including a proposed massive pay cut, plus the council’s refusal to denounce marches to her house.”

Best was also reportedly excluded from the council’s discussions about police budget cuts and other changes to the police department.

In a letter to Seattle police officers, Best thanked them for their service alongside her for more than 28 years and urged them to “take care of one another.”

“I am confident the department will make it through these difficult times,” she added. “You truly are the best police department in the country, and please trust me when I say, the vast majority of people in Seattle support you and appreciate you.”

Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan issued a response shortly after accepting Best’s resignation “with a very heavy heart.”

According to KCPQ-TV’s Brandi Kruse, the chief was outspoken in her opposition to budget cuts and was specifically offended by a proposal to cut her pay by 40%.

“I do feel like it’s … animus toward me specifically,” Best reportedly told Kruse in an interview.

Earlier in the summer, police evacuated a six-block area of Seattle as CHAZ (or CHOP) protesters set up an autonomous zone. While Democratic state and local officials did little to stop them and rejected the use of police to dismantle the zone, Best condemned the situation as “absolutely appalling.”

“Rapes, robberies and all sorts of violent acts have been occurring in the area and we’re not able to get to [them],” Best lamented.

KING-TV reports that Best and Durkan will further explain the chief’s decision to resign in a press conference Tuesday morning. Best, who took on the department’s top role in 2018, was the first black police chief in Seattle’s history.

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Defund the police Intelwars Pro-police Seattle Silent majority

Silent majority roars in Seattle: Massive pro-police rally held ahead of defund the police vote

The so-called “silent majority” spoke very loudly in Seattle on Sunday.

City residents turned out in droves for a “Back the Blue” rally outside city hall ahead of a major vote on Monday that would take funding away from the city’s police department.

Videos and photographs posted to social media showed what appeared to be thousands of people outside Seattle City Hall, adorned in blue shirts and holding signs to show support for law enforcement.

Seattle resident John Balph, who said that police reforms are needed and called Black Lives Matter “a very worthy movement,” said that defunding the police department is a “haphazard” prospect.

“There’s bad enough news from the White House and Trump,” Balph told the Seattle Times. “But it’s depressing to live in Seattle right now.”

“Is this the city the council wants to represent, a deserted city?” he continued. “It’s not the Seattle I want to live in. But average citizens can’t do anything about it. It’s very frustrating.”

The pro-police rally came ahead of a controversial vote by the Seattle City Council that will likely slash a significant portion of the Seattle Police Department’s budget — although the cuts will not amount to 50%, a number that anti-police advocates had sought.

“We are going forward together on a grand social experiment. We will have a smaller police department than we did for 2019, attorney Scott Lindsay, a former city official, told KOMO-TV.

The vote comes after the city council has already made significant cuts to the police department, targeting the SWAT team, the mounted division, the harbor division, and the Navigation Team,” a division of the police department dedicated to handling homeless people.

Pro-police demonstrators who protested the inevitable police budget cuts said that just because law enforcement reform is needed, that does not mean police budgets should be cut.

“Just because we need more social programs does not mean we need to defund the SPD. We can have both. We can fund the SPD, fund crime protection and fund law enforcement,” a woman told KOMO.

Counter-protesters, including Antifa, showed up on Sunday, but the demonstration remained largely peaceful, according to the Times, with the exception of a small fight.

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black Americans Defund the police Gallup Intelwars Police Police presence

Most black Americans don’t want less police presence in their communities, poll shows

More than 80% of black Americans either want the same level of police presence in their communities, or an increased police presence, according to a recent Gallup poll.

In fact, 20% of black Americans feel their communities are under-policed and need more police presence, compared to only 17% of white Americans, while 61% of black Americans favor maintaining the current level of police presence.

At the same time, a higher percentage of black Americans reported seeing police often or very often when compared to white, hispanic, or Asian Americans. Most of the black Americans who reported seeing police often in their neighborhoods also said they wanted the same level of police presence, or an increase.

