Categories
author Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast helicopter parenting Intelwars New York Times Best Seller NYT bestseller Parenting parenting expert podcast Remarkable People Podcast ted talk viral TED talk writer

Julie Lythcott-Haims: Writer, Speaker, and Human

This episode’s remarkable guest is Julie Lythcott-Haims. She is an author, speaker, former educator, and former corporate lawyer. 

Julie holds a BA from Stanford, a law degree from Harvard, and an MFA in writing from the California College of the Arts. She ended her legal career to go to work at Stanford and was the Dean of Freshmen and Undergraduate Advising. In other words, she advised first-year students. 

She is the author of four books: New York Times Best-selling How to Raise an Adult,  Real American: A MemoirWriting Memoir, and soon to be released Your Turn: How to be an Adult. This is the most passionate and eloquent interview I’ve ever conducted. You’ll hear what I mean shortly. 

This episode of Remarkable People is brought to you by reMarkable, the paper tablet.

This was a deep dive interview covering questions like:

  • Two questions to ask people and yourself regarding racism
  • How children can do for themselves instead of being a helicopter parent
  • Preparing your children to be tougher in the face of difficulties
  • How non-Blacks can use their privilege to call out racism and micro-aggressions

 


Question of the week: Do you call out racism when you see it? It takes bravery. Learn more on this week's #remarkablepeople w/ @jlythcotthaims.
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Guest, Julie Lythcott-Haims

Make sure to watch Julie’s TED talk How to raise successful kids — without over-parenting It’s already over 5 million views!

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

Categories
Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to succeed in Silicon Valley Intelwars Lisa Leopold podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Lisa Leopold: Professor and Linguist

Have you ever wondered if you know how to make a good apology? This episode’s remarkable guest is professor Lisa Leopold, and she will answer your questions about apologies and credibility.

Lisa is an associate professor at the Middlebury Institute of International Studies. She’s also the program coordinator for the Institute, English for academic and professional purposes program.

She has an MA in teaching English to speakers of other languages from the University of Illinois at Urbana at Arbana champagne and a BA from St. Olaf College. I first learned about Lisa’s work because of an article she wrote for the website called The Conversation.

This is a site that publishes articles only written by academics and researchers. It is the best source that I have found for credible factual and interesting articles.

I chatted with Lisa about:

  • What makes a great TED talk
  • How to pique your audience’s curiosity
  • Breaking down the elements of a good story
  • And the science of a good apology

Given how close we are to the election, this episode could not be more timely. We need to know who is credibly speaking. Please share with at least one person who would enjoy this.

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question of the week: What do you think makes a good apology? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Host, Lisa Leopold

Categories
Algebra of Happiness Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to succeed in Silicon Valley Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Scott Galloway What makes people happy?

Scott Galloway: Professor, Author, and Entrepreneur

This episode’s guest is probably the most outspoken person I’ve had on the show so far. His name is Scott Galloway. Scott is a professor of marketing at NYU Stern and the founder of section4. He was also the founder of the eCommerce company Red Envelope and the marketing firm Profit, a previous guest David Aaker is vice chairman of Profit.

I highly recommend his presentation on YouTube called The Algebra of Happiness it, he tells it like it is and tells it like he sees it and explains what makes people happy. Spoiler alert: it is not pursuing your passion. Scott served on the board of directors of Eddie Bauer, the New York Times Company, Gateway Computers, Urban Outfitters, and the Berkeley Haas School of Business.

In this episode, he shreds Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg, the thought that colleges should open back up in the middle of a pandemic, and cluelessness in general.

Tell me? Have you ever heard anyone rip into Facebook and stupid decisions of politicians like Scott Galloway? Clearly he’s not trying to win any popularity contests. And that’s just one factor that makes him such a remarkable person.

He is a data point for all of us to tell it like it is.

 

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question: What do you think makes people happy?
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Host, Scott Galloway

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Scott Galloway: Professor, Author, and Entrepreneur appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast Intelwars Kathryn Finney podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Kathryn Finney: Author and Startup Whisperer for Black and Latinx Women

In this episode of Remarkable People, my guest is the remarkable Kathryn Finney. She is an entrepreneur investor, speaker, mentor, author, and pioneer. Kathryn has achieved many firsts. She started one of the first fashion blogs called the Budget Fashionista; MSN called it one of the hundred most useful sites on the web.

She was the first credentialed blogger at New York Fashion Week. She was the first blogger to receive a major book deal. She was the first blogger to appear on the Today Show. She started the first venture capital fund focused on Black and Latin X women founders. The Obama administration appointed her to the National Advisory council on innovation and entrepreneurship, and she was a White House Champion of Change.

Kathryn has received numerous honors and awards, such as the Grace Hopper Social Impact ABIE Award, which recognizes those who have made a positive impact on women, technology, and society. Working Mother’s 50 Most Powerful Mothers, Marie Claire’s 10 Women to Watch, Entrepreneur Magazine‘s Women to Watch, and the Ebony 100 Black Entrepreneurs 40 under 40 lists.

I loved this interview and Kathryn’s message so much that I am sharing my mic with her for the day. Today, Kathryn will be taking over my Linkedin and Twitter accounts to post whatever she wants.

In this episode of Remarkable People with Kathryn Finney we talked about:

  • Starting the very first fashion blog [before WordPress!]
  • Creating her blog book tour to her publisher’s horror
  • How in 2016 that only 11 Black women had raised over a million through venture capital
  • Growing up in Minnesota and a reflection on their current issues

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question: If you could take over anyone's social media for the day, who would it be? What would you share?
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Kathryn Finney

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Kathryn Finney: Author and Startup Whisperer for Black and Latinx Women appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Apple evangelist Blog Canva Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to launch a product How to make a remarkable product introduction How to succeed in Silicon Valley Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Steve Jobs Macintosh product launch

How to Product Launch Like a Boss

Have you ever wondered how you could pull off a remarkable production introduction?