The problem, if conclusions can be drawn from the results of this poll, is not that there is too much police presence and interaction in black communities, but that the interactions that occur are viewed unfavorably by many black Americans. From Gallup:

Although Black Americans seem about as comfortable as Americans overall with the amount of police presence where they live, they differ markedly in their perceptions of how their local police might treat them if they were to interact.

Fewer than one in five Black Americans feel very confident that the police in their area would treat them with courtesy and respect. While similar to the 24% of Asian Americans saying the same, it is markedly lower than the 40% of Hispanic Americans and the 56% of White Americans who feel this way. This could either stem from Black Americans’ own negative experiences with the police or from their familiarity with people who have had negative encounters with law enforcement.

The poll results showed that black Americans who have had negative interactions with police in the past, or who have the least amount of confidence that they will be treated fairly and respectfully when they encounter police, are “much more likely” to want less police presence in the community.

The poll’s findings are notable during an era in which many protests and political efforts, often undertaken on behalf of black Americans, call for significantly defunding police departments, or in some cases, fully dismantling them.

A proposal to disband the Minneapolis Police Department failed to get on the November ballot, as the commission tasked with reviewing the proposal rejected it due to its vagueness. George Floyd was killed by Minneapolis Police Department officers in May, sparking weeks of anti-police riots and protests around the country.

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Alex villanueva Defund the police Intelwars Los Angeles Police social justice

LA County could redistribute nearly $1B from law enforcement to ‘social programs’

Los Angeles County residents will vote this November on whether to redistribute nearly $1 billion in funding from county law enforcement to “social programs.”

According to KTTV-TV reporter Bill Melugin, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to include the charter amendment on November’s ballot.

“It would strip $880 million away from Sheriff’s Department, court system, DA’s office, and redistribute it to low income areas/social programs,” Melugin reported. “Supervisor Kathryn Barger was the lone ‘no’ vote, saying this proposal was rushed, wasn’t transparent, had no feedback from stakeholders, and could result in job cuts to county employees as well as budget issues down the road. Other Supervisors say let the voters decide.”

The proposal, which has been dubbed “Reimagining L.A. County,” mandates that at least 10% of the county’s net cost be earmarked for “social programs,” according to Melugin.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said the program is not about defunding the police, but rather expanding the so-called social safety net, KTTV reported.

“It’s time to bring our budget into alignment with our actions, intentions and vision. The supervisors have said we want to move people from custody to care, and our constituents are pleading with us to expand housing and treatment options and stop relying on punitive, outdated law enforcement tactics,” she said.

If approved by voters, the program, whose goal is “to address the disproportionate impact of racial injustice,” would be fully implemented by June 2024.

More from KTTV:

If passed by voters, the charter amendment would allocate funds to be spent in a number of broad categories, including youth development programs, job training for low-income communities, access to capital for minority-owned businesses, rent assistance and affordable housing, community-based health services and jail diversion programs.

It would prohibit such funds being used for or redistributed through law enforcement or correctional agencies, including the District Attorney’s Office, but would not prohibit its use to cover costs related to trial courts. The ordinance cites only a percentage of “the county’s locally generated unrestricted revenues in the general fund,” not an absolute number.

Not surprisingly, the program would adversely impact public safety, L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva warned last week, explaining he would be forced to close several patrol stations in the county.

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Alex villanueva Defund the police Intelwars Los Angeles Police social justice

LA County could redistribute nearly $1B from law enforcement to ‘social programs’

Los Angeles County residents will vote this November on whether to redistribute nearly $1 billion in funding from county law enforcement to “social programs.”

According to KTTV-TV reporter Bill Melugin, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to include the charter amendment on November’s ballot.

“It would strip $880 million away from Sheriff’s Department, court system, DA’s office, and redistribute it to low income areas/social programs,” Melugin reported. “Supervisor Kathryn Barger was the lone ‘no’ vote, saying this proposal was rushed, wasn’t transparent, had no feedback from stakeholders, and could result in job cuts to county employees as well as budget issues down the road. Other Supervisors say let the voters decide.”

The proposal, which has been dubbed “Reimagining L.A. County,” mandates that at least 10% of the county’s net cost be earmarked for “social programs,” according to Melugin.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said the program is not about defunding the police, but rather expanding the so-called social safety net, KTTV reported.

“It’s time to bring our budget into alignment with our actions, intentions and vision. The supervisors have said we want to move people from custody to care, and our constituents are pleading with us to expand housing and treatment options and stop relying on punitive, outdated law enforcement tactics,” she said.

If approved by voters, the program, whose goal is “to address the disproportionate impact of racial injustice,” would be fully implemented by June 2024.

More from KTTV:

If passed by voters, the charter amendment would allocate funds to be spent in a number of broad categories, including youth development programs, job training for low-income communities, access to capital for minority-owned businesses, rent assistance and affordable housing, community-based health services and jail diversion programs.

It would prohibit such funds being used for or redistributed through law enforcement or correctional agencies, including the District Attorney’s Office, but would not prohibit its use to cover costs related to trial courts. The ordinance cites only a percentage of “the county’s locally generated unrestricted revenues in the general fund,” not an absolute number.

Not surprisingly, the program would adversely impact public safety, L.A. County Sheriff Alex Villanueva warned last week, explaining he would be forced to close several patrol stations in the county.

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Defund the police Defund the police movement Intelwars Police Tyler Perry

Tyler Perry weighs in on the debate over defunding the police: ‘We need more police’

Media mogul Tyler Perry delivered his opinion on the movement to defund the police that has garnered notoriety since the nationwide protests against police brutality began in late May. The actor said he does not support “taking money from the police department” and proclaimed that “we need more police.”

Perry appeared on “Anderson Cooper 360 Wednesday night, where he weighed in on the contentious debate over defunding the police.

“You gotta understand this: I am not for taking money from the police department,” Perry told CNN host Anderson Cooper. “I think we need more police.”

“My studio is in a neighborhood where I think we need police,” Perry said. “But we don’t need police that are undertrained.”

Perry’s $250 million film production facility, one of the largest studios in the U.S., is in the Sylvan Hills neighborhood in southwest Atlanta. In 2015, Perry purchased 330 acres of property that was formerly U.S. Army base Fort McPherson, which was controlled by the Confederate government after Georgia’s secession in 1861.

“I think we need the police. I know that I need the police,” Perry continued. “I have several that work for me here at the studio. We need them. But we need them reformed. We need them trained well, we need the right structure.”

“I became very, very optimistic when everybody galvanized together, because I know that’s when change comes,” Perry said of the nationwide anti-police brutality movement following the death of George Floyd. “When people galvanize and come together as one, that’s when change happens. But lately, I’ve been very, very concerned that the message is being hijacked by some other groups, or political ads and parties that are trying to stop the message of what we’re asking for here is police reform.”

“When I first heard it, I was troubled by it,” Perry said of the movement to defund the police. “I thought, ‘OK, this is gonna be weaponized in this political year.’ I completely thought that that was happening, that’s exactly what’s happened. It’s been weaponized.”

“Some of the things inside of defund the police, I really understand,” the multimillionaire entertainment mogul said. “Like having officers who are clinically trained to deal with certain situations. I think all of those things are helpful, but taking money from the police department to make the police department smaller, that troubles me.”

In June, Perry wrote an essay in People magazine discussing police brutality.

“The level of racism and brutality that George Floyd faced is something that we as black people know all too well,” Perry wrote. “When I saw that video, I had so many raw, guttural emotions. I felt for him and his family, I felt for all of us as black people, I felt for my five-year-old son.”

In July, Perry teamed up with officers from the Atlanta Police Department to personally hand out 1,000 gift cards for the Kroger grocery store chain to Atlanta residents.