Usually, the Remarkable People podcast features interviews with remarkable people, such as Jane Goodall, Steve Wozniak, Arianna Huffington, Margaret Atwood, Martha Stewart, Sir Ken Robinson, Chef Roy Yamaguchi, Kristi Yamaguchi, Stephen Wolfram, Gary Vaynerchuk, or iJustine. But every once in a while, I like to change things up and provide a mini keynote about it. The goal for these mini keynotes is to help you become more remarkable as easily and quickly. This episode’s topic is how to launch like a boss.

For some people, life is a bitch. For me, it’s a launch. This episode provides a roadmap to how to launch a product in a way that helps it escape gravity, “cross the chasm,” and “dent the universe.”

I’ve been involved with many, maybe too many product introductions. Of course, the mother of all product introductions was Macintosh January 24th, 1984.

Since then I’ve introduced software, hardware, books, and this podcast. I’d like to pass on some tactical and practical tips for you right now.

GIF of Motorola launch

How to product launch like a boss

In this episode of Remarkable People with Guy Kawasaki:

  • How to create a remarkable product launch
  • How marketing has been turned upside down
  • Why a person’s title doesn’t matter
  • Why you need to stop being paranoid

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question: Have you been inspired to purchase from a product launch? What did you buy?
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post How to Product Launch Like a Boss appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Canva co-founder Canva design CEO of Canva Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to innovate Intelwars Melanie Perkins podcast Remarkable People Podcast unicorn startups

Melanie Perkins, Canva

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is the Remarkable People podcast. My remarkable guest, Melanie Perkins, has built an enormously successful global company from Sydney, Australia.

To be completely transparent, the company is Canva, and I am Canva’s chief evangelist. In other words, Melanie is my boss.

Be that as it may, she is a remarkable person, and Canva is a remarkable company. People have created over 3 billion designs in Canva since 2013. Approximately 6-7 million designs are created each day in 190 countries. 90,000 schools and universities use it.

Melanie came up with the idea for Canva when she was studying at the University of Western Australia. She was tutoring other students on how to use design programs and realized they were far too complex and expensive. It was then that she realized the future of design was going to be simpler, online and collaborative.

To test out the idea, Melanie and Cliff Obrecht launched FusionBooks, an online design platform for students to create their school yearbooks.

FusionBooks took off in schools across Australia, New Zealand, and France, and soon Melanie was able to prove that her new approach to design was possible and needed.

She then set out to apply the ease of use principles of FusionBooks to a broader audience, and thus Canva was born.

Melanie spent the next several years trying to raise venture capital. She was rejected hundreds of times before she found her first investors. I started working at Canva about six years ago. She found me because my tweets utilized Canva graphics, and the rest is history.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now here is my remarkable boss, Melanie Perkins.

In this episode of Remarkable People with Melanie Perkins:

  • How Canva got started
  • How the Canva team bootstrapped the startup for years
  • How Canva’s freemium model helped build their base
  • Learn about Canva’s culture and how it’s grown with them

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question: If you could add one new feature to @Canva, what would it be?
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Melanie Perkins

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

Guy Kawasaki with Melanie Perkins and Cliff Obrecht [Canva co-founder and Chief Operating Officer] at their first meeting in 2014 in Silicon Valley at Guy’s house.

Canva team with Guy Kawasaki

The post Melanie Perkins, Canva appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Entrepreneurship innovation Intelwars sap the art of innovation

Sneak Peek: The Art of Innovation and Data-Driven Enterprise

On the Remarkable People podcast, I interview people such as Jane Goodall, Woz, and Stephen Wolfram who have changed the world. Their stories are inspiring, and I hope they encourage you, too. 

This post has a different twist – let’s look at why and how you can foster change and the art of innovation in your company by driving your company with data.

Background: data is a good thing

We’ve been talking about being evidence-based, fact-based, and data-based for decades, but if you’re not up to speed with this, you aren’t alone. According to NewVantage Partners’ study, 69% of companies have failed to create a data-driven organization.

There is an avalanche of studies that support the business benefits, including this Forrester report indicates that data-driven companies grow at an average of more than 30 percent annually and are on track to earn $1.8 trillion by 2021. 

Forrester did another study that concluded that businesses that rely on data management tools to make decisions are 58% more likely to beat their revenue goals than non-data driven companies.

Being data-driven isn’t only about revenue results. There’s also transparency and fairness. If everyone has access to the data driving decisions, we can establish reasonable data ethics policies that create even playing fields.

Why companies haven’t succeeded at this data-driven change

In my upcoming keynote at SAP’s Data and Analytics Virtual Forum: Data To Outcome, I’ll give you real inspiration and tips so you can get started. That’s the hard part, right? A few sneak peeks:

  1. This isn’t corporate altruism. The culture change, funding, and language start at the top. How do you do that? Attach your initiatives to real business outcomes. (No, “agility” is not a business outcome.) Here’s a highlight from McKinsey on how ShopRunner’s CEO made the change

For tips on speaking the language of business, securing on-going funding, and getting buy-in from your executives, check out this free Data strategy master class

In the end, this is a culture change. You need executives to model the right behavior, which requires you to get them analytics without days of manual assembly. You need executives to ask ad hoc questions of their analytics and brainstorm with other board members on innovative solutions. Are you there yet?

  1. To understand what is possible, survey the current technology landscape for data and analytics offerings. Web searches are easy. The hard part is accurately assessing where you are now. Luckily, there are free assessment tools, including SAP’s Next Generation Database & Data Management Assessment, which offers a unique approach to enable best-in-class database & data management processes in support of strategic priorities.
  2. Join SAP’s Data and Analytics Virtual Forum: Data To Outcome and you’ll be able to schedule one-on-one time with industry veterans to discuss how to renovate your data landscape, and even put your hands on some free software trials.

Therefore, what?

Your supply chain is challenged. Your revenue model is under pressure. Your employees are dealing with unprecedented challenges. Do you know what you need to solve all of those problems? Real-time data and data literacy to interpret that data.

All the supply chain optimization, new business models, collaboration models, and new markets require timely and intuitive access to data to drive innovative ideas. It’s a mistake to entrust these ideas to only data geeks. 