“This is about the community that I love, that I live and work in. This is about good people who are in need of a hand up, not a handout,” Perry told ET. “This is about the good police officers who do their job well every day, some of which are my personal friends.”

“This is about trying to bridge unity in a city that adopted me and held me up high enough to reach my own branch on the tree of success,” Perry said. “I love Atlanta and its people!”

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anti-police Defund the police Intelwars portland Protests Riots

Young children in Portland protests told by adults to say ‘F*** the police’ on video

Small children were given signs that read “f*** the police” and encouraged to repeat the vulgar anti-police phrase on camera during protests in Portland, the Daily Wire reported.

The young children were marching with adults in the anti-police protests that have taken place in Portland, Oregon, for nearly two months. The adults told the kids to say “f*** the police,” and provided positive reinforcement when they did.

An Axios-Ipsos poll from June 2 showed that far fewer African Americans (36%) trust local law enforcement to look out for their best interests and the interests of their families than white Americans (77%) Hispanic Americans (62%) and all Americans (69%).

That perception can and is being passed on to younger generations, which could result in even worse relations between police and the black community in the years to come.

The extended anti-police protests in Portland are different from some of the other large-scale protests that have occurred around the country in that Portland is overwhelmingly populated by whites. Census data reports that 77.1% of Portland residents are white.

Federal agents have been in the city attempting to establish peace, but have so far been unsuccessful and found themselves in violent clashes with protesters. USA Today reported:

Federal law enforcement agents clashed repeatedly with protesters early Friday morning, pushing through the streets to disperse crowds approaching the Mark O. Hatfield Federal Courthouse in a running battle of tear gas, fireworks and pepper spray, the surreal atmosphere exacerbated by multiple people playing the “Imperial Death March” from “Star Wars” on portable speakers.

Fae Preston, a 21-year-old white protester, said some of the unrest is being caused by “bored white kids,” but that a majority of the demonstrators are sincerely seeking change.

“There’s not a lot of things people like us can do,” Preston told USA Today. “We can vote, but does that really make a difference when the system is so stacked against us? Government’s purpose is to serve the people. This is showing they are not serving us.”

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, in an attempt to serve the people, joined a protest on Wednesday night, was among those tear-gassed by federal agents attempting to disperse the rowdy crowds, and was then harassed and chased inside by protesters who were cursing and throwing objects at him.

“He wanted to be among the people so he went into the crowd and they knocked the hell out of him. That was the end of him,” President Donald Trump said of Wheeler’s experience, USA Today reported.

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Police officers shouldn’t be responding to rape calls if the suspect runs away, Minnesota AG Keith Ellison says

Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison said it would be better to not have police officers responding to rape calls in situations when the rapist has already fled, according to The Federalist.

Instead, Ellison suggests, it is preferable to have a social worker trained in interacting with rape victims respond to such a call. In making his point, Ellison dismisses police officers as people who are simply trained in how to use guns.

“If you’re a woman who’s been a victim of a sexual assault, and the assailant ran away, wouldn’t you rather talk to somebody who is trained in helping you deal with what you’re dealing with, as opposed to somebody whose main training is that they know how to use a firearm? Right?” Ellison said on a virtual panel with PBS’s Yamiche Alcindor and California Democratic Rep. Karen Bass.


Democrat AG Keith Ellison Says He Doesn’t Want Police Officers To Respond To Rape

youtu.be

Ellison’s comments are similar to rhetoric that has surrounded efforts to defund or dismantle police departments in liberal localities. The idea is that police officers shouldn’t be responding to things that could conceivably be handled more effectively by social workers or other unarmed officials, in order to minimize the potential for unnecessary violent conflicts that can lead to police killings.

Applying that to mental health crises or minor traffic stops carries its own problems, but applying it to the violent crime of rape is even more controversial and potentially dangerous.

Also, Ellison’s description of police as nothing more than people who know how to use guns is inaccurate and indicates a narrow way of viewing police that is potentially fueling anti-police rhetoric. Police officers are trained to respond capably to a variety of situations that don’t require the use of firearms, including sexual assaults.

For victims’ comfort, and for public safety, having police respond to not only take care of the victim but to work quickly toward catching the suspect is crucial, even and especially if that person has fled the scene.

Ellison faced accusations of sexual abuse in 2018.

Minneapolis, where George Floyd was killed by police officers on May 25, has been ground zero of the recent anti-police movements that followed Floyd’s death. Last month, the city council voted to start the process of replacing the police department with an alternative model.

From WCCO-TV:

The charter amendment calls instead for “a department of community safety and violence prevention.” It also includes a provision for licensed law enforcement officers.

“As a charter department, the director would be nominated by the Mayor and approved by the City Council. The director would have non-law enforcement experience in community safety services, including but not limited to public health and/or restorative justice approaches,” the council reported in a press release.

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Black lives matter vandalism Blm vandalism Cancel rent Defund the police Intelwars Oakland mayor libby schaaf Oakland mayor's house Oakland protests

Black Lives Matter protesters vandalize Oakland mayor’s home; she accuses them of terrorism

The Democratic mayor of Oakland, California, accused vandals who left Black Lives Matter messages spray painted at her home of trying to “terrorize” her and her family.

The incident occurred in the early morning on Tuesday outside Mayor Libby Schaaf’s house.

Witnesses say that 30 to 40 protesters dressed in black fired off projectiles and firecrackers during the vandalism. They spray-painted messages on the mayor’s stone wall, sidewalk and garage, including “Defund OPD,” “homes 4 all,” and “blood on your hands.”

A neighbor of the mayor told KGO-TV, “I know there’s a lot of unrest and frustration and I sympathize with that, but this was jarring and felt like to another level.”

A spokesperson for Schaaf released a statement condemning the vandalism.

“This attack designed to intimidate the Mayor and strike fear into her family, will not stop her from advocating for the policies she believes are in the best long-term interests of her beloved hometown,” said Justin Berton.

“Like all Oaklanders, she supports passionate protest but does not support tactics meant to harm and terrorize others,” the statement concluded.

“A wake up call to Libby”

The Sacramento Bee reported that a post at the San Francisco Independent Media Center’s website contained a message from someone claiming responsibility for the vandalism.

“Last night we sent a wake up call to Libby and a call for action to the whole Bay Area. We left a note on her garage, and treated her to a nice fireworks display and the musical notes of pots and pans and assorted noisemakers,” read the message.

“Our message to Libby and other elected officials is simple: You have the power to take the boot off our necks — so we have the duty to struggle against you until that boot is lifted,” they added. “You can’t hide from your responsibility!”

The message included four demands from the group. They called for the defunding of the Oakland Police Department, cancellation of rent, “Homes for All,” and “Drop the Charges,” without elaborating.

Police are investigating the vandalism.

“Racist dog whistle”

President Donald Trump has threatened to send federal officers to Oakland in order to quell the protest violence there.

“Oakland is a mess. We are not going to let this happen in our country,” he has said.

On Monday, the day before the vandalism on her home, Schaaf called the threat a “racist dog whistle.”

Here’s a local news report about the vandalism:


Oakland Police Investigating Vandalism Attack On Mayor Libby Schaaf’s Home

www.youtube.com

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Woman is brutally murdered after community leader suggests citizens settle disputes without calling police

A Brooklyn woman is dead after she reportedly attempted to settle a dispute with a group of people without the help of the New York City police.

What are the details?

According to the New York Post, 33-year-old Shatavia Walls approached a group of people who were reportedly illegally setting off fireworks on July 4.

Walls, according to her mother, was “just following the advice of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams,” who suggested citizens settle disputes through “community policing,” and without the aid of trained law enforcement officials.

Walls approached the group, and asked them to stop firing off the explosives in the area in which children were playing.