The goal is to be able to answer a simple question and foster innovation to jump to the next curve. The question is, “Therefore, what?”

Data management is the “therefore” part. It enables you to see what’s happening to your organization, to see what trends are shaping the reality of your customers, and to read the tea leaves to understand what your opportunities.

Then you can take these insights and create the “what.” In other words, what new products, services, and practices will enable you to meet and exceed the needs of your customers and “dent the universe.”

I invite you to tune in to my keynote and the entire event for inspiration, encouragement, practical tips, and advice from other customers. Ask me questions. Ask the other presenters questions. Come away in two days with a plan that will motivate and drive your business.

This post is sponsored by my friends at SAP. 

The post Sneak Peek: The Art of Innovation and Data-Driven Enterprise appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Art of the Start Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to innovate How to succeed in Silicon Valley Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast speaker

How to Be a Remarkable Innovator

Have you ever wondered how you could be a remarkable innovator?

A little bit about my background, I was the chief evangelist of Apple and am currently the chief evangelist of Canva, an online, graphics-design company from Australia. I have authored fifteen books including The Art of the Start, Enchantment, and The Art of Social Media. I am also a brand ambassador for Mercedes-Benz – someone has to do it, right?

I give over fifty keynote speeches per year. My clients include Apple, Nike, Gartner, Audi, Google, Microsoft, and Breitling as well as dozens of trade associations. My speech topics include innovation, enchantment, social media, evangelism, and entrepreneurship. Although events are now virtual and we’re all at home, there’s plenty of opportunities to gather inspiration for your journey.

In this episode of Remarkable People, I’m going to give you a mini-keynote called How to be a Remarkable Innovator. I hope this episode of Remarkable People helps you and your business. And now, How to be a Remarkable Innovator.

 

In this episode of Remarkable People with Guy Kawasaki:

  • How to be a remarkable innovator
  • What I learned from the toughest teachers and bosses [including Steve Jobs]
  • Why your goal should be to make meaning [not money]

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Question: Who are your innovative inspirations?
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post How to Be a Remarkable Innovator appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Anna Wintour story Annie Leibovitz Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Karen Mullarkey Katherine Graham Life Magazine Martin Luther King Jr. photos at Life podcast Remarkable People Podcast Richard Avedon

Karen Mullarkey

This episode’s guest is not merely remarkable, but she’s been called a “national treasure” because of her work as a photo editor for Life Magazine, Newsweek, Psychology Today, Sports Illustrated, and Rolling Stone.

Her name is Karen Mullarkey. She launched the career of many of the most famous photographers in the world. You’re going to hear stories about Annie Leibovitz, Richard Avedon, Gordon Parks, Herb Ritts, Anna Wintour, and Katharine Graham.

Her interview was so remarkable that I created a list of references to the people and topics that she mentions. You can peruse the list here.

I conducted this interview by phone while she was vacationing, so you’ll get to hear the cardinals chirping in the trees and the answering machine ringing where she was staying. When is the last time you heard an answering machine ringing???

Here’s a challenge for you. If you know of anyone who has pictures of two women at Christo Vladimirov Javacheff’s “Running Fence” in June or July 1976, those pictures may have been taken by Richard Avedon! It would be epic to use social media to find the pictures.

I know you’re going to love this interview with Karen Mullarkey, the national treasure of photo editors.

I hope that you found this episode as “wow” inspiring as I did. It was utterly fantastic to hear stories about legends in photography, news, and fashion.

I second the motion that Karen is a “national treasure.” If you know anyone interested in photography, news, or fashion, please tell them to listen to this episode.

My thanks to Prescott Lee for suggesting Karen as a guest. That was a stroke of brilliance.

My thanks for Peg Fitzpatrick and Jeff Sieh who I treasure too.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. Live a long time–wear a mask and stay away from crowds. Mahalo and aloha.

If the spirit moves you, please review Remarkable People. [instructions]

This week’s question is:


Do your current habits support the person you wish to become? What advice will you take from Karen to excel in your career? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Karen Mullarkey

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

Please enjoy the photo gallery below by clicking on the images. The photo of Karen with sunglasses is by Annie Leibovitz.

The post Karen Mullarkey appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog differently abled kids Down's Syndrome Gigi Gianni GiGi's Playhouse Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Nancy Gianni parents of children with Down's Syndrome podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Nancy Gianni

This week’s remarkable guest is Nancy Gianni, Founder and Chief Belief Officer of GiGi’s Playhouse, author of GenerationG, and CNN Hero.

After her daughter GiGi was born with Down Syndrome, Nancy started GiGi’s Playhouse to change the way the world views Down syndrome and to send a global message of understanding and acceptance.

Backing up, let me provide some basic information about Down Syndrome. Typically people are born with 46 chromosomes. Babies with Down Syndrome have an extra copy of chromosome 21. This affects a baby’s physical and mental development.

In the United States, approximately 6,000 babies are born with Down Syndrome each year–or 1 out of every 700 babies or so.

Gigi’s Playhouse has sixty locations that provide educational, therapeutic, and career training for people with Down Syndrome and their families–all for free!

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now here is the remarkable force of nature named Nancy Gianni.

Nancy and GiGi Gianni of GiGi's Playhouse

I hope you found Nancy’s dedication to helping people with Down Syndrome inspiring and remarkable.

If you’d like to help Gigi’s Playhouse, go to gigisplayhouse.org. I believe Nancy when she says that the experience of working with people who have Down Syndrome is beneficial to everyone.

My thanks Janet Viane for suggesting interviewing Nancy and for making it happen.

PS – Listen to the end of the podcast to hear reviews of Remarkable People. Maybe I will read yours.

PPS: If the spirit moves you, please review Remarkable People. [instructions]

This week’s question is:


Have you had a time in your life where you had to step it up to succeed? How did you do it? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Nancy Gianni

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

Nancy and GiGi Gianni at the Cubs game

The post Nancy Gianni appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
black authors Blog feminist Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Jamia Wilson podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Jamia Wilson

Welcome to the Remarkable People podcast. This episode’s guest is Jamia Wilson.