This apparently didn’t sit well with the group, as at least one person from the group reportedly began to chase Walls with a gun, and shot at her while she sought safety in her mother’s apartment building.

Walls, who was not injured at the time, was able to recover the shell casing as well as the suspect’s driver’s license, which was dropped while fleeing.

Walls’ mother, Helen Testagros, said her daughter immediately reported the incident to New York City police, but insisted that the department took no action at the time.

The department instead said that it did not learn of the incident until July 7 — after the same suspect reportedly shot Walls eight times after she confronted a second group of people who were illegally setting off fireworks three days after her first encounter with revelers.

What else?

Adams has repeatedly called for citizens to mediate nonviolent disputes without the help of police in order to cut down on the amount of police-on-citizen crimes.

“Stopping fireworks cannot turn into fireworks between the police and the community,” Adams said in June remarks directed at increasing complaints of illegal fireworks detonations. “We want a good community response to dealing with a nuisance. … This is a non-violent act, so those three numbers that we all dial — 911 — get over that.”

“She watched the news,” Testagros, Walls’ mother, told the outlet of her daughter’s decision to confront the group. “Yes, she heard it. It was probably in the back of her mind. It’s not a good idea. You don’t know who you are approaching. These kids are not respectful anymore. … They’re more ruthless.”

She added that the suspect fired shots at her daughter until the gun’s chamber was depleted.

“[Walls] was on the ground shot. And [the suspect] kept shooting until the gun went ‘click, click, click,'” she recalled.

In a statement about the incident, Adams said, “My heart goes out to the family of Shatavia Wells on this horrific accident. Gun violence has hurt too many innocent people in our city from 1-year-old Davell Gardner to this dynamic young lady. Dangerous people are shooting innocent people for senseless reasons. I renew my call for cracking down on the scourge of illegal guns.”

He added, “Our call is to continue building an ecosystem of public safety that includes community response and police. Whenever someone exhibits violence, we should call the police, but whenever we can communicate peacefully with our neighbors, we should do so.”

Trump blasts uncivilized behavior

On Monday, President Donald Trump addressed Wells’ murder in remarks to reporters at the Oval Office.

“I love New York,” Trump said. “[But] look at what’s going on over there. The woman who was shot because she said, ‘Could you please not light off firecrackers?’ And they turned around and shot her eight times and she died. That’s not our civilization, that’s not about us.”

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Anti-BLM protesters dump paint on Black Lives Matter mural near Trump Tower: ‘Refund the police!’

Two protesters poured paint on the Black Lives Matter mural in front of Trump Tower in New York City on Saturday afternoon. During the demonstration, an NYPD officer was injured.

Christian activist Bevelyn Beatty from the At The Well Ministries dumped paint over the Black Lives Matter mural on New York’s Fifth Avenue. While spilling black paint over the yellow letters, Beatty shouted: “Refund the police,” which is a counter argument to the suddenly trendy “defund the police” movement.

“Black lives matter, but you want to defund the police for black people. You’re lying,” Beatty said. “We’re not standing for Black Lives Matter! We want our police.”

On her Instagram, Beatty called Black Lives Matter a “domestic terrorist organization.” “They don’t care about black lives,” she wrote. “They support the killing of more than 600K Black Babies every year!”

While on her hands and knees spreading the paint around, a police officer attempted to apprehend Beatty, who was wearing a shirt that said: “Jesus Matters.” She flailed her arms, and the cop fell face-first into the pavement. The officer was injured from the hard fall and taken away in an ambulance to Bellevue Hospital with non-serious injuries.

The mayor’s office said the vandalism was unacceptable, and that the New York City Department of Transportation will be repainting the mural that stretches from 56th to 57th street.

Beatty, 29, and Edmee Chavannes, 39, both from Staten Island, were charged with criminal mischief.

Beatty also vandalized the Black Lives mural in Brooklyn this weekend by pouring paint all over the letters.