Jamia wears many hats–and all of them well. She is a feminist, activist, writer, and speaker. She is also the director of the Feminist Press at the City University of New York.

But first things first. If by any chance, you know Colin Powell, please ask him to listen to this episode. He will get a kick out of it.

Ben Carson, however, won’t like this episode so don’t tell him.

Jamia is, in short, a leading voice for feminist and women’s rights. Her writing has appeared in the Washington Post and New York Magazine, and she has spoken at SXSW, TEDx, and TED. She was named by Refinery29 as one of the 17 Faces of the Future of Feminism.

The titles of her books are revealing: Big Ideas for Young Thinkers, Young Gifted and Black, The ABCs of AOC, Step Into Your Power, and Road Map for Revolutionaries.

She’s even appeared with Gloria Steinem and Jane Fonda–maybe Jamia will like this episode so much she’ll help me get them as guests!

Click below to listen to Jamia Wilson, who brought a ray of sunshine into my life, with this interview.

Don’t forget to tell Colin Powell to listen to this episode if you know him. I hope that you agree that people like Jamia are what it’s going to take to make America decent again.

She is destined to do remarkable things in her career.

I’m Guy Kawasaki and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick who bring rays of sunshine into my life too.

PS – Listen to the end of the podcast to hear reviews of Remarkable People. Maybe I will read yours.

PPS: If the spirit moves you, please review Remarkable People. [instructions]

This week’s question is:


Do you have any former heroes that have fallen from grace for you? Who was it and why? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Jemia Wilson

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Jamia Wilson appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Dr. Jerome Kim Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Iolani School podcast Remarkable People Podcast UNDP

Dr. Jerome Kim

This week’s remarkable person is Dr. Jerome Kim. He is the director general of the International Vaccine Institute.

The International Vaccine Institute was established in 1997 as an initiative of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Its mission is to: Discover, develop, and deliver safe, effective, and affordable vaccines for global public health.

Dr. Kim has a BA from the University of Hawaii and an MD from the Yale University School of Medicine in 1984. He completed his training in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Duke University Medical Center.

He was the principal deputy and chief at the Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Pathogenesis at the Military HIV Research Program. He also served as project manager for the HIV Vaccines and Advanced Concepts Evaluation Project Management Offices. He led the Army’s Phase III HIV vaccine trial (RV144), the first demonstration that an HIV vaccine could protect against infection. He has authored over 200 publications.

He was named one of “The 50 Most Influential People in Vaccines” in 2014 by the vaccine industry organization Vaccine Nation.

Another of his claims to fame is that we went to the same high school in Hawaii, Iolani. We even had many of the same teachers.

And now, bringing you the straight scoop on vaccines, here is Dr. Jerome Kim.

I feel better with people like Dr. Kim being involved in the development of a coronavirus vaccine.

As you heard, the creation of a vaccine a complex and difficult process, and the medical industry is doing things very differently this time around.

Let’s hope that Dr. Kim and his colleagues around the world are successful in the near future. I, for one, will probably not fly commercially until there is a vaccine.

By the way, at the very end of the podcast, you heard both of us say Iolani no ka oi. That’s Hawaiian for Iolani is the best.

My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for their remarkable work to make this podcast as good as it is.

PS – Listen to the end of the podcast to hear reviews of Remarkable People. Maybe I will read yours.

PPS: If the spirit moves you, please review Remarkable People. [instructions]

This week’s question is:


Will you get the coronavirus vaccine when it's available? Why or why not? #coronavirus #COVID #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Dr. Jerome Kim

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Dr. Jerome Kim appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog David Ige Governor David Ige Governor of Hawaii Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast

David Ige: Governor of Hawaii

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. This episode’s guest is David Ige. He is the governor of the state of Hawaii.

Hawaii has the least number of coronavirus infections, adjusted for population, of any state in the union. It also has the least deaths, adjusted for population.

I interviewed Governor Ige to understand how Hawaii achieved these remarkable results. It is true that Hawaii is surrounded by water, so controlling infection by outsiders is easier.

But there’s no doubt in my mind that if some of the other governors were the governor of Hawaii, the results would not be the same.

Governor Ige was born and raised In the Pearl City area of Honolulu. He attended the University of Hawaii where he got a degree in electrical engineering. He worked for GTE Hawaiian Tel after college.

He started his political career in 1985 when Governor George Ariyoshi appointed him to fill a vacant seat in the Hawaii House of Representatives. He and his wife have three children.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now here is Governor David Ige.

Picture of Governor By Dallas Nagata White – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=70247272

Photo of Governor and First Lady Ige By Daniel Ramirez  , CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=56661162

If nothing else, I hope you learned that Hawaii takes its 14-day really seriously. Don’t be flying there and the post pictures of you cruising around Hawaii because you will get arrested

The lesson of Governor Ige is that listening to scientists and doctors, taking decisive action, and putting people’s lives above partisan politics is how to control a pandemic.

This attitude is sorely missing in much of the United States. As an exercise, compare and contrast what your political leadership has done.

I’m Guy Kawasaki and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to Mufi Hannemann, the CEO of the Hawaii Lodging and Tourism Association. Think about how hard that job must be now. He’s also running for the mayor of Honolulu.

Mahalo also to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for magic that makes this podcast happen.

PS – Listen to the end of the podcast to hear reviews of Remarkable People. Maybe I will read yours.

PPS: If the spirit moves you, please review Remarkable People. [instructions]

This week’s question is:


What actions and protections would you like to see in your state for COVID-19? Do you feel your state has handled it well? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, David Ige

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post David Ige: Governor of Hawaii appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast iJustine inspirational people Inspirational stories of immigrants Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast What does it take to succeed on YouTube? You Tuber

iJustine: Digital Influencer, YouTuber, Tech Reviewer, and Gamer

I’m Guy Kawasaki. And this is the Remarkable People podcast.