The Black Lives Matter mural near Trump Tower has been vandalized four times since it was painted on July 9 with the help of New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D).

On Friday, two people were arrested for spreading blue paint on the Black Lives Matter mural as they chanted: “All lives matter” and “Blue lives matter.”

Earlier this month, a Black Lives Matter mural on a suburban Chicago street was altered with paint to read: “All Lives Matter.”

A Black Lives Matter mural in Martinez, Calif., was vandalized on the Fourth of July. The couple who painted over the letters with black paint were charged with a hate crime.

“Today, the Contra Costa County District Attorney’s Office charged Nichole Anderson (42-years old Martinez resident) and David Nelson (53-years-old Martinez resident) with three misdemeanor counts, including a hate crime, for their alleged actions on Saturday, July 4, when defendant Anderson covered up a Black Lives Matter mural with black paint,” read the statement from Contra Costa County District Attorney Diana Becton.

Slightly Offens*ve” host Elijah Schaffer gave his commentary regarding the couple being charged with a hate crime for painting over a mural.

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Chris Wallace Defund the police Donald Trump fact check Fox News Intelwars Joe Biden

Chris Wallace interrupts Trump to fact check him — then Trump stops interview to look for proof

An interview between Fox News anchor Chris Wallace and President Donald Trump became so heated on Friday that the president stopped the interview and made staffers search for documents after Wallace fact checked him.

During the interview, Trump claimed Joe Biden’s charter with Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) advocates defunding the police. But Wallace fact checked the president, pointing out that it does not.

“Biden wants to defund the police,” Trump claimed.

“Sir, he does not,” Wallace shot back.

“Look he signed a charter with Bernie Sanders—” Trump replied.

“It says nothing about defunding the police,” Wallace interrupted.

That’s when, according to Wallace, Trump abruptly paused the interview and asked staffers to bring him a copy of the Biden-Sanders charter. Trump reportedly then looked through the document, but was unable to prove what he had claimed.

After taping the interview, Wallace explained on Fox News, “That led to a very interesting exchange where he had his staff go out and get the highlights from that 100-page compact that the Biden team and the Sanders team had signed and he went through it and he found a lot of things that he objected to that Biden has agreed to, but he couldn’t find any indication — because there isn’t any — that Joe Biden has sought to defund and abolish the police.”

Indeed, although Biden has called for de-militarizing the police and has echoed some Democratic rhetoric about law enforcement, he has not advocated for abolishing police departments.

The complete interview with Trump will air on “Fox News Sunday.”

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Black Lives Matter Defund police Defund the police Intelwars Police funding police reform Polling Polling on black lives matter

New poll shows very few Americans want to defund police

A new poll found that many more Americans want funding for police to increase or stay the same than those that want police to be defunded.

Black Lives Matter protesters and activists have made the defunding of police forces a central platform of their political demands.

A Pew poll released on Thursday shows that few Americans support the policy.

A plurality of Americans, 42%, said that they want the funding for police to stay the same. Another 31% of Americans said they want funding for police to increase.

Both of those groups are larger than the group that called for the defunding of police only 25% of those polled.

Of those who want the police defunded, 12% said they wanted police funding to decrease by a “a lot,” while 14% said they wanted police funding to decrease “a little.”

President Donald Trump has come out forcefully against the defunding of police, but when presumed Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden was asked if he supported the policy, he also said no.

A small increase in support for BLM

Other results from the poll show an increase in support for some parts of the narrative of the Black Lives Matter movement.

There was a small drop in Americans who said the police do an “excellent or good job of protecting people from crime,” from 62% four years ago to 58% in the newest poll.

A greater drop was found among Americans who agreed that police are doing a good or excellent job of “treating racial and ethnic groups equally,” from 47% down to 34%.

Two thirds of those polled also said that civilians should have the power to sue police officers “to hold them accountable for misconduct and excessive use of force.”