This episode’s guest is Justine Ezarik, or as you might know her: iJustine. iJustine is a YouTube personality, actress, social media influencer, and all-around nice person.

Have you ever looked at some person and asked, Why does she have so many followers?

Why does she get all the free equipment? Why does she get all the attention? And you get jealous and maybe even hostile, but not iJustine.

I am so happy for her success. She’s been in four films, seven TV shows, and twenty-one web series. Her YouTube channel is thriving.

One of the funniest things she ever did was after the iPhone was introduced in June 2007 in August, she showed a video where she had a 300 page iPhone bill.

She really got the attention of many people when she started one of the Internet’s first and most popular-“livecasts,” inviting people around the world to watch her every move, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. Within ten days of release, her “300-page iPhone bill” had garnered more than 3 million views and international media attention. These days, iJustine is a one-woman new media phenomenon: The popular techie, gamer, vlogger, and digital influencer has an army of nearly 3.5 million subscribers across multiple YouTube channels, with total views over one billion.

There’s a lot to learn from iJustine’s story of the ascension to the top of social, her technology, and her video techniques. And her sense of moral obligation.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now here is iJustine.

iJustine on Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People podcast

I hope that iJustine brought humor, inspiration, and information into your life. If nothing else, you learned that it is hard to make something like social media look easy.

She is a remarkable person and a nice person to boot.

I’m Guy Kawasaki. And this is Remarkable People. Thanks to the remarkable people who make this podcast what it is: Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick.

Until the next episode of remarkable people, take care. Be safe, be healthy, Mahalo, and Aloha.

This week’s question is:


Do you check tech reviews on YouTube before making purchases? What did you buy as a result? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, iJustine

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post iJustine: Digital Influencer, YouTuber, Tech Reviewer, and Gamer appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Inspirational stories of immigrants Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Sam Wineburg

Sam Wineburg: History professor, author, truth-seeker, and Wikipedia fan

Sam Weinburg is the Margaret Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University. He heads the Stanford History Education Group. This organization seeks to improve the teaching of history. It is currently focusing on helping students learn how to interpret online content.

Sam is the author of Historical Thinking and Other Unnatural Acts and Why Learn History (When It’s Already on Your Phone). The former book won the Frederic W. Ness Award from the Association of American Colleges and Universities for work that significantly contributed to the “improvement of Liberal Education and understanding the Liberal Arts.”

In this podcast, Sam is going to teach you better ways to discern fact from fiction in online content by using simple and easy methods. According to Sam, “The real question is how to create an informed citizenry in an age when we meet the world through a screen. Figuring this out is neither a regulatory nor a technological challenge. It’s an educational one.”

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now, to help you become a more critical consumer of online information is Sam Wineburg.

sam wineburg fake news

I hope that you’ll be able to use the techniques that Sam discussed to become a better consumer of online information. Remember that:

  • Wikipedia is your friend–especially the sources at the bottom of a Wikipedia entry.
  • Looks are deceiving. It’s easy to make a professional, legitimate-looking website.
  • Even the smartest people are easily fooled by online content.
  • Of all things, don’t believe what an organization says about itself. See what other pages say about the organization, its executives, and its street address.
  • Anyone can buy a .org website address, so don’t let that fool you into believing there’s a lack of profit motivation.

As we enter the election season in the U.S., the problem of deceit and fake news is only going to get worse, so please remember the wisdom of Sam Wineburg. Doing so could save America.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People.

This week’s question is:


Understanding factual knowledge and where it fits within a narrative is important. Narratives help us explain the world and give us context to history. Stories lodge facts into memory. #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Sam Wineburg

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Sam Wineburg: History professor, author, truth-seeker, and Wikipedia fan appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
American Dream Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Inspirational stories of immigrants Intelwars Martha Nino Mexican Immigrants traveling to United States podcast Reaching the American Dream Remarkable People Podcast

Martha Nino: Fighting for the American Dream

This episode’s remarkable guest is Martha Nino.

It’s unlikely that you’ve heard of her, but you someday will. She currently works at Adobe in a senior marketing position. How she came to be a guest is a good story.

10 years ago she saw me give a keynote speech for Adobe. I guess I impressed her.

A year ago Adobe held a diversity conference and invited employees to submit stories. Hers was one of 8 selected. Let’s just say that typically one doesn’t seek opportunities to talk about an illegal alien past in front of your company, so that took courage.

A few months ago she happened upon one of my LinkedIn Live chats and reached out to me.

I usually ignore LinkedIn messages because most are requests to be BFFs with people I don’t know, but I read hers.

It pointed me to her video, and I liked it so much that I sent it to Jacob Martinez, the exec director of Digital Nest, an organization in Watsonville, CA that helps young people gain digital skills. I asked him if her message was suitable for this podcast.

He loved her talk and told me to go for it. So I reached out to her and asked her to be on this podcast.

How she achieved success is remarkable because she was born in a grass shack in central Mexico. Her parents were laborers on cotton farms there. Seeking a better life, her parents paid coyotes to smuggle them across the border. She made the trip separately as another woman’s baby.

She grew up in Fremont, California in a multiple-family, one-bedroom house. She began working at ten as a newspaper girl.

While in school, she worked for a manufacturer. For fifteen years, she and her parents were illegal aliens.

Her path was rocky, but she worked hard and achieved a college education. She entered the tech field in a facilities capacity, and now she’s working at Adobe.

She’s living the American Dream of starting with nothing and achieving happiness with her husband and two daughters. America is lucky to have her.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And here’s Martha Nino.

Martha Nino and her mother

I hope you found Martha’s story inspiring. She taught me several lessons:

First, I was lucky that I’m a third-generation American.

Second, you’ve got to love parents for what they are willing to do and risk to give their kids a better life.

Third, it doesn’t matter where you start, what matters is where you end.

Fourth, never under-estimate the kindness of strangers—even strangers who don’t look like you.

America is lucky to have her and the millions of immigrants like her who have made America great. Their presence is as good for America as it is for them.

This week’s question is:


What sacrifices has your family made to get you where you are today? How did that inspire you? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Martha Nino

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Martha Nino: Fighting for the American Dream appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Branding expert David Aaker David Aaker: “Father of Modern Branding” and AMA Marketing Hall of Fame® Inductee Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast

David Aaker: Father of Modern Branding and AMA Marketing Hall of Fame® Inductee

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. This episode’s remarkable guest is David Aaker.

David is the godfather of branding like Bob Cialdini is the godfather of influence. And like Bob, his work has shaped my concept of secular evangelism.

He is a professor emeritus of the Haas School of Business of UC Berkley, the vice-chairman of a marketing and branding firm called Prophet, and an executive advisor to the Japanese marketing and ad agency, Dentsu.

He has written 17 books. He has been evangelizing branding and storytelling long before almost anyone else. His latest book is called Owning Game-Changing Subcategories: Uncommon Growth in the Digital Age.

If you’re interested in storytelling, branding, and marketing and how they apply to innovation and product introductions, you’ll gain a great deal of insight from this episode.

For example, do you know why facts and descriptions just don’t cut it anymore? Keep listening to find out.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People, and now here is David Aaker.

David’s books and writings have been instrumental in my understanding of branding and marketing. I hope you learned enough about storytelling, branding, and marketing so that you can create an exemplary brand.

Here are the key lessons that I came away with:

  • One should use stories not facts
  • Products create brands, not vice versa
  • Companies don’t need to convince the entire market, just 15%
  • Companies need to create sub-categories or die

And now you know what it takes to be a quest on Remarkable People–that is, denting the universe as much as a Jane Goodall, Stephen Wolfram, Margaret Atwood, and David Aaker.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People.

This week’s question is:


Do you know why facts and descriptions just don’t cut it in #marketing anymore? Keep listening to find out. #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, David Aaker

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post David Aaker: Father of Modern Branding and AMA Marketing Hall of Fame® Inductee appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog California Hall of Fame Dancing With the Stars winner Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Kristi Yamaguchi Olympic figure skater Olympics hall of fame podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Kristi Yamaguchi: Olympic Gold Medalist and World Champion Figure Skater, Author, and Philanthropist.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. This episode’s remarkable guest is Kristi Yamaguchi.

I’m on a Yamaguchi streak right now. To my knowledge, she is not related to Roy Yamaguchi, the chef, and recent Remarkable People guest.

She may not have won a James Beard award, but she did win the Olympic figure skating championship in 1992 as well as the world championship in 1991 and 1992.

She didn’t do too badly in pairs either–with Rudy Galindo she won the 1988 World Junior Championship and the pairs national championship in 1989 and 1990.

Since then, she’s raised two daughters with her husband, professional hockey player Bret Hedican. Oh, and she won the 2008 Dancing with the Stars competition and started a foundation to help young people.

You’d think that her daughters, with the DNA of an Olympic gold medalist and an NHL Allstar, Stanley Cup winner, would both gravitate, if not rock, figure skating or hockey. But you’ll never guess what sport her oldest daughter has embraced. Keep listening to find out.

Yamaguchi was born in Hayward, California. Her grandparents were interned during WWII, like 120,000 other Japanese and Japanese-Americans at the time. She is sansei–third-generation Japanese American.

She once agreed to teach me how to do a triple lutz to celebrate scoring a goal in pickup hockey, but that never happened. I mean, she didn’t teach me the triple lutz, not I never scored in pickup hockey.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And now here is Kristi Yamaguchi.

Kristi Yamaguchi: Olympic Gold Medalist and World Champion Figure Skater, Author, and Philanthropist.

I hope you enjoyed this interview with my friend and erstwhile figure skating instructor Kristi Yamaguchi.

Now you know that if hula becomes an Olympic sport, you may see her oldest daughter bring home another gold medal.

Kristi’s story is one of years of sacrifice and hard work—the power of grit is a theme that we’ve heard over and over on this podcast.

The lessons that I learned from Kristi are:

  • The success of people are often built on the backs of the sacrifices of their parents

  • Competitiveness is a good thing. It drove Kristi to practice longer and harder from the time she finished in 11th place in a skating competition.

  • Still, to maintain competitiveness and grit, you have to love what you’re doing.

I’m Guy Kawasaki and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to the gold medal-winning pair of Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for helping me complete this episode.

And Bret, if you’re listening to this, Scott Hannan and I invite you to go surfing this summer.

This week’s question is:


What will you have to give up in order to reach your goals? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Kristi Yamaguchi

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

The post Kristi Yamaguchi: Olympic Gold Medalist and World Champion Figure Skater, Author, and Philanthropist. appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Coronavirus updates Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast Intelwars Learn from UCSC Coronavirus Team Learn from UCSC Coronavirus Team on Remarkable People podcast Remarkable People Podcast UCSC

Learn from UCSC Coronavirus Team on Remarkable People

My guests this week on Remarkable People are the esteemed UCSC Coronavirus Team. The UCSC Genomics Institute has been working around the clock to combat the coronavirus. I recently led a discussion into the pioneering research and results.

On May 6, 2020, I moderated a panel of three professors from UC Santa Cruz, for an organization called Santa Cruz Works. This organization’s mission is to make Santa Cruz a great place to start, sustain, and grow businesses. The topic of this panel was the research that the UC Santa Cruz community is doing regarding COVD-19. This special episode is an audio recording of the panel. I am publishing it because it answers many lay questions about COVID-19 tests and vaccines.

Three UCSC scientists were on this panel. Jeremy Sanford is a professor of molecular, cell, and developmental biology. He focuses on understanding the role of RNA binding proteins in regulating gene expression. He has recently launched a COVID-19 testing lab with a 24-hour turnaround.

Rebecca Dubois is an assistant professor in biomolecular engineering. She studies the molecular mechanisms of human virus surface proteins and uses her discoveries to design novel vaccines and antiviral therapeutics.

David Haussler is a distinguished professor in biomolecular engineering. He is a scientific director at the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute. He is well known for his work, leading the team that assembled the first human genome sequence in the race to complete the human genome project.