Here’s more about polling on the police protests:


Most Americans support police reforms: poll

www.youtube.com

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Defund the police Dismantle police George floyd Intelwars Minneapolis minneapolis police Police

Black peace activists fight Minneapolis City Council’s plan to dismantle the police: ‘It’s time to stand up … utopia is a bunch of BS’

Following the protests that stemmed from the killing of George Floyd by a city cop, the Minneapolis City Council pledged last month to begin the process of dismantling the Minneapolis Police Department. But that plan has not sat well with citizens who have seen crime grow in their communities and want to know what will be done if they’re no longer able to count on the police.

Now a group of black peace activists is taking on the leadership of the city of Minneapolis over its push to dismantle the police.

The group held an “urgent news conference” Tuesday to raise their voices against the council’s plan, WCCO-TV reported.

One of the activists, Lisa Clemons, who is a former police officer and is now with “A Mother’s Love,” told reporters, “We cannot continue to watch these bullets flying through our community.”

For Clemons and her fellow advocates for peace, the time has come to “stand up” to the City Council and call its plan what it is: “B.S.”

“It is time for us to stand up in this city. It is time to tell the City Council that utopia is a bunch of B.S.,” Clemons said.

With the recent escalation in shootings in the city, she said Minneapolis is more like the Old West.

“We are not in Mayberry R.F.D.,” she said. “We are in the wild, wild, West, and it is time for some answers.”

Calling out a council member

Shortly after the news conference, Clemons was speaking to WCCO outside the venue when City Councilwoman Andrea Jenkins happen to pass by. The councilwoman was one of the members who voted to move closer to dismantling the police.

Clemons challenged Jenkins to come answer some questions, and Jenkins obliged.

When challenged on her position on dismantling the police, Jenkins said she knows the city still needs public safety officers, but the force needs to be “reimagined.”

“I want to reimagine a police force that responds to the community in a way that is respectful,” Jenkins said.

Clemons challenged Jenkins on the “recent surge in street violence.”

“My only response to that is we are going to have, we will have those conversations,” Jenkins replied. “We are in an emergency situation.”

Despite the council’s pledge to dismantle the police, ultimately any change would have to be voted on by the people of Minneapolis, WCCO noted.

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Davon mcneal Defund the police Guardian Angels gun violence Intelwars John ayala Washington D.C.

Grandfather of 11-year-old shooting victim says defunding police isn’t the answer: ‘We need the police’

Davon McNeal was an 11-year-old boy killed by a stray bullet in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, and his grandfather told Fox News that defunding the police is not the answer to gun violence problems in major cities.

Davon was reportedly grabbing a phone charger before heading to a Fourth of July cookout when five men shot up the area for reasons currently unknown to police. McNeal was hit with a stray bullet and died later in the hospital. No arrests have been made, and the police are seeking public assistance in identifying suspects.

Davon’s grandfather, John Ayala, said on “The Story” on Monday that crime will only get worse if there are fewer police officers on the street.

“You can’t take money from the police department,” Ayala said. “We need the police. You take the police from there and we wind up having less police officers in the street and less detectives. It’s not going to work. Crime is going to get worse … if you start having less police officers, who’s going to come when there is a need for police services?”

Ayala disagrees with activists who think the police are the biggest problem when it comes to violence against black people.

“Before going to go after the police officers when they hurt someone that looks like me, they need to go after the people that look like me that hurt people that look like me,” Ayala said.

At least six children were killed in shootings over the weekend, including shootings in Atlanta and Chicago. Atlanta Mayor Keisha Bottoms’ comments on the killing of an 8-year-old girl were similar in their sentiment to what Ayala said — that members of the community are harming their own people more than the police are.

“You can’t blame this on a police officer, you can’t say this is about criminal justice reform,” Bottoms said of the shooting, which happened in a protest zone. “This is about some people carrying some weapons who shot up a car with an 8-year-old baby in the car. We got to stop this. We are doing more harm than any police officer on this force.”

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