Learn about how UCSC is accelerating research on the SARS-CoV-2 virus for diagnostics, vaccines, and treatments.

I hope this podcast will enlighten you and give you hope that we have the UCSC Coronavirus Team and other bright scientists around the world working to solve the challenges of COVID-19.

Learn from UCSC Coronavirus Team on Remarkable People

This week’s question is:


What would you ask scientists about the coronavirus? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Thank you to these Remarkable People Guests on the UCSC Coronavirus Team:

David Haussler

Jeremy Sanford

Rebecca DuBois

And to Santa Cruz Works!

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. Thank you to the awesome scientists of UC Santa Cruz who participated in this event and to Doug Erickson and the Ohana of Santa Cruz works who made this panel happen and the Santa Cruz works Ohana. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for their awesome work in helping me deliver this podcast every week.

The post Learn from UCSC Coronavirus Team on Remarkable People appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Esther Wojcicki Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to be a good parent How to be a good teacher how to raise successful children inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Teacher of the year

Roy Yamaguchi: James-Beard award winner, flyin’ Hawaiian, and culinary comic

This episode’s guest is Roy Yamaguchi, the founder of Roy’s Restaurants, Tavern by Roy Yamaguchi, and Eating House 1849.

Roy was born and raised in Japan but now lives in Hawaii. He is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America and worked for famous restaurants such as L’Escoffier, L’Ermitage, and Michael’s.

He is also a television personality who starred in six seasons of Hawaii Cooks with Roy Yamaguchi on PBS. He has won many awards including the James Beard “Best Pacific Northwest Chef” Award in 1993.

I have had some of the best meals of my life because of Roy. For example, I once had a tomahawk steak at his restaurant that changed my life.

He and I get a little deep discussing local-boy eating in Hawaii. I don’t want you to miss anything on your next trip to Hawaii, so in addition to eating at Roy’s, be sure you check out Koko Head Cafe, Koa Pancake House, and Zippy’s.

And now here’s Roy Yamaguchi.

Award winning chef Roy Yamaguchi

I hope that Roy and I didn’t local-boy out too much for you. When two people from Hawaii start talking about local food, it’s hard to stop. I hope you noticed that Roy, unlike Andrew Zimmern, likes spam.

The next time you’re in Hawaii–if we ever fly again, you have to grab a meal at one of Roy’s restaurants. Here’s what you should order:

Big Eye Tuna Poke
Szechuan Spiced Pork Ribs
Blackened Island Ahi
Roy’s Melting Hot Chocolate Soufflé

The most important lesson that I learned is that you should clean as you cook. That’s my new goal.

This week’s question is:


What food reminds you of growing up and home? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Roy Yamaguchi

Izakaya Nonbei https://www.izakayanonbei.com/
Koa Pancake House http://www.koapancakehouse.com/
Zippy’s https://www.zippys.com/
Like Like Drive Inn https://likelikedriveinn.com/

Culinary Institute of America https://www.ciachef.edu/

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. Mahalo to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick who are the melting hot chocolate soufflés of podcasting.

The post Roy Yamaguchi: James-Beard award winner, flyin’ Hawaiian, and culinary comic appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Esther Wojcicki Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast How to be a good parent How to be a good teacher how to raise successful children inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Teacher of the year

Esther Wojcicki: Godmother of Silicon Valley, legendary teacher, and mother of a super-family

This episode’s remarkable person is Esther Wojcicki, educator, author, and mom.

She currently teaches journalism and English at Palo Alto High School. In fact, she was the northern California teacher of the year in 1990 and California teacher of the year in 2002.

The name of her book is How to Raise Successful People. She is well-qualified to write this book because she has three successful daughters.

  • Susan is the CEO of YouTube.
  • Janet is an anthropologist and assistant prof of pediatrics.
  • Anne is the co-founder of 23andMe.

In this episode we discuss her approach to education and raising children including her formula for success called TRICK which stands for:

Trust
Respect
Independence
Collaboration
Kindness

Among her students have been Steve Jobs’ daughter, actor James Franco, and Jeremy Lin, the former NBA basketball player.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. And with no further adieu, here is Esther Wojcicki.

Esther Wojcicki on Guy Kawasaki's Remarkable People podcast

Question of the week!

“I wanted [my kids] to be as independent and as informed as possible,” Esther Wojcicki said in an interview, on tour to promote her book How to Raise Successful People“That’s protection for life.”

This week’s question is:


Do you trust your kids so you can breed trust and allow them to learn to listen to themselves? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Esther Wojcicki

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

I hope that Esther has helped you understand the role of creativity, independence, and innovation in education.

Remember her TRICK: trust, respect, independence, collaboration, and kindness. Especially kindness these days.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for their constant flow of kindness. Mahalo to Jonathan Rosenberg for making this interview happen.

The post Esther Wojcicki: Godmother of Silicon Valley, legendary teacher, and mother of a super-family appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Bizarre Foods Blog Entrepreneurs Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast Small business owners The Art of Perseverance

The Art of Perseverance

This is a bonus episode of my Remarkable People podcast called The Art of Perseverance. It’s a kick in your pants mini-keynote to help entrepreneurs, small business owners, and managers figure out how to persevere during the pandemic. There won’t be any unicorns, pixie dust, or singing kumbaya while holding hands. We’re talking do or die decisions.

Buckle up and get a pep talk from Guy Kawasaki based on his experiences working at Apple when it was failing, advising companies during crises, and running his own companies in good times and harsh ones.

No one has been in this situation before. It’s more important than ever to make wise decisions.

I hope this episode of Remarkable People helps you and your business. And now, The Art of Perseverance.

Question of the week

This week’s question is:


How will you weather the storm? @GuyKawasaki shared The Art of Perseverance on his podcast this week. https://guykawasaki.com/the-art-of-perseverance/ ? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

I hope this bonus episode will bring you some clarity and help guide you through the storm.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick who are helping me get through this difficult time.

The post The Art of Perseverance appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Andrew Zimmern Bizarre Foods Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars podcast Remarkable People Podcast

Andrew Zimmern: Award-Winning Chef, Author, and TV Personality

This episode’s guest is the one and only Andrew Zimmern.

I adored his TV series called Bizarre Foods. Like Remarkable People, the title explains it all–Andrew went around the world eating bizarre foods and learning about different cultures.

It was a program that my family watched together. Whenever I traveled, I tried to watch an episode of Bizarre Foods to give me ideas for where to eat–not that I would eat what Andrew ate.

For example, I would not eat rotten shark in Iceland because I prefer ammonia on my window, not my plate.

Bizarre Foods lasted 15 years and there were 100 episodes. Andrew also won four James Beard awards and starred in many other culinary and cooking shows. He also wrote four books.

His latest TV series is called What’s Eating America, and it is a window into Andrew’s soul because he uses food to investigate, understand, and explain some of the most divisive issues facing America.

This episode is not all unicorns and pixie dust about eating great food. Many people don’t know this but early in his career struggled with drug addiction. We go into this in great detail in our interview.

By listening to this episode, you will learn the most important career tip that you can learn, why you really don’t want to eat tainted cumin, and how to pick a good restaurant.

The only thing about Andrew that disappoints me is that he hates spam. That is blasphemous for someone from Hawaii like me.

I’m Guy Kawasaki and this is Remarkable People. And now here’s Andrew Zimmern.

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Is there a food you love that is an acquired taste? Spam is no bueno for @AndrewZimmern. What do you think of it? #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Andrew Zimmern

Learn to make some great comfort food at home: Pasta Carbonara. This elegant Roman pasta is simple to make and one of the most soul-satisfying meals I can think of. It’s superb even without fussy ingredients, but it becomes HEAVENLY with seriously good cheese, and orange-yolked farm fresh eggs. It will change your life.

Andrew’s new show is What’s Eating America

In each episode, Andrew Zimmern travels the country to see first-hand the impact these critical issues– immigration, climate change, addiction, voting rights and healthcare– have on food and the everyday lives of Americans. What’s Eating America airs Sunday at 9PM ET on MSNBC.

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

So now you have the most important career advice you’ll ever hear: make yourself indispensable. Indispensable people get jobs, keep jobs, and make money.

And if I see you at a run-down hot dog stand in New York standing in line all by yourself, I will be very disappointed.

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this is Remarkable People. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick who as indispensable to me. Mahalo also to Tom Wiese and Shawn Hall for making this interview happen.

The post Andrew Zimmern: Award-Winning Chef, Author, and TV Personality appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share
Categories
Blog Guy Kawasaki Guy Kawasaki's Podcast inspirational people Intelwars Japanese American Japanese American authors Jeanne Wakatusuki Houston Manznar Japanese Internment Camps podcast Remarkable People Podcast speaker World War II

Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston: Japanese American Internment Camp Survivor and Memoirist

This episode’s guest is Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston. She is the author of Farewell to Manzanar.

This book was written in the 1970s when Jeanne was thirty-seven. It chronicles her family’s internment during World War II. It is one of the books that many American schools use to help students understand racism and prejudice.

Jeanne was seven when her family was uprooted from Long Beach and placed in the Manzanar internment camp in the High Sierra of California. In total, 120,000 Japanese suffered from the same treatment. It was done in the name of security. The fear was the Japanese and Japanese-Americans in America would sabotage America’s war efforts.

In this interview, she explains what happened to her and her family and her hindsights about the experience as well as how it relates to the racist environment in America today. However, don’t expect anger and bitterness–because she has come to terms with what happened.

In fact, she has traveled throughout America in order to educate people so something like this doesn’t happen again.

To fully understand her interview, here are some definitions and explanations:

  • Shikata ga nai is the Japanese concept that something “cannot be helped” or “nothing can be done.” It’s not necessarily defeatest or angry–it’s more like “it is what it is, so stop feeling sorry for yourself and suck it up.”
  • Issei refers to the first generation of Japanese to emigrate to America. Nissei is the second generation of Japanese-Americans. They were born in America, and she is one.
  • Kibei describes Japanese Americans, that is people born in America, who returned to Japan for their education, and then came back to America.
  • The 442 Regimental Combat Team was a part of the US Army. It was made up of primarily sansei Japanese Americans from Hawaii. The 442nd first fought in Europe during World War II. For its size and length of service, it is the most decorated unit in American military history. Much of the motivation of the members of the 442nd was to demonstrate their loyalty to America even when Japanese Americans were being interned.
  • The JACL is the Japanese American Citizens League. It is the civil-rights organization whose purpose is to foster the progress of Japanese Americans and Asian Americans to fight bigotry and prejudice.
  • Katonk is a term used in Hawaii and by people from Hawaii to refer to Japanese Americans born on the mainland. The interview discusses the difference in perspective between katonks and Japanese Americans from Hawaii–such as me. It’s not a completely negative term, but it’s certainly not positive.

I hope you enjoy Jeanne’s wisdom. The goal of this episode is to help prevent anything like this from happening again.

Question of the week!

This week’s question is:


Can you imagine having all your rights stripped away in America? It's happened before. #remarkablepeople
Click To Tweet


Use the #remarkablepeople hashtag to join the conversation!

Where to subscribe: Apple Podcast | Google Podcasts

Learn from Remarkable People Guest, Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston

Follow Remarkable People Host, Guy Kawasaki

I’m Guy Kawasaki, and this Remarkable People. My thanks to Jeff Sieh and Peg Fitzpatrick for their awesome work in helping me deliver this podcast every week.

Photos courtesy of Wikimedia: Cover photo – Manzanar War Relocation Center – photo Ansel Adams, from the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppprs.00276
Manzanar War Relocation Center, mid-1940s, Picture taken from guard tower, summer heat, view SW

The post Jeanne Wakatsuki Houston: Japanese American Internment Camp Survivor and Memoirist appeared first on Guy Kawasaki.

Share